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iPad Application Design

iPad Application Design
I held a 6-hour workshop at NSConference in both the UK and USA recently, focusing on software design and user experience. Predictably, an extremely popular topic was the iPad, and how to approach the design of iPad applications. I gave a 90-minute presentation on the subject to start each workshop, and I want to share some of my observations here. Please note: this is about the user interface conventions and considerations which apply to creating software for the iPad platform (and touch-screen tablet devices in general). It is not a technical discussion of iPad-related APIs (which remain under NDA at time of writing in early March 2010). As I watched the iPad introduction keynote, there was one thing above all which struck me: That’s iWork (Keynote, Pages and Numbers) for iPad. It’s not just a big iPhone The iPad may be a larger version of the iPhone in terms of the hardware and operating system, but treating it as the same device would be foolish. The Missing Link Master-Detail Two Hands

http://mattgemmell.com/ipad-application-design

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5 Things to Know When Designing for iOS Based on our experience creating great iOS apps, we’ve come up with a list of 5 things we believe designers should keep in mind while conceptualizing interfaces for iOS. While the focus of this article is only on iOS apps, much of the advice here translates directly to other mobile platforms. 1. Understand Your Medium This seems obvious, but designing apps instead of websites actually represents a huge shift in mindsets. iPad Apps: Physicality and Heightened Realism One of the more unique iPad User Experience Guidelines from Apple suggests that applications designed for the iPad should have a realistic, physical dimension. "The more true to life your application looks and behaves, the easier it is for people to understand how it works and the more they enjoy using it." -Human Interface Guidelines for the iPad

Deploying iPhone Apps to Real Devices In our previous article on getting started with iPhone development, you learnt how to use the iPhone SDK provided by Apple to develop your first iPhone application. For testing purposes, you used the iPhone Simulator, provided as part of the iPhone SDK. While the iPhone Simulator is a very handy tool that allows you to test your iPhone applications without needing a real device, nothing beats testing on a real device. This is especially true when you are ready to roll out your applications to the world - you must ensure that it works correctly on real devices. In addition, if your application requires accesses to hardware features on an iPhone/iPod Touch, such as the accelerometer and GPS, you need to test it on a real device - the iPhone Simulator is simply not adequate.

Cocoa (API) Cocoa is Apple's native object-oriented application programming interface (API) for the OS X operating system. For iOS, there is a similar API called Cocoa Touch which includes gesture recognition, animation, and a different user interface library, and is for applications for the iOS operating system, used on Apple devices such as the iPhone, the iPod Touch, and the iPad. Cocoa consists of the Foundation Kit, Application Kit, and Core Data frameworks, as included by Cocoa.h header file, as well as the libraries and frameworks included by those, such as the C standard library and the Objective-C runtime.[1] One feature of the Cocoa environment is its facility for managing dynamically allocated memory. Cocoa's NSObject class, from which most classes, both vendor and user, are derived, implements a reference counting scheme for memory management. Starting with Objective-C 2.0, the Objective-C runtime implements an optional garbage collector.

10 things designers need to know about iOS 7 Apple has long been criticised for the slightly haphazard approach it's taken to the user interface design of its apps, and the iOS platform in general. Some apps have featured heavily skeuomorphic design, while others have been purely functional with little or no design flourish. Yesterday, though, that all changed. At its annual developers conference, WWDC, Apple introduced an all-new design language for iOS 7, eschewing the pseudo-3D patent-leather, wood and felt in favour of a clean approach that’s typography-led and heavily (although not exclusively) influenced by flat design. This shift in approach is a game changer to designers responsible for crafting iOS app interfaces. So what changes to iOS are most relevant to designers, and how does Apple's change in thinking affect what it now looks for in iOS app interfaces?

iPad GUI PSD Design Template Now that Apple has officially released the iPad we want to start designing for it. While Apple’s interface builder is great, it doesn’t really allow us to create custom UI elements on the fly. We decided to take a page from our iPhone GUI PSD and create one for the iPad. iOS Debugging Magic Technical Note TN2239 iOS contains a number of 'secret' debugging facilities, including environment variables, preferences, routines callable from GDB, and so on. This technote describes these facilities. If you're developing for iOS, you should look through this list to see if you're missing out on something that will make your life easier. Introduction All Apple systems include debugging facilities added by Apple engineering teams to help develop and debug specific subsystems.

Apple Publishes iOS 7 Transition Guide To Help Developers Adopt Flat Design As expected, Apple is introducing a completely new design language for iOS 7. For developers, this means they will have to adapt their apps to match the rest of the operating system if they don’t want them to look antiquated. Thankfully, Apple today also published a pretty extensive guide to designing for iOS 7 and transitioning apps to the new version that helps developers understand how they should use new UI elements like borderless buttons, translucent bars and full-screen layouts for their apps.

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