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Reading Like a Historian

Reading Like a Historian

http://teachinghistory.org/best-practices/using-primary-sources/24001

Related:  Tools of the HistorianWeb 2.0 tools for libraryHistory

Teaching with Primary Sources Program- Teaching with Primary Sources About the Program The Teaching with Primary Sources Program works with colleges and other educational organizations to deliver professional development programs that help teachers use the Library of Congress's rich reservoir of digitized primary source materials to design challenging, high-quality instruction. Read more about the TPS Program

Making the Most of Google Docs: Tips & Lesson Ideas Since attending the Google Teacher Academy in April, I have been trying to learn as much as possible about each Google application. The result? I am realizing how little I actually knew about these tools and how tragically I was underutilizing them! Take Google Docs, for example. Reading Like A Historian The Reading Like a Historian curriculum engages students in historical inquiry. Each lesson revolves around a central historical question and features sets of primary documents designed for groups of students with diverse reading skills and abilities. This curriculum teaches students how to investigate historical questions by employing reading strategies such as sourcing, contextualizing, corroborating, and close reading.

Best Sites for Primary Documents in US History Common Core offers an incentive for teachers to use historic documents to build literacy skills in a content area while empowering students to be the historian in the classroom. But document-based (DBQ) instruction in this context requires four key elements to be successful: The right documents. Knowing how to look at them. Letting students discover their own patterns, then asking students to describe, compare and defend what they found. Basing the task on enduring questions, the kind that students might actually want to answer. 46 Hidden Tips and Tricks to Use Google Search Like a Boss How often do you use Google to find something on the internet? If like a lot of people you use Google every day you’ll be astounded by the number of hidden tips and tricks their search facility offers. 46 of them are featured in this infographic from Who Is Hosting This, how many of those did you know about? Related

The Educated Teacher I have not taught this lesson yet, but I think it could be an appropriate warm-up activity for the Vietnam War, the Abolition Movement, or really any unit about a war, social movement, or several prominent individuals (the presidents, space travel, etc). I want to get students thinking about how/why we remember people and how our actions in the modern world can affect how people are remembered. Pairs of students can choose one of a small group of photographs of two or three famous memorials. (You might also give each pair one in particular, if you are not worried about anyone getting stuck or frustrated by lack of choice.) Students will then answer the following questions:

Teaching Adolescents How to Evaluate the Quality of Online Information An essential part of online research is the ability to critically evaluate information. This includes the ability to read and evaluate its level of accuracy, reliability and bias. When we recently assessed 770 seventh graders in two states to study these areas, the results definitely got our attention. Unfortunately, over 70 percent of their responses suggested that: Middle school students are more concerned with content relevance than with credibility. They rarely attend to source features such as author, venue or publication type to evaluate reliability and author perspective.

A Comprehensive List of Apps and Tools to Flip your Classroom For those of you intent on employing the flipped learning model in their instruction, we have curated a set of important web tools to help you create the appropriate flipped classroom environment for your students. Check them out below and as always let us know what you think of them. Enjoy

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