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Eric Weisstein's World of Astronomy

Eric Weisstein's World of Astronomy
Related:  30 years of Space Shuttle historyKnowledge

Space diamond, larger than Earth, spotted by astronomers - Technology & science - Space - Space.com Move over, Hope Diamond. The most famous gems on Earth have new competition in the form of a planet made largely of diamond, astronomers say. The alien planet, a so-called "super-Earth," is called 55 Cancri e and was discovered in 2004 around a nearby star in our Milky Way galaxy. After estimating the planet's mass and radius, and studying its host star's composition, scientists now say the rocky world is composed mainly of carbon (in the form of diamond and graphite), as well as iron, silicon carbide, and potentially silicates. At least a third of the planet's mass is likely pure diamond. "This is our first glimpse of a rocky world with a fundamentally different chemistry from Earth," lead researcher Nikku Madhusudhan of Yale University said in a statement. 55 Cancri e is the first likely "diamond planet" to be identified around a sun-like star, though such worlds have been theorized before.

Neutron stars M. Coleman Miller Professor of Astronomy, University of Maryland Welcome to my neutron star page! For those who want a quick intro to selected cool things about neutron stars and black holes, check out a poster I made for a science fair at the University of Chicago. I also have a link to some questions I have received about neutron stars, and my answers. Getting started on neutron stars Neutron stars are the collapsed cores of some massive stars. At these incredibly high densities, you could cram all of humanity into a volume the size of a sugar cube. All in all, these extremes mean that the study of neutron stars affords us some unique glimpses into areas of physics that we couldn't study otherwise. So, like, how do we get neutron stars? Neutron stars are believed to form in supernovae such as the one that formed the Crab Nebula (or check out this cool X-ray image of the nebula, from the Chandra X-ray Observatory). The guts of a neutron star The decline and fall of a neutron star

500 Free Online Courses from Top Universities Get 1,300 free online courses from the world's leading universities -- Stanford, Yale, MIT, Harvard, Berkeley, Oxford and more. You can download these audio & video courses (often from iTunes, YouTube, or university web sites) straight to your computer or mp3 player. Over 45,000 hours of free audio & video lectures, await you now. Humanities & Social Sciences Art & Art History Courses Classics Courses Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (Syllabus) - Free iTunes Video - Free Online Video - David O'Connor, Notre DameAncient Greece: City and Society - Free iTunes Audio - La Trobe University, AustraliaAncient Greece: Myth, Art & War - Free iTunes Audio - Dr Gillian Shepherd, La Trobe University - AustraliaAncient Greek History - Free Online Course - Donald Kagan, YaleAncient Israel - Free Online Course - Daniel Fleming, NYUAncient Philosophy - Free Online Audio - David Ebrey, UC BerkeleyAncient Wisdom and Modern Love (Syllabus) - Free iTunes Video - Free Online Video - David O'Connor, Notre Dame

Atomic Rockets Your imagination has been captured by the roaring rockets from Heinlein's SPACE CADET or the Polaris from TOM CORBETT, SPACE CADET. But are such rockets possible? How does one go about defining the performance of these atomic-powered cruisers? This document gives some hints and equations that will allow back-of-the-envelope calculations on such matters. Though horribly simplistic, they are far better than just making up your figures. This site was mainly intended for science fiction authors who wanted a little scientific accuracy so they can write SF "the way God and Heinlein intended" (Arlan Andrews's Law). The engine and the torchship pages explain how easily do some of the calculations using Nomograms. . While this site originally focused on rocketry equations, as you can see it has grown to encompass other topics of interest to SF authors and game designers.

Kids' Club Skip to main content NASA Kids Club › Text Only Site Let's Go to Mars! Plan. Pack. Make a Galactic Mobile Decorate Your Space! Watch 'Ready Jet Go!' Ready Jet Go! Orion Puzzles and Coloring Sheets Print and Play. For Parents and Teachers Teach your kids and students safe surfing habits.› Children's Protection Act Learn about what you can do to protect your privacy online.›

A Rocket To Nowhere A Rocket To Nowhere The Space Shuttle Discovery is up in orbit, safely docked to the International Space Station, and for the next five days, astronauts will be busy figuring out whether it's safe for them to come home. In the meantime, the rest of the Shuttle fleet is grounded (confined to base, not allowed to play with its spacecraft friends) because that pesky foam on the fuel tank keeps falling off. There are 28 Space Shuttle flights still scheduled, firmly or tentatively, through 2010, when the current orbiter is supposed to retire in favor of a yet-to-be-designed replacement (which will not fly until 2014). For all the talk of safety improvements, there really isn't a way to make the Shuttle much safer. With 28 launches to go, probability tells us that the chance of losing another orbiter before the program's scheduled retirement is about 50-50. Future archaeologists trying to understand what the Shuttle was for are going to have a mess on their hands.

Personal and Historical Perspectives of Hans Bethe Khan Academy SpaceWeather.com -- News and information about meteor showers, solar flares, auroras, and near-Earth asteroids The Space Shuttle Since 1981, NASA space shuttles have been rocketing from the Florida coast into Earth orbit. The five orbiters — Columbia, Challenger, Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour — have flown more than 130 times, carrying over 350 people into space and travelling more than half a billion miles, more than enough to reach Jupiter. Designed to return to Earth and land like a giant glider, the shuttle was the world's first reusable space vehicle. More than all of that, though, the shuttle program expanded the limits of human achievement and broadened our understanding of our world. It all started with STS-1, launched on April 12, 1981, just twenty years to the day after Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first human in space. For an entire generation, the space shuttle was NASA. In this feature, we look back at the Shuttle's historic missions, the people it flew into space, and its achievements.

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