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Operation War Diary

Operation War Diary

http://www.operationwardiary.org/

Related:  World War 1914-1918WW1World War 1Stories from Britain

You are the Fleet Admiral of the Navy in WWI what do you do? The Situation You’re the Fleet Admiral of the Navy in World War I. Your ships are being sunk at an alarming rate by the devastatingly effective German U-Boat. Our Heritage The Our Heritage programme is for any type of project related to national, regional or local heritage in the UK. You can apply for a grant of more than £10,000 and up to £100,000. Under this programme, we fund applications from not-for-profit organisations, private owners of heritage (including individuals and for-profit organisations) and partnerships.

Treasured Trees, Yamanaka, Rix, Harrison Masumi Yamanaka, Christina Harrison, and Martyn Rix Distributed for Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew With a Foreword by Tony Kirkham 120 pages | 40 color plates | 9 1/2 x 11 | © 2015 Life In The Trenches There was nothing glamorous about trench life. World War 1 trenches were dirty, smelly and riddled with disease. For soldiers life in the trenches meant living in fear. In fear of diseases (like cholera and trench foot) and of course, the constant fear of enemy attack. Trench warfare WW1 style is something all participating countries vowed never to repeat and the facts make it easy to see why. Constructing WW1 Trenches

Is it 1914 all over again? We are in danger of repeating the mistakes that started WWI, says a leading historian - World Politics - World The newly mechanised armies of the early 20th century produced unprecedented slaughter on the battlefields of the "war to end all wars" after a spark lit in the Balkans with the assassination of the Austro-Hungarian Empire's Archduke Franz Ferdinand. Professor Margaret MacMillan, of the University of Cambridge, argues that the Middle East could be viewed as the modern-day equivalent of this turbulent region. A nuclear arms race that would be likely to start if Iran developed a bomb "would make for a very dangerous world indeed, which could lead to a recreation of the kind of tinderbox that exploded in the Balkans 100 years ago – only this time with mushroom clouds," she writes in an essay for the Brookings Institution, a leading US think-tank. "While history does not repeat itself precisely, the Middle East today bears a worrying resemblance to the Balkans then," she says.

Untold Stories of the First World War Photos, letters and other memorabilia It was the war that tore Europe apart – a struggle between the central powers of Germany, Austria-Hungary, Turkey and Bulgaria, against the allied powers of Britain, France, Belgium, Russia, Italy and the USA. No European nation was left untouched – even neutral states felt the impact of the war. A Potter in Japan, Leach 300 pages | 5 3/4 x 8 1/4 | © 2015 Cloth $35.00 ISBN: 9781910065174 Will Publish August 2015 For Sale in USA and Canada Only It would be a challenge to find a potter in the world more widely known and respected than Bernard Howell Leach. Though considered the father of British studio pottery, he is as famous in Japan as he is in Europe and the United States—not only as an artist and craftsman, but also as a philosopher. Though born in Hong Kong, Leach spent his early life in Japan. He moved to England at the age of ten, and he attended art school in London, before returning to live in Japan from 1909 to 1920.

Life in the Trenches Life in the trenches during the First World War took many forms, and varied widely from sector to sector and from front to front. Undoubtedly, it was entirely unexpected for those eager thousands who signed up for war in August 1914. A War of Movement? Indeed, the Great War - a phrase coined even before it had begun - was expected to be a relatively short affair and, as with most wars, one of great movement. First world war: memories of the last survivors 'God let me live so that I could tell the story'Ovsanna Kaloustian Turkey The diminutive old woman does not go out in Marseille much any more. She hunches over a cane and is spoilt, mollycoddled by her daughter and grandchildren. Ask her about her childhood, and she becomes perfectly alert. Ovsanna Kaloustian is 106 years old, and one of the last survivors of the Armenian genocide of 1915. As a memory bearer, she is perfectly aware of the role she has to play almost a century later.

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