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Mapmaking

Mapmaking
Monday, December 16, 2013 A good map is, I’d venture to say, just as vital to you as it is to your characters; you need a map to know the size of the world they occupy, the length of their journey, its difficulty, and distance. Furthermore, a good map serves as an important tool for your readers as well. It can give them perspective in a completely foreign world, offer subtle clues to the history and culture of your creation, and create mystery and the promise of adventure. But just as a good map can bring a novel to life, a bad map can highlight an author’s shortsightedness, reinforce weak conceptual links between the stages of a plot, and direct reader attention to lazy writing and worldbuilding. Maps as Writing Tools Making a good map is not as simple as purchasing good design tools or the appropriate number of ink pens. Tools: 3 x #2 pencils Colored pencils Micron ink pen (the smaller the better) A ruler ½ inch graph paper, printed from here: Tracing paper A notebook (paper or digital)

http://fantasy-faction.com/2013/mapmaking-for-fantasy-authors

Related:  arianamcgrathStory Maps

Favourite Fictional Characters Chosen by Barbara Trapido (The Travelling Horn Player) William is a child rebel in stifling suburbia. His instincts are against social climbing, pseudo-intellectualism and the humdrum. He has a flair for befriending eccentric outcasts, while cutting a swathe through village fêtes. 60 Awesome Search Engines for Serious Writers June 20th, 2010 Finding the information you need as a writer shouldn’t be a chore. Luckily, there are plenty of search engines out there that are designed to help you at any stage of the process, from coming up with great ideas to finding a publisher to get your work into print. WRITING TOOLS Character Pyramid Tool (PDF) Visualize your character’s FLAWS & associated behaviors (for a deeper understanding of this tool, please reference The Negative Trait Thesaurus: A Writer’s Guide to Character Flaws) Character Target Tool (PDF)

Building the Setting When you're writing a novel, character and plot (or the "who" and "what" of a story) are the two most important ingredients. But setting (the "where" and "when") comes a very close third. Actually, a powerful setting is almost like a character in its own right, in that it has... Creating Meaningful Settings Sad but true, setting in novels is mostly ignored. It’s as if writers feel they must sacrifice attention to setting on the altar of getting the story moving, but nothing could be further from the truth. The settings in your novel serve a number of very powerful functions in your scenes, and that’s why setting is an essential pillar of novel construction.

Effective Character Descriptions The following is an excerpt from Word Painting Revised Edition by Rebecca McClanahan, available now! The characters in our stories, songs, poems, and essays embody our writing. They are our words made flesh. Sometimes they even speak for us, carrying much of the burden of plot, theme, mood, idea, and emotion. But they do not exist until we describe them on the page. Until we anchor them with words, they drift, bodiless and ethereal.

Character Questionnaires Receive more writing tips and advice (along with special offers and other Gotham news). One of the best ways to get to know your characters is to ask questions about them. Many writers do this as a kind of homework before they actually start writing a story.

Good Personalities for Your Characters Edit Article Sample Character DescriptionsCreating Personalities for Your Own Characters Edited by Secretive, Julia Maureen, Flickety, Ben Rubenstein and 19 others You're on a plane to a distant country to visit some weird old relatives you are somehow related to. Static or Dynamic? Some of you may remember learning about static and dynamic characters in high school (or equivalent) English class. For those who don’t remember or otherwise could use a quick refresher, let’s take a quick look at the dictionary.com definitions for static and dynamic characters: Static character: a literary or dramatic character who undergoes little or no inner change; a character who does not grow or develop. Examples: President Snow, Voldemort, James Bond and Sherlock Holmes.

Be a Better Conversationalist Being able to hold good conversation is the foundation of every social interaction. Without this ability, getting past small talk and building stronger connections is damn near impossible. We talk to people every single day yet we get nervous and struggle during the moments that matter most. I’ve always been decent at riffing with people I already knew or was introduced to in a casual setting, like school or parties. Gain the Advantage in Social Situations Social situations are among the most important in our lives. Yet, there is a huge chance that you are oblivious to the plethora of unwritten social rules that structure everybody’s behaviour. Failing to comply to these cultural imprints can cause irreversible damage. Just following them blindly will not get you ahead. Hacking them, however, will give you the best results possible.

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