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Interactive Circle of Fifths User's Guide

Interactive Circle of Fifths User's Guide
The Interactive Circle of Fifths ("the Circle" for short) is a tool designed to help musicians to: figure out the key of a piece of music easily transpose music to a different key compose new music understand key signatures, scales, and modes The concept of the circle of fifths is not a new one (see this Wikipedia article for more information), but there is more to this simple, yet profound structure than the traditional diagram can easily convey. The Interactive Circle of Fifths goes beyond the limitations of a static diagram without sacrificing clarity and simplicity. Using the Circle Offline: You can easily download a copy of the Circle to use when you don't have an Internet connection: If you use Internet Explorer or Opera: Use the Save As... command in the browser's File menu, and save as type "Web Archive, single file (*.mht)". If you use Safari: Use the Save As... command in the browser's File menu, and save as format "Web Archive". (seven sharps) through C (seven flats). Phrygian?) Related:  General Theory

Circle of fifths Circle of fifths showing major and minor keys Nikolay Diletsky's circle of fifths in Idea grammatiki musikiyskoy (Moscow, 1679) In music theory, the circle of fifths (or circle of fourths) is a visual representation of the relationships among the 12 tones of the chromatic scale, their corresponding key signatures, and the associated major and minor keys. More specifically, it is a geometrical representation of relationships among the 12 pitch classes of the chromatic scale in pitch class space. Definition[edit] Structure and use[edit] Pitches within the chromatic scale are related not only by the number of semitones between them within the chromatic scale, but also related harmonically within the circle of fifths. Octaves (7 × 1200 = 8400) versus fifths (12 × 700 = 8400), depicted as with Cuisenaire rods (red (2) is used for 1200, black (7) is used for 700). Diatonic key signatures[edit] The circle is commonly used to represent the relationship between diatonic scales. Play . History[edit] .

Key Chords Key Chords app generates guitar chord progressions automatically. Use it free online, or get the app for Mac, Windows or iOS (iPad) - Click on a chord to preview how it sounds. - Drag and drop to arrange the chord progression - Tweak the settings to control the playback speed Or role the dice and Key Chords will automatically generate a nice sounding progression. Select a Key: Select a key and choose a the major or minor scale. The resulting chord chart will display applicable chords for the selected key. Click a chord: ... and you will hear a cheap computer generated guitar playing the chord. Drag & Drop: - Chords from the chart into the progression timeline. - Rearrange Chords in the progression. - Remove chords from the progression. Roll the Dice: ... and a random chord progression will appear in the timeline. The numbers below each chord in the progression refer to the number of "beats" the chord will linger for. The "Rake Speed" refers to the speed of a single "strum." The main chart areas.

A Jazz Improvisation Primer This is the online version of my text, A Jazz Improvisation Primer. Here you can find information on almost every topic relating to jazz improvisation, from jazz history to music theory to practical advice on playing in a group. A German translation, by Edgar Lins, is online, at There is also a Hungarian translation at provided by Makrai Balázs. A Portuguese translation by Cláudio Brandt can be found at And now there is a French version at A Jazz Improvisation Primer is brought to you by Outside Shore Music. By the way, this work has been online since 1992, so if parts of it seem a bit dated, that’s why. Contents Appendices Thanks To: Ed Price (edp@panix.com), for the conversion of this resource into hypertext!

Forums : Off-topic Discussion : Music Theory- The basics updated V7 Introduction Hello there, you may have seen me around The Escapist and most know me as The Rockerfly, I am a musician. I have been playing music for about 10 years and have been writing for 3 years. I have an A level in music, grade 7 guitar, grade 5 in tuba, play the drums part time and sing for a group as well. Now to write music it is useful to have theory however it is NOT essential to writing music however it is useful if you to progress and write things out of your comfort zoneI know it is hard to know where to start with the theory and I find writing this article very difficult so please excuse me if you feel that I have not written it to your standards, every musician has been taught differently so their theory will be different Now introductions are over here are the basics of writing the harmony of a music piece and how to write the lyrics Reading Sheet Music I believe I may have missed out some content. An example of these diatonic notes is the C note. Intervals 1. Basics Cadences

Harmonic Progressions | Learning and Loving Music Theory - StumbleUpon Kelvin, You actually caught a mistake on the roman numerals! Thanks, I’ll have to fix that. The first and last chords of the progression are not 7th chords. Somehow I inadvertently typed “I7″ on the first chord of all the major keys. (Notice that I didn’t do that for the minor keys.) In the classical tradition, for the sake of stability, the first and last chords of a circle-of-fifths progression are usually triads, not 7th chords. Harmonic Sequences Part 2 In the jazz tradition all chords usually are 7ths, in which case the progression will start and end with 7th chords. Thanks again for your interest and input.

Outline of basic music theory - www.oscarvandillen.com Professional music theory: an outline of basic music theory. Preface and Chapter 1 of the Outline of basic music theory – by Oscar van Dillen ©2011-2014 The beginner’s learning book can be found at Basic elements of music theory. Overview of chapters: Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 2: Sound and hearing Chapter 3: Musical notation Chapter 4: Basic building blocks of melody and harmony Chapter 5: Consonance and dissonance Chapter 6: Circle of fifths and transposition Chapter 7: Concerning rhythm, melody, harmony and form Chapter 8: Further study Preface This outline offers a concise and complete overview of basic music theory. In order to speed up consulting this online book, its chapters can as of now be found on separate pages; unfortunately the original one-page version exceeded acceptable download times, because of the length of the total materials presented. © Oscar van Dillen 2011-2014 Chapter 1: Introduction integrating hearing-reading-singing-writing

Gypsy scale The term Gypsy scale,[a] refers to one of several musical scales named after their association with Romani or stereotyped "Gypsy" music: Hungarian minor scale, minor scale with raised fourth and seventh degrees, also called double harmonic minor scale.Minor gypsy scale, minor scale with raised fourth but natural seventh. [1] Both these scales are also called Hungarian gypsy scale.Spanish Gypsy scale, another name for the Phrygian dominant scale. [1][2]Double harmonic scale, the fifth mode of the Hungarian gypsy scale. [3] Notes[edit] References[edit] Easy Way To Remember Sharps & Flats So starting off you have all probably heard of this "Circle of fifths" thing. I thought it was a piece of crap when I first learnt it and couldn't get it at all. So I discovered an easier way to remember the sharps and flats, and it also helped me to understand the Circle of fifths, too. So, for the sharps, I'll name the keys in order of how many sharps there are. Key of G = 1 sharp Key of D = 2 sharps Key of A = 3 sharps Key of E = 4 Sharps Key of B = 5 Sharps Key of F# = 6 Sharps Key of C# = 7 Sharps Now, to remember this, I used words for each Key letter and it became a story. Goes Down And Ends Battle, Father Charles Now, to remember the order of the sharps that are in each key I'm using the same words for each, like so: Father Charles Goes Down And Ends Battle. Just incase you don't get this, F# is the only sharp in the key of G. Pretty much the same thing for the Flats, too. Key order: Father's Battle Ends And Down Goes Charles Order of Flats: Battle Ends And Down Goes Charles' Father.

Universal property of music discovered Researchers at the Institute for Logic, Language and Computation (ILLC) of the University of Amsterdam have discovered a universal property of musical scales. Until now it was assumed that the only thing scales throughout the world have in common is the octave. The many hundreds of scales, however, seem to possess a deeper commonality: if their tones are compared in a two- or three-dimensional way by means of a coordinate system, they form convex or star-convex structures. Convex structures are patterns without indentations or holes, such as a circle, square or oval. Almost all music in the world is based on an underlying scale from which compositions are built. In Western music, the major scale (do-re-mi-fa-sol-la-ti-do) is the best known scale. 1000 scales By placing scales in a coordinate system (an 'Euler lattice') they can be studied as multidimensional objects. The research results were recently published in the scientific Journal of New Music Research.

6 Essentials to Master the Blues photo from Flickr Blues is one of the most important things to learn when you want to become a rock – jazz – metal – country – all round guitar player All these genres are related to or arisen from the blues. There is also a lot of blues in the songs you hear on the radio without even realizing it. It’s hard to be a great rock n’ roll guitar player without learning the blues first. Here are the 6 essentials to master the blues. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. “I’ve said that playing the blues is like having to be black twice. If you like this post, please share it on Stumbleupon.

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