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The Quick 10: Little-Known Second Verses of Children’s Songs

The Quick 10: Little-Known Second Verses of Children’s Songs
Either I had a really short attention span as a kid and never made it past the first verse of a song (which is entirely possible), or there are some obscure lyrics to the songs we all know and love. Here are a few examples. 1. I’m a Little Teapot. “I’m a clever teapot, Yes it’s true Here let me show you What I can do I can change my handle And my spout Just tip me over and pour me out!” 2. Do your ears hang high? 3. Last night as I lay on my pillow Last night as I lay on my bed Last night as I lay on my pillow I dreamed that my Bonnie was dead 4. In a cavern, in a canyon, Excavating for a mine Dwelt a miner forty niner, And his daughter Clementine Light she was and like a fairy, And her shoes were number nine, Wearing boxes, without topses, Sandals were for Clementine. 5. The next verses include telling the captive bird that after his head, his beak, neck, back, wings, feet and tail will follow. 6. Thys Franklyn, syrs, he brewed goode ayle, And he called it Rare good Styngo! 7. 8. 9. 10.

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Cryptographers chosen to duke it out in final fight - physics-math - 13 December 2010 A competition to find a replacement for one of the gold-standard computer security algorithms used in almost all secure, online transactions just heated up. The list of possibilities for Secure Hash Algorithm-3, or SHA-3, has been narrowed down to five finalists. They now face the onslaught of an international community of "cryptanalysts" – who will analyse the algorithms for weaknesses – before just one is due to be selected as the winner in 2012. The competition, which is being run by the US National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, Maryland, is a huge deal for cryptographers and cryptanalysts alike.

Common Faults in Human Thought Humans This list is a follow up to Top 10 Common Faults in Human Thought. Thanks for everyone’s comments and feedback; you have inspired this second list! It is amazing that with all these biases, people are able to actually have a rational thought every now and then. There is no end to the mistakes we make when we process information, so here are 10 more common errors to be aware of. The confirmation bias is the tendency to look for or interpret information in a way that confirms beliefs. Do not stand at my grave and weep Do Not Stand at My Grave and Weep is a poem written in 1932 by Mary Elizabeth Frye. Although the origin of the poem was disputed until later in her life, Mary Frye's authorship was confirmed in 1998 after research by Abigail Van Buren, a newspaper columnist.[1] Full text[edit]

Religion no excuse for promoting scientific ignorance - science-in-society - 08 February 2011 The US constitution allows people to believe what they want. However, it does not require universities to promote ignorance LAST month, the University of Kentucky in Lexington paid $125,000 to settle a religious discrimination lawsuit brought by astrophysicist Martin Gaskell. Gaskell claimed the university did not appoint him director of their student observatory because of his Christian faith, despite him being the best candidate. The settlement - which is not an admission of wrongdoing - means the suit will not come to court. Married Couple In The Same Photo As Children Here's a photo coincidence on the lines of the post I published called Photo Taken Of Father Showed His Missing Daughter. I came across this new one by chance on a video from WXII 12 TV . The odds against this coincidence happening must be millions to 1. Young newly weds Alex and Donna Voutsinas were looking through some of Donna's old photos from when she was a child and came across one of her at Disney World. Nothing too unusual about this, you may say.

Outta Ray's Head Poetry Lessons I started out to do a lesson on poetry and before I knew it the whole thing was getting out of hand and I ended up with a page with links. I just like poetry too much and over the years I have developed more than a dozen integrated units that revolve around themes and/or styles. I have a firm belief that poetry has got to be taught within an easily understood frame such as "imagist' poetry or "love" poetry or "humanist" poetry or "modern problems"; you just can't throw a bunch of poems together and hope to get to the test with as little hassle as possible.There is one overwhelming argument in favour of teaching poetry and that is that it is a form of communication and part of an English teacher's job is to teach communication skills.

America as it could have been: 8 North American nations that didn’t make it to the 21st Century North America. We all recognise it on a map: it’s the continent above South America. Most of us can even name the countries, Canada, the United States, Mexico... other Spanish speaking ones... But, the point is, it might not have turned out that way. North America could have been as difficult a continent to learn as Europe if history had been different. Here are eight nations that all existed in North America mat one point in time, but didn't last to the twenty-first century.

Mental Math Tricks One thing that fascinates me is performing mental math. Being able to quickly perform additions, subtraction, multiplications etc is a good way to impress your friends. The problem is, I’m not a math genius, and I don’t know much behind simple arithmetic. If you’re anything like me, but you’d still like to learn some basic math tricks, I hope you’ll find this list useful. Simple tricks Poetry and Literature Poet Laureate, Juan Felipe Herrera Herrera took up his duties as the 21st Poet Laureate on Tuesday, September 15th—the first day of Hispanic Heritage Month—with a reading of his work at the Library’s Coolidge Auditorium. Herrera launched his Poet Laureate Project—La Casa de Colores—on September 15 (see details below). More About Juan Felipe Herrera Past Poets Laureate La Casa de Colores

Jevons' Paradox and the Perils of Efficient Energy Use It's a given among Peak Oilers and New Urbanists alike that the imminent and permanent return of high oil prices will send convulsions through the suburban American landscape. But it's one thing when professional Jeremiahs like James Howard Kunstler preach this to the converted week after week, and something else when the Urban Land Institute and PricewaterhouseCoopers advise commercial real estate investors to "shy away from fringe places in the exurbs and places with long car commutes or where getting a quart of milk takes a 15-minute drive." Oil shocks will do what urban planners can't seem to and the government won't (through sharply higher gas taxes or putting a price on carbon): force people to live at greater densities.

Bizarre Mental Delusions Here are 15 of the most bizarre syndromes to be documented since that time. . . 1. Capgras Delusion In the heat of an argument it’s normal to want to disown your parents or kids, but for the sufferer of Capgras delusions that feeling never goes away.

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