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How to Map the New Economy in Your City

How to Map the New Economy in Your City
Mapping your community helps demonstrate that “Another World” is not only possible, it already exists. New economy projects are mostly unconnected, so each one struggles alone rather than supporting each other and even in small towns, people often don't know what's happening in their own backyards. Mapping also can become a community organizing tool - uncovering a reservoir of social assets even in the poorest neighborhoods, which can seed mutual aid and cooperative business ideas to fill in the gaps. USSEN has a list of communities that have done independent mapping projects, each using its own methodology, criteria, platform and map name. When thinking of entities to fill your map, consider if they incorporate any solidarity economy principles: solidarity, mutualism, cooperation, equity, social and environmental prioritization, democracy, pluralism, and grassroots driven. Most groups will not meet all these criteria, but these principles leave something to aspire and work towards.

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Related:  Social Resource MappingThe New EconomyLocal Economies

Publications & Toolkits @ Mapping for Change Ellul, C., Haklay, M., Francis, L. & Rhametulla, H. (2009) A Mechanism to Create Community Maps for Non-Technical Users. Paper prepared for the International Conference on Advanced Geographic Information Systems and Web Services. PDF Ellul, C., Rhametulla, H. & Haklay, M. (2009) Beyond the Internet – Increasing Participation in Community Events by Text Messaging. 2012 Map of the Decade A Century of Transformation, A Decade of Turbulence Today, even as the incumbent patterns are fading, a new world is taking shape. It's a world that will flourish by the end of the century. But the transition from old to new will bring turbulence.

Emotional Economics: Measuring What Matters Since the economy came crashing down on us in 2008, there’s been a growing consensus that our economic system as we know it is not sustainable. What we’ve since learned is that money is fiction and the security we think we’ve been building all these years is a myth. Other than its dysfunction, nothing in the conventional economy seems real. Why Use it? Community mapping provides equitable development practitioners with accurate and unique information, effective visual tools, and the ability to understand and share their own experience in the context of their changing environment. Community mapping is powerful because of its capacity to democratize information-both what is recorded and who has access to it. When presented well, maps have the power to convey complicated information and relationships in a straightforward, accessible manner, enabling non-experts to participate meaningfully in community planning and advocacy. Seeing the Connections By looking at the map we created, people hot a sense why certain areas weer targeted to build housing, playgrounds, community gardens. They could see both the big picture and after school programs for their kids

New App Lets You Boycott Koch Brothers, Monsanto And More By Scanning Your Shopping Cart In her keynote speech at last year’s annual Netroots Nation gathering, Darcy Burner pitched a seemingly simple idea to the thousands of bloggers and web developers in the audience. The former Microsoft MSFT +0.13% programmer and congressional candidate proposed a smartphone app allowing shoppers to swipe barcodes to check whether conservative billionaire industrialists Charles and David Koch were behind a product on the shelves. Burner figured the average supermarket shopper had no idea that buying Brawny paper towels, Angel Soft toilet paper or Dixie cups meant contributing cash to Koch Industries Koch Industries through its subsidiary Georgia-Pacific. Similarly, purchasing a pair of yoga pants containing Lycra or a Stainmaster carpet meant indirectly handing the Kochs your money (Koch Industries bought Invista, one of the world’s largest fiber and textiles companies, in 2004 from DuPont).

How do we organise to create a new local economy? You are here: Home » News & Blogs » How do we organise to create a new local economy? One of the biggest challenges to human beings living sustainably on the planet is not so much about the technology or lack of resources- its more about how we can work together and organise ourselves to respond to the collective challenges we face. So many of the challenges of today require us to work things out together to find a shared response- in groups, teams, organisations, communities, nations…. And that’s fine working in groups, teams or organisations- except that they are full of people! So many social change groups and organisations who try and do things like create a more sustainable, resilient and equitable local economic system come up against the challenges of working together.

Social Compact CityDNA Data Mapping Tool Advances in web technologies and user interface design have provided Social Compact with the opportunity to dramatically increase the value and reach of their research by placing it more directly in front of a contingency of stakeholders with diverse needs. Social Compact is developing one of the most innovative web-based GIS and information platforms in the country, CityDNA. What's Wrong with Technological Fixes? If you are looking for some smart, informed skepticism about the promise of digital technology to cure important problems, Evgeny Morozov is the critic for you. In his second book, To Save Everything, Click Here: The Folly of Technological Solutionism, the BR contributing editor takes aim at what he describes as Silicon Valley’s “amelioration orgy.” According to the ameliorationists, “all that matters” is “to get humans to behave in more responsible and sustainable ways, to maximize efficiency.” Morozov characterizes this impulse to fix everything as “solutionism,” and offers two broad challenges to the solutionist sensibility. First, solutionists often turn public problems into more bite-sized private ones. Instead of addressing obesity by regulating the content of food, for example, they offer apps that will ‘nudge’ people into better personal choices.

The sharing economy is bullsh!t. Here’s how we can take it back The sharing economy is bullshit. Airbnb is a rental broker. Uber and Lyft are unregulated cab services. Taskrabbit and similar “servant economy” enterprises let well-off people pay less well-off people to do their chores — without providing anyone the benefits and security of traditional employment. “Sharing” has been appropriated and stripped of all meaning by people trying to sell you things, much like sustainability was. Once “green” became hip and important about a decade ago, corporate bigwigs started preaching about sustainable profits and misleading eco-labels got slapped on single-use disposable plastic water bottles.

Social network analysis software Social network analysis software (SNA software) is software which facilitates quantitative or qualitative analysis of social networks, by describing features of a network either through numerical or visual representation. Overview[edit] Some SNA software can perform predictive analysis.[5] This includes using network phenomena such as a tie to predict individual level outcomes (often called peer influence or contagion modeling), using individual-level phenomena to predict network outcomes such as the formation of a tie/edge (often called homophily models[6]) or particular type of triad, or using network phenomena to predict other network phenomena, such as using a triad formation at time 0 to predict tie formation at time 1. Network analysis software generally consists of either packages based on graphical user interfaces (GUIs), or packages built for scripting/programming languages. GUI packages are easier to learn, while scripting tools are more powerful and extensible.

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