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Ishikawa diagram

Ishikawa diagram
Ishikawa diagrams (also called fishbone diagrams, herringbone diagrams, cause-and-effect diagrams, or Fishikawa) are causal diagrams created by Kaoru Ishikawa (1968) that show the causes of a specific event.[1][2] Common uses of the Ishikawa diagram are product design and quality defect prevention, to identify potential factors causing an overall effect. Each cause or reason for imperfection is a source of variation. Causes are usually grouped into major categories to identify these sources of variation. The categories typically include: Overview[edit] Ishikawa diagram, in fishbone shape, showing factors of Equipment, Process, People, Materials, Environment and Management, all affecting the overall problem. Ishikawa diagrams were popularized by Kaoru Ishikawa[3] in the 1960s, who pioneered quality management processes in the Kawasaki shipyards, and in the process became one of the founding fathers of modern management. Causes[edit] Causes can be derived from brainstorming sessions.

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Failure mode and effects analysis Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA)—also "failure modes," plural, in many publications—was one of the first systematic techniques for failure analysis. It was developed by reliability engineers in the late 1940s to study problems that might arise from malfunctions of military systems. An FMEA is often the first step of a system reliability study. It involves reviewing as many components, assemblies, and subsystems as possible to identify failure modes, and their causes and effects.

5 Whys The 5 Whys is an iterative question-asking technique used to explore the cause-and-effect relationships underlying a particular problem.[1] The primary goal of the technique is to determine the root cause of a defect or problem. (The "5" in the name derives from an empirical observation on the number of iterations typically required to resolve the problem.) Example[edit] Circuit Comparison of pictorial and schematic styles of circuit diagrams Common schematic diagram symbols (US symbols) Unlike a block diagram or layout diagram, a circuit diagram shows the actual wire connections being used. The diagram does not show the physical arrangement of components. A drawing meant to depict what the physical arrangement of the wires and the components they connect is called "artwork" or "layout" or the "physical design."

Pareto principle The Pareto principle (also known as the 80–20 rule, the law of the vital few, and the principle of factor sparsity) states that, for many events, roughly 80% of the effects come from 20% of the causes.[1] Management consultant Joseph M. Juran suggested the principle and named it after Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto, who, while at the University of Lausanne in 1896, published his first paper "Cours d'économie politique." Essentially, Pareto showed that approximately 80% of the land in Italy was owned by 20% of the population; Pareto developed the principle by observing that 20% of the pea pods in his garden contained 80% of the peas[citation needed]. It is a common rule of thumb in business; e.g., "80% of your sales come from 20% of your clients."

5-whys Analysis using an Excel Spreadsheet Table Find out how to visualize your five-whys analysis by putting it into a spreadsheet, including a downloadable five why template and tutorial. Part 2 of a four part series on 5-whys. By Karn G. Bulsuk OBASHI The OBASHI methodology provides a framework and method for capturing, illustrating and modeling the relationships, dependencies and dataflows between business and Information technology (IT) assets and resources in a business context. A Business and IT (B&IT) diagram built using the OBASHI Framework. It is a formal and structured way of communicating the logical and physical relationships and dependencies between IT assets and resources (Ownership, Business Processes, Applications, Systems, Hardware, and Infrastructure) to define the business services of a modern enterprise. The name OBASHI is a licensed trademark of OBASHI Ltd. Core Principle[edit] OBASHI is based around a core principle: that IT exists for one reason, namely, to manage the flow of data between business assets.

Pareto analysis A Pareto analysis in a diagram showing which cause should be addressed first. Pareto analysis is a formal technique useful where many possible courses of action are competing for attention. In essence, the problem-solver estimates the benefit delivered by each action, then selects a number of the most effective actions that deliver a total benefit reasonably close to the maximal possible one.[citation needed] Pareto analysis is a creative way of looking at causes of problems because it helps stimulate thinking and organize thoughts. However, it can be limited by its exclusion of possibly important problems which may be small initially, but which grow with time. An Introduction to 5-why Learn how to find root causes of a problem by using 5-why analysis, so you can fix the issues where it matters most. First in a series of four articles explaining this powerful tool. By Karn G. Bulsuk

Block Block diagram is a diagram of a system in which the principal parts or functions are represented by blocks connected by lines that show the relationships of the blocks.[1] They are heavily used in the engineering world in hardware design, electronic design, software design, and process flow diagrams. Overview[edit] The block diagram is typically used for a higher level, less detailed description aimed more at understanding the overall concepts and less at understanding the details of implementation. Contrast this with the schematic diagram and layout diagram used in the electrical engineering world, where the schematic diagram shows the details of each electrical component and the layout diagram shows the details of physical construction.

Fault tree analysis Fault tree analysis (FTA) is a top down, deductive failure analysis in which an undesired state of a system is analyzed using Boolean logic to combine a series of lower-level events. This analysis method is mainly used in the fields of safety engineering and reliability engineering to understand how systems can fail, to identify the best ways to reduce risk or to determine (or get a feeling for) event rates of a safety accident or a particular system level (functional) failure. FTA is used in the aerospace, nuclear power, chemical and process,[1][2][3] pharmaceutical, petrochemical and other high-hazard industries; but is also used in fields as diverse as risk factor identification relating to social service system failure.[4]

How To Think Critically and Problem Solve The quote on the right by Jean De La Bruyere may seem a bit radical, however, according to the premise of cognitive psychology, what you think is what you feel. While many people believe that your feelings precede, or are independent of your thoughts, the truth is that your feelings are products of your thoughts. This revelation can be both daunting and liberating. Daunting because it makes us responsible for our attitudes and liberating because we have the power to choose our perspective, mood and thoughts. Diagram A diagram is a two-dimensional geometric symbolic representation of information according to some visualization technique. Sometimes, the technique uses a three-dimensional visualization which is then projected onto the two-dimensional surface. The word graph is sometimes used as a synonym for diagram.

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