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Public Library of Science: Open Access

Public Library of Science: Open Access
The Case for Open Access Open Access (OA) stands for unrestricted access and unrestricted reuse. Here’s why that matters. Most publishers own the rights to the articles in their journals. Anyone who wants to read the articles must pay to access them. Anyone who wants to use the articles in any way must obtain permission from the publisher and is often required to pay an additional fee. Although many researchers can access the journals they need via their institution and think that their access is free, in reality it is not. Paying for access to content makes sense in the world of print publishing, where providing content to each new reader requires the production of an additional copy, but online it makes much less sense to charge for content when it is possible to provide access to all readers anywhere in the world. PLOS Takes a Different Approach PLOS applies the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license to works we publish. Benefits of Open Access Research Accelerated discovery.

http://www.plos.org/open-access/

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PLoS Biology : Publishing science, accelerating research A Peer-Reviewed, Open Access Journal Current Issue PLOS Biology is a peer-reviewed, open-access journal featuring research articles of exceptional significance in all areas of biological science, from molecules to ecosystems. Open access Open access logo, originally designed by Public Library of Science. Whilst no official open access logo exists, organisations are free to select the logo style that best supports their visual language. Other logos are also in use. 9-minute video explaining open access Open access (OA) refers to online research outputs that are free of all restrictions on access (e.g. access tolls) and free of many restrictions on use (e.g. certain copyright and license restrictions).[1] Open access can be applied to all forms of published research output, including peer-reviewed and non peer-reviewed academic journal articles, conference papers, theses,[2] book chapters,[1] and monographs.[3]

Open Data Portal 0 Have you ever wondered… which of Europe’s countries has the greenest energy supply? Or which of its economies are growing fastest? Or which organisations are lobbying the EU? Or how EU public funds are being spent? The EU gathers and generates data about these and about many other things. Sci-Nonfi: The 10 Best Science Shows to Watch Online Back-to-school season leaves us feeling bittersweet. Sure, we're psyched that we'll never have to cram for another final or tweak the margins of a term paper, but a part of us actually misses the atmosphere of academia. We don't think we're alone in saying that, after a few years out of school, we actually miss the relatively hassle-free life of learning for learning's sake. Since we aren't heading back anytime soon though, we did the next best thing, and pulled together the greatest science and technology-centric TV programs ever made.

Oxford Open Oxford Open OUP Supports Open Access Oxford University Press (OUP) is mission-driven to facilitate the widest possible dissemination of high-quality research. We embrace both green and gold open access (OA) publishing to support this mission. A Proven Track Record of Success Accelerating Future There isn’t enough in the world. Not enough wealth to go around, not enough space in cities, not enough medicine, not enough intelligence or wisdom. Not enough genuine fun or excitement. Not enough knowledge. Multimedia Educational Resource for Learning and Online Teaching Return to MERLOT II Home Page Search all MERLOT Select to go to your profile Click to expand login or register menu Select to go to your workspace

Open data An introductory overview of Linked Open Data in the context of cultural institutions. Clear labeling of the licensing terms is a key component of Open data, and icons like the one pictured here are being used for that purpose. Overview[edit] The concept of open data is not new; but a formalized definition is relatively new—the primary such formalization being that in the Open Definition which can be summarized in the statement that "A piece of data is open if anyone is free to use, reuse, and redistribute it — subject only, at most, to the requirement to attribute and/or share-alike.

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