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Bill Nye the Science Guy

Bill Nye the Science Guy
By Bill Nye | Published: February 15, 2013 – 4:00 pm My O my, wow… the 7,000-ton meteor over the Chelyabinsk region slammed into our atmosphere at 15,000 km per hour (33,000 miles an hour). Witnesses could see the flash of light 500 kilometers away. It was probably 15-meters (50 feet) across. When these things hit the atmosphere they just blow up. It’s not combustion, at least at first; it’s a rock slamming into something air so hard, that it disintegrates.

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ACS Science for Kids Water is an amazing substance! It can form into a beautiful snowflake in its solid state or evaporate into the air as a gas. Experiment with solids, liquids and gases to learn more about these states of matter. How do objects move? How far can a rubber band stretch? How does energy affect what we can see, hear or feel? Science Fair Projects This is selection of ideas for 1st grade science fair projects with short project descriptions or examples as well as links to the actual science fair projects. Some of this ideas could also be used for 2nd and 3rd grades (and vice versa). Also some second grade science project ideas and third grade project ideas could be used in the first grade so check them out. At this age science projects resemble either simple games or magic tricks. Then unlike the magician you should try to explain what's going on. The goal of parents/teacher here is to help with organization of the project and experiment setup, provide simple explanation of the sciencenproject subject, and - entertain kids!

Spider Silk Is Strong Because It's Smart Spider silk is well known for some spectacular properties. It is stronger than steel and tougher than Kevlar yet flexible enough to be spun into a wide variety of shapes. New research shows that the material is not only strong but also smart. “Spider silk has a particular way of softening and then being stiff that is really essential for it to function properly,” said engineer Markus J. 40 Cool Science Experiments on the Web Perhaps you don't have enough class periods to do every science experiment you wish you could, or maybe your budget for beakers and baking soda is all tapped out. Maybe you just want to watch and see how it's done before you try to build a volcano with 24 fourth-graders. Whatever the reason, having students watch a science demonstration close up on the Web is the next best thing! Read on to discover 40 favorites for K-8 students chosen by the great people at the X-Ray Vision-aries blog. They may even inspire your students' next science fair projects! 1.

Science Friday Science Friday’s lesson plans and activities are produced by our education staff and with partner organizations. Apr. 18, 2014 Make a Model Eardrum to Detect Sound Waves By Ariel Zych Squirrel Proof Bird Feeder Ever since purchasing my first tube bird feeder I've found myself constantly at war with squirrels. I've tried various strategies; baffles, elaborate ways of hanging feeders from trees, separate squirrel feeders, dousing the bird seed with a hot pepper wash, etc.. all of which proved to be ineffective. I love nature, however it got to a point where 14 squirrels were ravaging the bird seed a day, and I stopped feeding the birds. I thought my bird feeding days were over, however after some much needed additional research I was able to design / build a very affordable squirrel proof bird feeder that really works! I have been so pleased with the design that I now have 3 such feeders in my yard, and built a 4th for my brother in order to put together this instructable. There are some guidelines below that need to be followed to ensure that squirrels cannot gain access, though they are fairly obvious as this feeder has a lower bottom side baffle.

Study shows brain flexibility, gives hope for natural-feeling neuroprosthetics Opening the door to the development of thought-controlled prosthetic devices to help people with spinal cord injuries, amputations and other impairments, neuroscientists at the University of California, Berkeley, and the Champalimaud Center for the Unknown in Portugal have demonstrated that the brain is more flexible and trainable than previously thought. Their new study, published March 4 in the advanced online publication of the journal Nature, shows that through a process called plasticity, parts of the brain can be trained to do something they normally do not do. The same brain circuits employed in the learning of motor skills, such as riding a bike or driving a car, can be used to master purely mental tasks, even arbitrary ones. Over the past decade, tapping into brain waves to control disembodied objects has moved out of the realm of parlor tricks and parapsychology and into the emerging field of neuroprosthetics. "This is something that is not natural for the rats," said Costa.

Science Fair Project Ideas Please ensure you have JavaScript enabled in your browser. If you leave JavaScript disabled, you will only access a portion of the content we are providing. <a href="/science-fair-projects/javascript_help.php">Here's how. 'Grassroots' neurons wire and fire together for dominance in the brain (Medical Xpress)—Inside the brain, an unpredictable race—like a political campaign—is being run. Multiple candidates, each with a network of supporters, have organized themselves into various left- and right-wing clusters—like grassroots political teams working feverishly to reinforce a vision that bands them together. While scientists know that neurons in the brain anatomically organize themselves into these network camps, or clusters, the implications of such groupings on neural dynamics have remained unclear until now.

Activities for Elementary, Middle-School and High School Students Featured Certified Science Playlists PowerMyLearning Playlists let educators select and sequence fun science activities, and then assign them to students based on individual needs. Customize your own Playlist or choose a Certified Playlist created by our team of experienced K-12 educators.

Discovery of gatekeeper nerve cells explains the effect of nicotine on learning and memory Swedish researchers at Uppsala University have, together with Brazilian collaborators, discovered a new group of nerve cells that regulate processes of learning and memory. These cells act as gatekeepers and carry a receptor for nicotine, which can explain our ability to remember and sort information. The discovery of the gatekeeper cells, which are part of a memory network together with several other nerve cells in the hippocampus, reveal new fundamental knowledge about learning and memory. The study is published today in Nature Neuroscience. The hippocampus is an area of the brain that is important for consolidation of information into memories and helps us to learn new things. The newly discovered gatekeeper nerve cells, also called OLM-alpha2 cells, provide an explanation to how the flow of information is controlled in the hippocampus.

Fun Sites for Primary Pupils - Science General Sites BBC Science Clips 36 interactive resources linked to the QCA Scheme of Work for Science - ideal for use with an interactive whiteboard. Life Processes and Living Things Web 2.0 Science Tools By Laura Turner The following web2.0 sites would be useful for science educators at the high school and middle school level. Some would also be appropriate for higher elementary grade levels. There are many new ‘tools’ or websites that take advantage of the higher speed and bandwidth of today’s Internet. Web 1.0 tools/websites were text based and web2.0 tools/websites are designed for full-motion video, 3D animations and are generally interactive in some manner.

this would help you in science. it would help you because it has all the videos of bill nye. this is also great for teachers because it has work sheets on the site. the only downside is some teachers dont want you watching videos in thier class. by jo010974 Jun 2

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