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Interactive Circle of Fifths User's Guide

Interactive Circle of Fifths User's Guide
The Interactive Circle of Fifths ("the Circle" for short) is a tool designed to help musicians to: figure out the key of a piece of music easily transpose music to a different key compose new music understand key signatures, scales, and modes The concept of the circle of fifths is not a new one (see this Wikipedia article for more information), but there is more to this simple, yet profound structure than the traditional diagram can easily convey. The Interactive Circle of Fifths goes beyond the limitations of a static diagram without sacrificing clarity and simplicity. Using the Circle Offline: You can easily download a copy of the Circle to use when you don't have an Internet connection: If you use Internet Explorer or Opera: Use the Save As... command in the browser's File menu, and save as type "Web Archive, single file (*.mht)". If you use Safari: Use the Save As... command in the browser's File menu, and save as format "Web Archive". (seven sharps) through C (seven flats). Phrygian?) Related:  General Theory

Interval (music) Melodic and harmonic intervals. Play Example: Perfect octave on C in equal temperament and just intonation: 2/1 = 1200 cents. Play The size of an interval (also known as its width or height) can be represented using two alternative and equivalently valid methods, each appropriate to a different context: frequency ratios or cents. The size of an interval between two notes may be measured by the ratio of their frequencies. Mathematically, the size in cents of the interval from frequency f1 to frequency f2 is Main intervals from C. Play In Western music theory, an interval is named according to its number (also called diatonic number) and quality. Perfect Perfect intervals on C. Perfect intervals are so-called because they were traditionally considered perfectly consonant,[10] although in Western classical music the perfect fourth was sometimes regarded as a less than perfect consonance, when its function was contrapuntal. Major/minor Augmented/diminished Augmented and diminished intervals on C. d2 ,

Circle of fifths Circle of fifths showing major and minor keys Nikolay Diletsky's circle of fifths in Idea grammatiki musikiyskoy (Moscow, 1679) In music theory, the circle of fifths (or circle of fourths) is a visual representation of the relationships among the 12 tones of the chromatic scale, their corresponding key signatures, and the associated major and minor keys. More specifically, it is a geometrical representation of relationships among the 12 pitch classes of the chromatic scale in pitch class space. Definition[edit] Structure and use[edit] Pitches within the chromatic scale are related not only by the number of semitones between them within the chromatic scale, but also related harmonically within the circle of fifths. Octaves (7 × 1200 = 8400) versus fifths (12 × 700 = 8400), depicted as with Cuisenaire rods (red (2) is used for 1200, black (7) is used for 700). Diatonic key signatures[edit] The circle is commonly used to represent the relationship between diatonic scales. Play . History[edit] .

Key Chords Key Chords app generates guitar chord progressions automatically. Use it free online, or get the app for Mac, Windows or iOS (iPad) - Click on a chord to preview how it sounds. - Drag and drop to arrange the chord progression - Tweak the settings to control the playback speed Or role the dice and Key Chords will automatically generate a nice sounding progression. Select a Key: Select a key and choose a the major or minor scale. The resulting chord chart will display applicable chords for the selected key. Click a chord: ... and you will hear a cheap computer generated guitar playing the chord. Drag & Drop: - Chords from the chart into the progression timeline. - Rearrange Chords in the progression. - Remove chords from the progression. Roll the Dice: ... and a random chord progression will appear in the timeline. The numbers below each chord in the progression refer to the number of "beats" the chord will linger for. The "Rake Speed" refers to the speed of a single "strum." The main chart areas.

A Jazz Improvisation Primer This is the online version of my text, A Jazz Improvisation Primer. Here you can find information on almost every topic relating to jazz improvisation, from jazz history to music theory to practical advice on playing in a group. A German translation, by Edgar Lins, is online, at There is also a Hungarian translation at provided by Makrai Balázs. A Portuguese translation by Cláudio Brandt can be found at And now there is a French version at A Jazz Improvisation Primer is brought to you by Outside Shore Music. By the way, this work has been online since 1992, so if parts of it seem a bit dated, that’s why. Contents Appendices Thanks To: Ed Price (edp@panix.com), for the conversion of this resource into hypertext!

The Diatonic Scales The diatonic scales The diatonic scale is most familiar as the major scale or the "natural" minor scale (or aeolian mode). The diatonic scale is a very important scale. Out of all the possible seven note scales it has the highest number of consonant intervals, and the greatest number of major and minor triads. The diatonic scale has six major or minor triads, while all of the remaining prime scales (the harmonic minor, the harmonic major, the melodic and the double harmonic) have just four major or minor triads. The diatonic scale is the only seven note scale that has just one tritone (augmented fourth/diminished fifth). The diatonic scale and the melodic scale are the only scales which have just two types of second - the major second and minor second (represented by a whole tone and a semitone, respectively). The diatonic scale is also a proper mode. In a tonal harmonic music system, however, only two of these modes are effective - the major scale (Ionian) and the aeolian mode.

Forums : Off-topic Discussion : Music Theory- The basics updated V7 Introduction Hello there, you may have seen me around The Escapist and most know me as The Rockerfly, I am a musician. I have been playing music for about 10 years and have been writing for 3 years. I have an A level in music, grade 7 guitar, grade 5 in tuba, play the drums part time and sing for a group as well. Now to write music it is useful to have theory however it is NOT essential to writing music however it is useful if you to progress and write things out of your comfort zoneI know it is hard to know where to start with the theory and I find writing this article very difficult so please excuse me if you feel that I have not written it to your standards, every musician has been taught differently so their theory will be different Now introductions are over here are the basics of writing the harmony of a music piece and how to write the lyrics Reading Sheet Music I believe I may have missed out some content. An example of these diatonic notes is the C note. Intervals 1. Basics Cadences

Free Audio Books: Download Great Books for Free Get FREE AUDIO BOOKS from Audible.com and also Audiobooks.com Download hundreds of free audio books, mostly classics, to your MP3 player or computer. Below, you'll find great works of fiction, poetry and non-fiction, by such authors as Twain, Tolstoy, Hemingway, Orwell, Vonnegut, Nietzsche, Austen, Shakespeare, Asimov, HG Wells & more. Also please see our related collection:800 Free eBooks for iPad, Kindle & Other Devices. Fiction & Literature Music Modes Home » Piano Theory » Music Modes , The story of the musical modes starts in ancient Greece. The Greeks were the one to name the different modes after ancient Greek subgroups; the Locrians and the Dorians. Phrygia and Lydia were places with non Greek people close by. Later in the 9th century the church modes originated. Theorists took the Greek modes and applied them to their own concept. As time went on the music modes became less popular and composers preferred to stick to the Major and Minor scales for the concept of harmony has changed from being modal to being Diatonic. So why do I bother at all explaining you about the music modes if they weren't used so often as time went by. Well, that's because the modes are a great tool to use when improvising. What are the Musical Modes? Well, until today we've been speaking about scales. C major scale for example, is built out of the white keys of the piano starting from C and stepping in the sequence of 1-1-1/2, 1-1-1-1/2. Wow!

Harmonic Progressions | Learning and Loving Music Theory - StumbleUpon Kelvin, You actually caught a mistake on the roman numerals! Thanks, I’ll have to fix that. The first and last chords of the progression are not 7th chords. Somehow I inadvertently typed “I7″ on the first chord of all the major keys. (Notice that I didn’t do that for the minor keys.) In the classical tradition, for the sake of stability, the first and last chords of a circle-of-fifths progression are usually triads, not 7th chords. Harmonic Sequences Part 2 In the jazz tradition all chords usually are 7ths, in which case the progression will start and end with 7th chords. Thanks again for your interest and input.

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Music Theory - Intervals & Scales As of July 1, 2013 ThinkQuest has been discontinued. We would like to thank everyone for being a part of the ThinkQuest global community: Students - For your limitless creativity and innovation, which inspires us all. Teachers - For your passion in guiding students on their quest. Partners - For your unwavering support and evangelism. Parents - For supporting the use of technology not only as an instrument of learning, but as a means of creating knowledge. We encourage everyone to continue to “Think, Create and Collaborate,” unleashing the power of technology to teach, share, and inspire. Best wishes, The Oracle Education Foundation

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