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The future of jobs: The onrushing wave

The future of jobs: The onrushing wave
IN 1930, when the world was “suffering…from a bad attack of economic pessimism”, John Maynard Keynes wrote a broadly optimistic essay, “Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren”. It imagined a middle way between revolution and stagnation that would leave the said grandchildren a great deal richer than their grandparents. But the path was not without dangers. One of the worries Keynes admitted was a “new disease”: “technological unemployment…due to our discovery of means of economising the use of labour outrunning the pace at which we can find new uses for labour.” His readers might not have heard of the problem, he suggested—but they were certain to hear a lot more about it in the years to come. For the most part, they did not. For much of the 20th century, those arguing that technology brought ever more jobs and prosperity looked to have the better of the debate. When the sleeper wakes Be that as it may, drudgery may soon enough give way to frank unemployment. The lathe of heaven

http://www.economist.com/news/briefing/21594264-previous-technological-innovation-has-always-delivered-more-long-run-employment-not-less

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The Rich and Their Robots Are About to Make Half the World's Jobs Disappear Two hugely important statistics concerning the future of employment as we know it made waves recently: 1. 85 people alone command as much wealth as the poorest half of the world. 2. 47 percent of the world's currently existing jobs are likely to be automated over the next two decades. Meet the Team – Greg Miley 1. Tell us a little bit about yourself I joined The Instant Group in 2015 as the Senior Operator Account Manager. I have worked previously in the property industry for over two years. The Robots, AI, and Unemployment Anti-FAQ Q. Are the current high levels of unemployment being caused by advances in Artificial Intelligence automating away human jobs? A. Conventional economic theory says this shouldn't happen. Suppose it costs 2 units of labor to produce a hot dog and 1 unit of labor to produce a bun, and that 30 units of labor are producing 10 hot dogs in 10 buns. If automation makes it possible to produce a hot dog using 1 unit of labor instead, conventional economics says that some people should shift from making hot dogs to buns, and the new equilibrium should be 15 hot dogs in 15 buns.

Garbage designer, robot counsellor among the predicted jobs of 2030 About 15 years from now, farmers will have made their way from the countryside to the city, counsellors will help ensure the right robot goes to the right family and garbage designers will lead the upcycling movement. Those are some predictions made by the Canadian Scholarship Trust Plan’s Inspired Minds initiative, which aims to give Canadians a sneak peek of the job market in 2030. Some of the more curious careers include: Nostalgist: A mix between a therapist, an interior designer and a historical researcher, a nostalgist will help the wealthy elderly of 2030 create a living space inspired by their favourite decade. Rewilder: The old name for this job was "farmer."

AI, Robotics, and the Future of Jobs Key Findings The vast majority of respondents to the 2014 Future of the Internet canvassing anticipate that robotics and artificial intelligence will permeate wide segments of daily life by 2025, with huge implications for a range of industries such as health care, transport and logistics, customer service, and home maintenance. But even as they are largely consistent in their predictions for the evolution of technology itself, they are deeply divided on how advances in AI and robotics will impact the economic and employment picture over the next decade. We call this a canvassing because it is not a representative, randomized survey.

The Myth of the Myth of Technological Unemployment Over at Slate, Matt Yglesias has a post titled ‘The Myth of Technological Unemployment‘ accompanied by a graph showing that hours worked in the US have been rising and falling in lockstep with output. He writes Machines are replacing workers, in other words, but they’ve been doing so since the cotton gin and the spinning jenny. Which is absolutely true and completely uncontroversial. It’s also true that previous waves of automation have not, in the long run, led to mass unemployment. But is that still true?

10 well paid jobs of the future Mr Bellini posited the idea of an elderly well-being consultant, who specialises in personalised care for older patients, or a memory augmentation surgeon who helps counter memory loss. He also saw big changes in farming as food resources became scarce, with genetically modified crops becoming common and crops grown vertically in areas resembling multi-storey car parks to save space. Ian Pearson, a futurologist who wrote You Tomorrow, sees job growth in the field of augmented reality, where the real world is overlaid with computer-generated images. “When you look at a building it’s constrained by planning laws, but in cyberspace you can make it look however you want,” he said. “A company with a high street presence could make their shop look like Downton Abbey, or set it in a post-nuclear apocalypse environment.” Mr Pearson also argued that the better technology gets, the more people will have to focus on their “human skills” to survive in the workforce.

Technology Isn't Destroying Jobs; It's Creating Them A study backed by over 140 years of data refutes the claim that technology is destroying the job market. Where one avenue closes in the jobs market, others open, states a report that studied job census data from England and Wales since 1871. That’s not to say that the fear that robots are taking over laborious processes is unjustified. From the 1800s, Luddites smashed weaving machines, and nowadays retail staff worry about being replaced by automatic checkouts. The battle between man and machine does indeed exist in the physical labor industry, with jobs such as agricultural labor and launderers plummeting over the decades. The decrease of agricultural laborers over time; Image by England and Wales Census records

Are you ready? Here are the top 50 jobs of the future Sarah Stack Published 24/06/2014|02:30 Share A JOB for life is now an unimaginable thing for most teenagers. See list at end of article Many of our schoolchildren will live to see and even work in the 22nd Century. Experts pledge to rein in AI research 12 January 2015Last updated at 07:07 ET <div class="warning"><img class="holding" src=" alt="Stephen Hawking" /><p><strong>Please turn on JavaScript.</strong> Media requires JavaScript to play.

Robots will steal your job, but that's OK: how to survive the economic collapse and be happy You are about to become obsolete. You think you are special, unique, and that whatever it is that you are doing is impossible to replace. You are wrong.

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