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Paper-Tape Dress Form

Paper-Tape Dress Form
David Coffin Photo: David Coffin by David Coffin Barbara Deckert, a dressmaker from Elkridge, Maryland, and author of Sewing for Plus Sizes, uses a form-making method that I've seen in sewing texts from the 1930s: Brown-paper tape from an office-supply store forms a body mold as well as duct tape does, then hardens into "papier-mâché" to become a pinnable form, which you don't even have to stuff. from Threads #75, p.41 <A HREF="

Stepping Thru Crazy: Men's Button-Up Refashion... into Ladies Tank! A few years ago, when the hubby and I lived in Florida (this was pre-kids, so make that 5-ish years...) I bought him a button-up shirt for his work. The deal was that he had to wear blue or white button-ups, so I thought, "Why not both at the same time?" It was actually really easy to do... let me try once again to tell you how I used a sewing machine... eh.... First things first, I chopped the sleeves off. Then I slipped the shirt on and pinned in the sides so that it fit. I took off the shirt, flipped it inside out and sewed up the sides where my pins were, trimmed off the excess, flipped it rightside out again, and tried it on to make sure it fit. Then I pinned the armholes the way I wanted them... carefully......and sewed them. Then I cut a piece of thick white ribbon, gathered one side/sleeve/armhole-front up kind of like a fan, and wrapped the ribbon around it. To secure it in place, I attached a button (cut from the excess shirt) with a needle and white thread. That's it!

The Maxi Remember that one time I used to sew clothes? Well cross country traveling mixed with nausea every night really put a damper on my desire to sew. But I started getting the itch a few weeks ago with all of my gorgeous new fabric. It's long and stretchy. top: Cozy / necklace: J.Crew / bangles: Forever 21 / shoes: Steve Madden My Maxi skirts are available for purchase in my store, leannebarlow.com.

Urban Renewal Kool-Aid Dyed Playsilks – Tried and True A couple months ago I came upon a tutorial on The Artful Parent for Kool-Aid Dyed Playsilks. I hadn’t really heard about playsilks before that but upon further investigation found out that they’re awesome. They can be pretty much anything your child wants them to be: capes, dresses, blankets, scenery, tents and the list goes on and on. So, seven of us got together with our seven toddlers (all under 2 years) and dyed 42 playsilks in total. After we did the first batch of Kool-Aid packets, some of the mothers decided to get a bit creative with color combination and as a result we ended up with 14 different color at the end of the day. Edit: Here are a few answers to some of the more popular questions posted in the comments. Where did you get your scarves/What size were they? Will these bleed? Will this process work on other materials (cotton, wool, hair, etc)? I can’t read the color combinations!

My Kanzashi Hairpin My Kanzashi Hairpin Since I first saw Kanzashi on CraftyPod, I've admired them. They are gorgeous! But now that I've had a chance to read the instructions in Kanzashi In Bloom and even make my own, I've found that they are simple and quick to make. I made this cute hairpin in about 15 minutes. These are the five 2-inch squares of fabric I cut to make my flower. These are my folded and trimmed petals. Next you string them on some thread. The hardest part is getting the flower to look right when you tie the thread. I picked a button from the tidbits Ester included in my Specky Surprise. To finish it off, I sewed a bobby pin to the back and stuck it in my hair. Love this post? SEE MORE POSTS ABOUT: other crafts

GeorgiaPeachez: New Cutting Table Configuration I'm in love with my new cutting table :-> My old cutting table, while very functional, wasn't as fabulous looking. I was using a folding table, sitting on paint cans for height. Remember this? Instead of building a wall of cubbies, I used the cubbies to build the island cutting table. To build this I used 4 sets of cubbies and connected them for stability using L-brackets and mending brackets. Flat pattern hair band This is probably one of the simplest sewing projects ever, but I made a few miserable prototypes before arriving at it. So to spare you the same frustration: a tutorial! Most hairband patterns I've found involve sewing two pieces of fabric together. However hard I try, I always end up with something wobbly, like this: Topstitching only seems to make it worse, so I'm not even going to show you that. Another delightful thing about this hairband is that it won't mess up your bangs when you put it on, because it can be fastened at the back rather than being pushed back onto your head. First, measure the length of the band. Draw a line for the length, and mark the middle. Cut this pattern out, then trace around it onto another piece of paper. The outer edges are now longer than the middle of the pattern piece; to compensate for the wedge-shaped pieces that have been added to the widest part, take off something similar at the ends. Cut the pattern out of fabric.

The Billy Cardi Tutorial with Guest Katy from No Big Dill when i opened my inbox the other day and saw what katy from the addictive blog "no big dill" had whipped up for comfy sews VS cozy knits i swear i squealed and ran around the house doing a happy dance! wowsa! when she told me she was planning a cardigan i thought great, but this is fantastic. so simple yet so fabulous!!!!!!!!!!!!! comfy, stylish and easily personalized. i've been so excited to show you all! if you haven't been over to visit no big dill, make sure you go. katy is a busy mom of 5, yes i said 5, gorgeous kiddos. i have to admit that katy's blog is one of the blogs that i am a lurker on. i never comment, just stare in awe at all she creates and of course, how gorgeous and stylish she is. i would like to know how she stays so slim after 5 babies and how she has the time to sew & blog. i find it hard enough with 2 nevermind 5! i'm always so busy cleaning up my drool after staring at all the goodies she makes that i can't manage to type my thoughts to her posts. The Billy Cardi

Make a t-shirt headband Of all the headbands I've made, I think this is my new favorite. It's like wearing sweats on your head, without the dumpy look. It's so cushy and comfortable! And yes, I am wearing the shirt with the bottom cut off in the picture. Hey, I needed something to match okay? This could match, too. Scrounge around for an old t-shirt. Fold in half lengthwise and pin in place. Fold the headband right side out. Make a flower or two and hand stitch it over the seam. The Real Deal: It cost me pretty much nothing. Circle skirt calculator – for the drafting of full, half and 3/4 skirts. With bonus grading worksheet! | The Snug Bug Special Sunday greetings you naked molerats! Since you’re so naked, I thought you might want to make yourselves some nice little circle skirts. And perhaps, like me, you find yourself with little mole rat patterns just a touch on the small side. But the grading of a circle skirt isn’t so easy, is it you naked rodents? OK. Recently I’ve been plotting about two separate circle-skirt related issues in my head. For molerats who are unfamiliar with circle skirts, here’s the difference between the three styles. For a much more interesting comparison, here’s a full circle skirt. {image Whirling Turban} Here’s the oh, so lovely three-quarter circle skirt. And a slightly pixelated half circle skirt… {image Get Go Retro} The other circle-skirt related problem I’ve been mulling over has to do with grading up circle skirts. OK, I admit I usually grade up my circle skirts the ‘wrong’ way. My problem is (hopefully) solved! Okee dokee. Let’s move on to the grading stuff, shall we?? Whew! OK!

tutorial: how to sew a simple maxi dress The Plan. Fabric. You will be making a maxi dress so buy fabric accordingly. I stand 5′ tall (I know, I know, I am tiny) and I needed 2.5 meters of fabric with a 45-inch width. Preparation and Cutting. Sewing. Don’t forget the banana. Instructions for making the rosettes are HERE. 10 Free Tote Bag Patterns and Tutorials Totes make great handmade gifts. Here is a Tuesday Ten that shows a round-up of lovely totes. If you love to sew you might also like these free sewing tutorials right here on Skip to my Lou! Every tote needs a matching pouch. Pleated Zippered Pouch Lined Zippered Pouch 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

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