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Clay Shirky

Clay Shirky
Fifteen years ago, a research group called The Fraunhofer Institute announced a new digital format for compressing movie files. This wasn’t a terribly momentous invention, but it did have one interesting side effect: Fraunhofer also had to figure out how to compress the soundtrack. The result was the Motion Picture Experts Group Format 1, Audio Layer III , a format you know and love, though only by its acronym, MP3. The recording industry concluded this new audio format would be no threat, because quality mattered most. Who would listen to an MP3 when they could buy a better-sounding CD at the record store? Then Napster launched, and quickly became the fastest-growing piece of software in history. If Napster had only been about free access, control of legal distribution of music would then have returned the record labels. How did the recording industry win the battle but lose the war? The people in the music industry weren’t stupid, of course. But who faces that choice?

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The changing face of psychology In 1959, an American researcher named Ted Sterling reported something disturbing. Of 294 articles published across four major psychology journals, 286 had reported positive results – that is, a staggering 97% of published papers were underpinned by statistically significant effects. Where, he wondered, were all the negative results – the less exciting or less conclusive findings? Cognitive Surplus by Clay Shirky Every single year for the second half of the 20th century, the amount of television watched by humanity increased. Collectively, we now watch more than one trillion hours of television every year – something not entirely unlike, as Clay Shirky sees it, tipping the free time of the world's educated citizenry (their "cognitive surplus") down an intellectual plughole. It's not that television is evil, or even bad. It's just that, as a medium, it's incredibly good at soaking up leisure and producing very few tangible results.

50 Little-Known Ways Google Docs Can Help In Education Google Docs is such an incredible tool for college students, offering collaboration, portability, ease of use, and widespread acceptance. But there are so many options, both hidden and obvious, that there’s a good chance you’re not using Google Docs to its fullest capability. We’ve discovered 50+ great tips for getting the most out of Google Docs as a student, with awesome ideas and tricks for collaboration, sharing, and staying productive. Learning Journal I was tasked this week with creating a digital profile; what type of digital profile and how much to disclose or not to disclose was our choice. However, our choices were to be explained and supported. My response: When starting this project I began with trepidation, much the same approach I use with social media in general. I am naturally a private person and despise “small talk,” while at the same time relishing a good theoretical debate. Facebook is overwhelming for me, in that my mind has difficulty filtering all of the self-disclosure of mundane daily undertakings of a ridiculous number of acquaintances.

The Best "Entry Level" Science Fiction Books to Convert Your Friends from the article that you linked to: "Characters as young as 12 years old are married and engage in the act of "stork summoning," which is playfully omitted with an ellipsis. There is also an unhealthy preoccupation with young girls' panties and what color they might be. Improving Professional Practice:Moving to Evidence-Based Professional Practice Schools have recently begun to place increased emphasis on the use of rigorous research evidence in guiding instructional decisions. These efforts have been partly inspired by the No Child Left Behind Act's insistent call for the use of “scientifically based” research. As educators, however, we are driven by a much more powerful force than legislative mandates: We sincerely want to know that our actions will help students succeed. How can we harness the power of scientific research on behalf of the students we serve? What We Know

Gregory Stock - Redesigning Humans Critical Acclaim The Book of Questions Metaman Engineering theHuman Germline RedesigningHumans Redesigning Humans: Our Inevitable Genetic Future, 2002. An examination of the emerging reproductive technologies for selecting and altering human embryos. Research for Practitioners: Can Text Messages (SMS) Support Learning? by Clark N. Quinn “We too often neglect meta-learning (learning to learn) strategies in our approaches. Having support for these strategies, in addition to all else we do for our learners, is likely to increase the learning outcomes.” Do you take the time to read through examples provided in learning experiences and explain to yourself why the author took each step? Marcus, G.E.: Ethnography through Thick and Thin (Paper). In the 1980s, George Marcus spearheaded a major critique of cultural anthropology, expressed most clearly in the landmark book Writing Culture, which he coedited with James Clifford. Ethnography through Thick and Thin updates and advances that critique for the late 1990s. Marcus presents a series of penetrating and provocative essays on the changes that continue to sweep across anthropology.

Starting Over With Education, Joseph Chilton Pearce 1998 Interview The following conversation took place between Joseph Chilton Pearce and Casey Walker on May 20, 1998 with the production assitance of KVMR, a community-supported radio station in Nevada City. Casey Walker: Will you begin by assessing education as we know it today? Joseph Chilton Pearce: Over the past thirty years I've given some 2,500 talks to thousands of people on these issues, and it seems our whole nation's mental set is too locked into a radical denial over education. I'm pessimistic because of our capacity for denial -- what 14th century Spanish Sufi, Iban Arabi, called "our enormous capacity for self-deception" -- and our simple desire to maintain things as they are.

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