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Lives in the Balance and Dr. Greene's approach

Lives in the Balance and Dr. Greene's approach

http://www.livesinthebalance.org/node/39

Related:  Audio Technology

Legacy products Sensorlab The STEIM SensorLab was one of the first small, general purpose, sensor to midi interfaces for the prototyping of musical instruments and interactive control systems. Whether the computer is a central element in an artists work or simply a tool bridging a technological gap, the need for real world input and output is essential. The SensorLab paved the way for later developments in what is now called Physical Computing, such as the ever-popular AVR-based Arduino boards. Unfortunately, the Sensorlab is no longer for sale.

Learn Your Character Strengths Movies are an art-form highly suited for inspiring character strengths and helping in the discovery, understanding and exploration of these positive aspects in human beings. Ryan Niemiec (VIA's education director) and Danny Wedding explore 1,500 examples in their book Positive Psychology at the Movies, 2nd edition (2014). They explain that the best positive psychology movies meet the following criteria: Strong portrayal of a character's signature strengths which are critical to the character's identity; Depicts conflict/obstacles that challenge the character; The character uses strengths to overcome the adversity; The film's overall presentation is uplifting or speaks deeply to the human condition.

DIY MIDI controllers using PIC microcontrollers and Basic Stamps Introduction By combining a PIC microcontroller or Basic Stamp II with a few passive components it is not difficult to construct your own knob box, trigger box, or other MIDI input device. A knowledge of electronics may be required for interfacing to some sensors. Both the Stamp and PIC provide an economical (under US$100) entry point into the world of alternative MIDI controllers. This page was created to provide a starting point for people interested in building their own MIDI control devices using Microchip PIC microcontrollers or Parallax Basic Stamps.

Isomorphic keyboard Fig. 1: The Wicki isomorphic keyboard note-layout, invented by Kaspar Wicki in 1896. Examples[edit] Helmholtz's 1863 book On the Sensations of Tone gave several possible layouts. Practical isomorphic keyboards were developed by Bosanquet (1875), Janko (1882), Wicki (1896), Fokker (1951), Erv Wilson (1975–present), Wesley (2001) and Antonio Fernández (2009).[1] Accordions have been built since the 19th century using various isomorphic keyboards, typically with dimensions of semitones and tones. The keyboards of Bosanquet and Erv Wilson are also known as generalized keyboards. The keyboard of Antonio Fernández is also known as Transclado.

Terpstra Keyboard Funding a production run for the Second Generation Terpstra Keyboard Prototypes was a community project, meaning the Terpstra is not a commercially available product, and can’t be purchased anywhere. With other words, YOU CAN NOT GET ONE right now. But you can join the pre-order list and as soon as there will be at least twenty orders in place, we’ll run another batch. Microtonality, Tunings and Modes There is still a lot of good music waiting to be written in C major. — Arnold Schönberg One of the most liberating aspects about using a computer to compose music is that non-traditional “frequency space” can be explored in different ways without having to address the limitations of physical instruments or human performers. This sort of experimentation may involve working with raw, untempered Hertz values, just harmonic ratios, microtonal inflections, or “alternate” tuning systems, which we define very broadly to mean any tuning system other than the standard 12-tone equal tempered scale. But working with an expanded frequency space using MIDI synthesizers will quickly expose a strong bias of MIDI towards the popular music tradition and the Western tonal system in general. MIDI and Microtonal Tuning

Church Soundguy: Effective Microphone Strategies That Produce Great Results With Church Choirs What mics work well for the choir? Where should the mics go, and how many are needed in each situation? Suggestions that point you in the right direction by Bruce Bartlett In house-of-worship sound system installations, one of the biggest challenges is miking the choir. Shure Microflex Low Profile Boundary Microphone - Black; Omnidirectional w/LED - MX395B/O-LED Shure Microflex Low Profile Boundary Microphone - Black; Omnidirectional w/LED - MX395B/O-LED The Microflex Low Profile Boundary microphone is an ideal table microphone when minimal presence is of high priority. Perfect for meeting rooms, these microphones deliver exceptional sound pickup while barely being noticed. Choose from a selection of colors and pickup patterns for customized table installations. Cartridge polar pattern indicated by model number suffix(C = Cardioid, BI = Bidirectional, O= Omnidirectional):

Sweeping the Frequencies for Precise EQing - Tuts+ Music & Audio Tutorial If I there's one plug-in that's the audio equivalent to a Swiss Army knife, it would have to be the EQ plug-in. From subtle corrections to drastic sound design changes, you can use an EQ plug-in for an almost infinite list of tasks. In this tutorial, I will show you one such technique, called Sweeping the Frequencies, that can give you surgical-like precision when EQing and notch filtering a sound source to better fit in your mix. When using an EQ—which is short for Equalizer—you are essentially given control over a sound source’s volume. But instead of having an overall global affect, like when using the master gain on a channel strip, you can turn the volume up or down on specific frequency bands independent of the other frequencies.

- Acoustical Measurements for the Rest of Us How to make acoustical measurements without a Ph.D. As Lord Kelvin said, “To measure is to know for sure…maybe. The acoustical behavior of the rooms we produce music in is often baffling. How to Control Feedback in a Sound System By Shure Notes Editors. Contributors: John Chevalier, Bill Gibson, Frank Gilbert, June Millington, Dan Murphy “John had a semi-acoustic Gibson guitar. Exploring the Boundaries – A Close Look at an Invisible Microphone By Ken Hamberg Boundary microphones as a class are often overlooked – literally. Flat-lying and inconspicuous by design, they lack the glamorous appearance and prestige of their conventional large-diaphragm counterparts, which are often photographed in the company of the world's best-known and culturally iconic singers, entertainers and public servants. Boundary microphones in fact enjoy a ubiquitous if highly discreet presence in recording studios, concert halls, installations, public address systems, conference and meeting rooms, and houses of worship. Regardless of their humble, vaguely bug-like appearance, boundary microphones represent some of the most versatile, functional, and reliable mics ever made, and we'd like to take a brief look at how they work and what they can do for you. On Reflection

Presence (amplification) In an amplifier, a presence control boosts the upper mid-range frequencies to make the sounds of voices and instruments with similar tonal ranges seem more "present".[1] On television production studio's sound desk, there can be several presence controls, for several different, switchable, frequencies.[2] There is a limit to the flexibility of such controls, and they are sometimes insufficient. If the degree of mis-match between microphones is great, simply increasing presence is not enough, and instead a sound engineer will use a graphic equalizer, sometimes several, each connected to an individual sound channel.[3] Presence controls can also be found on electric guitar amplifiers. The first presence control on a Fender amplifier, for example, appeared in 1954 on the Twin. In 1955 it appeared on the 1/15 Pro-Amp, the 3/10 Bandmaster, the 2/10 Super,[4] and the 4/10 Bassman.[5] The original Fender presence control acted upon the amplifier's negative-feedback loop.

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