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Your Body's Best Time for Everything

Your Body's Best Time for Everything
Updated Sept. 26, 2012 3:35 a.m. ET Could you pack more into each day if you did everything at the optimal time? A growing body of research suggests that paying attention to the body clock, and its effects on energy and alertness, can help pinpoint the different times of day when most of us perform our best at specific tasks, from resolving conflicts to thinking creatively. Most people organize their time around everything but the body's natural rhythms. Workday demands, commuting, social events and kids' schedules frequently dominate—inevitably clashing with the body's circadian rhythms of waking and sleeping. As difficult as it may be to align schedules with the body clock, it may be worth it to try, because of significant potential health benefits. When it comes to doing cognitive work, for example, most adults perform best in the late morning, says Dr. The ability to focus and concentrate typically starts to slide soon thereafter. Alertness tends to slump after eating a meal, Dr.

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On Optimal Study Time Planning Almost anyone studying for CCIE Lab has limited time resources. Practically everyone thinks about optimum study time management. For example, take IEWB-RS VOL1, which has a tremendous amount of material to work on. The workbook is structured in sections of different sizes. How to Manage Time Like You'd Manage a Budget The amount of time you have each week to accomplish tasks and get results is limited. Which means you have a finite budget of hours -- just like you have a finite budget of dollars. After reading this article, my hope is that you give your time budget the same discipline and respect (or more) that you give (or should give) to your financial budget. Staying Within Your Time Budget As an example, let's say you and your spouse have a personal budget of $400 per month for groceries. It's the last week of the month and you're at the grocery store with a cart full of items.

The Role of Identity in Making New Year's Resolutions Regardless of what type of New Year’s resolutions you are making to change particular habits (e.g., working smarter rather than harder, being more thoughtful of others, exercising more), consider the importance of also imagining yourself in the future, i.e., either being productive or lazy, kinder or inconsiderate, and fit or out of shape. Why would thinking about who we want to be, and do not want to be, help us stick to our New Year’s Resolutions, particularly if we think about ourselves as lazy, inconsiderate, or out of shape? Because when we contemplate possible selves, that is, who we hope to become in the future and who it is we fear becoming, we are more likely to engage in behaviors that help us become who we hope to be and avoid becoming who we fear. Consider the following study. Then the researchers asked the participants to report their exercise four weeks later, and eight weeks later.

Beautiful physics: Tying knots in light New research published today seeks to push the discovery that light can be tied in knots to the next level. Dr Anton Desyatnikov from the Nonlinear Physics Centre at The Australian National University is part of an international team of scientists who are designing knots in light, with potential applications in advanced modern optics, laser beams and even quantum computing. Using concepts from mathematics and physics the model Dr Desyatnikov and his colleagues have explored creates optical vortices with dark cores in a bright laser beam, that can then tangle and form links and knots.

The Straight-A Gospels: Pseudo-Work Does Not Equal Work July 26th, 2007 · 78 comments This is the first post in a three-part series focusing on the Straight-A Gospels — the core concepts behind my book, How to Become a Straight-A Student. Today we focus on Gospel #1: Pseudo-work does not equal work Here are two facts: (1) I made straight A’s in college. (2) I studied less than most people I know. My daily hourly schedule Review how you spend your time in order to help you prioritize your goals and objectives. This exercise may help: How did you do? Continue with the time management series: Time management | My daily schedule | My weekly schedule | Scheduling your school calendar | My goals | Organizing my tasks | Creating to-do lists | Avoiding procrastination | Developing self-discipline Text of the exercise: (See also the Text/Java version)

Personal Kaizen: 15 Tips for your continuous improvement Kaizen (改善) means "improvement" — "kai" (改) means change/make better, and "zen" (善) means good — but as the term is used as a business process it more closely resembles in English “continuous improvement.” Kaizen is one of the keys to the steady improvement and innovation found at successful companies in Japan such as Toyota. Says Matthew May, in his book The Elegant Solution: Toyota’s Formula for Mastering Innovation, “Kaizen is one of those magical concepts that is at once a philosophy, a principle, a practice, and a tool.” Though Kaizen is a tool used by corporations to achieve greater innovation, productivity, and general excellence, it’s also an approach, an approach that we can learn from and apply to our own lives as we strive for continuous improvement on a more personal level. We can call this “Personal Kaizen.”

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