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Character Strengths and Virtues

Character Strengths and Virtues
The strengths and virtues[edit] CSV defined character strengths as satisfying most of the ten following criteria. Character strengths are The introduction of CSV suggests that these six virtues are considered good by the vast majority of cultures and throughout history and that these traits lead to increased happiness when practiced. The authors draw from the writings of various thinkers. Practical applications of positive psychology include helping individuals and organizations correctly identify their strengths and use them to increase and sustain their respective levels of well-being. Finally, other researchers have advocated grouping the 24 identified character traits into just four classes of strength (Intellectual, Social, Temperance, Transcendent) or even just three classes (without Transcendence). List from the book[edit] The organization of these virtues and strengths in the book is as follows.[1] Relation to virtue ethics[edit] See also[edit] References[edit] External links[edit] Related:  (0.1) Core & Keys concept....mystique

9 Qualities Of Truly Confident People Metta Sutta Metta Sutta This is what should be done by one who is skilled in goodness And who knows the path of peace: Let them be able and upright, straightforward and gentle in speech, Humble and not conceited, contented and easily satisfied. Unburdened with duties and frugal in their ways. Let them not do the slightest thing that the wise would later reprove. In gladness and in safety May all beings be at ease. Let none deceive another, or despise any being in any state, Let none through anger or ill-will wish harm upon another. Even as a mother protects with her life her child, her only child, So with a boundless heart should one cherish all living beings, Radiating kindness over the entire world, Spreading upwards to the skies, and downwards to the depths, Outwards and unbounded, freed from hatred and ill-will. Whether standing or walking, seated or lying down, Free from drowsiness, one should sustain this recollection.

How to Get Out of Your Own Way and Unblock the “Spiritual Electricity” of Creative Flow by Maria Popova “No matter what your age or your life path … it is not too late or too egotistical or too selfish or too silly to work on your creativity.” “Art is not a thing — it is a way,” Elbert Hubbard wrote in 1908. But the question of what that way is, where exactly it leads, and how to best follow it is something artists have been grappling with since the dawn of recorded time and psychologists have spent decades trying to decode, outlining the stages of creativity, its essential conditions, and the best technique for producing ideas. In 1978, a few months after she stopped drinking, artist, poet, playwright, novelist, filmmaker, composer, and journalist Julia Cameron began teaching artists — by the broadest possible definition — how to overcome creative block and get back on their feet after a “creative injury.” Art by Sydney Pink from 'Overcoming Creative Block.' Writing in the introduction to the 10th anniversary edition, Cameron adds to the most beautiful definitions of art:

Functional Wheel PsycNET - Option to Buy The critical role of nurturing environments for promoting human well-being. By Biglan, Anthony; Flay, Brian R.; Embry, Dennis D.; Sandler, Irwin N. American Psychologist, Vol 67(4), May-Jun 2012, 257-271. Abstract The recent Institute of Medicine report on prevention (National Research Council & Institute of Medicine, 2009) noted the substantial interrelationship among mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders and pointed out that, to a great extent, these problems stem from a set of common conditions. However, despite the evidence, current research and practice continue to deal with the prevention of mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders as if they are unrelated and each stems from different conditions.

A New Map of the Human Brain Top five regrets of the dying There was no mention of more sex or bungee jumps. A palliative nurse who has counselled the dying in their last days has revealed the most common regrets we have at the end of our lives. And among the top, from men in particular, is 'I wish I hadn't worked so hard'. Bronnie Ware is an Australian nurse who spent several years working in palliative care, caring for patients in the last 12 weeks of their lives. She recorded their dying epiphanies in a blog called Inspiration and Chai, which gathered so much attention that she put her observations into a book called The Top Five Regrets of the Dying. Ware writes of the phenomenal clarity of vision that people gain at the end of their lives, and how we might learn from their wisdom. Here are the top five regrets of the dying, as witnessed by Ware: 1. "This was the most common regret of all. 2. "This came from every male patient that I nursed. 3. "Many people suppressed their feelings in order to keep peace with others. 4. 5.

6 Things {Sexy Consciously Awake} Women Want From Sex About Me I am a lover of words and all things true. I am an awake women who will not be held down. “If you want to be the kind of lover women never forget, then it’s time to seriously educate yourself on the art of sex. Contrary to popular belief, women are not less sexual than men, we’re just wired differently. While men can get an erection and go from zero to hero in less than five minutes, most women need a whole heck of a lot more than that to feel sexually satisfied. Let’s get one thing straight: women love sex. Men, do you want to see your woman’s body convulsing in orgasms? Then listen up! “Consciously awake women want more than physical sex. You are more than your physical body, which is but one level of your existence. Physical sex will only take you so far. When two people connect energetically – not just physically – MAGIC happens. “Consciously awake sex transcends basic sex on ALL LEVELS. #1 Emotional Vulnerability MEN!! #2 Passion Passionate men cannot be underrated. #3 Skills

Oddly Developed Types

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