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Top 10 Most Famous Thought Experiments

Top 10 Most Famous Thought Experiments
Thought experiments are mental concepts or hypotheses, often resembling riddles, which are used by philosophers and scientists as simple ways of illuminating what are usually very dense ideas. Most often, they’re used in more abstract fields like philosophy and theoretical physics, where physical experiments aren’t possible. They serve as some hearty food for thought, but given their complex subject matter, it’s not unusual for even the thought experiment itself to be nearly incomprehensible. 10. One of the most well known thought experiments in the field of ethics is the “Trolley Problem,” which goes something like this: a madman has tied five innocent people to a trolley track. What it Means: 9. One of the major thought experiments in epistemology (the field of philosophy that deals with knowledge) is what is known as “The Cow in the Field.” 8. 7. In truth, no one really knows for sure. 6. 5. 4. 3. 2. 1. If you’re thinking this all sounds a bit like The Matrix, you’re right. Related:  Psychology Experiments

The 5 Things I’d Tell My 21 Year Old Entrepreneurial Self | JonBischke.com 12 years ago I set out on my first foray into the world of entrepreneurship. The company was called MCSETutor.com (we later changed the name to the equally obtuse 2000Tutor.com) and while it wasn’t a huge success by dot com era standards we did sell it for a tidy profit. But looking back I’m shocked at how little I knew about entrepreneurship. As I’m sure any entrepreneur would love to do, I’d give anything to step back in time 12 years and have a chat with my 21 year old self. #1 – Take as much risk as you can as early in life as you can. I’m not talking stupid risks. #2 – Nail the fundamentals. Take some of that time and use it to build skills that will make you more effective and productive the rest of your life. #3 – Surround yourself with people who expect you to succeed in a big way. “You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.” “The quality of your life is a direct reflection of the expectations of your peer group” -Tony Robbins I’m lucky. Fantastic.

How the Brain Stops Time One of the strangest side-effects of intense fear is time dilation, the apparent slowing-down of time. It's a common trope in movies and TV shows, like the memorable scene from The Matrix in which time slows down so dramatically that bullets fired at the hero seem to move at a walking pace. In real life, our perceptions aren't keyed up quite that dramatically, but survivors of life-and-death situations often report that things seem to take longer to happen, objects fall more slowly, and they're capable of complex thoughts in what would normally be the blink of an eye. Now a research team from Israel reports that not only does time slow down, but that it slows down more for some than for others. An intriguing result, and one that raises a more fundamental question: how, exactly, does the brain carry out this remarkable feat? Researcher David Eagleman has tackled his very issue in a very clever way . Was it scary enough to generate a sense of time dilation?

400 Writing Topics - Prompts and Suggestions for Paragraphs, Essays, and Speeches - Essay Topics If getting started is the hardest part of the writing process, close behind it (and closely related to it) may be the challenge of finding a good topic to write about. Sometimes, of course, an instructor will solve that problem for you by assigning a topic. But at other times you'll have the opportunity to choose a topic on your own. And you really should think of it as an opportunity--a chance to write about something you care about and know well. So relax. To help get you thinking, we've prepared some writing suggestions--more than 400 of them, in fact. We've organized the suggested topics into 11 broad categories, loosely based on some of the common ways of developing paragraphs and essays. Now follow the links to our 400 topic suggestions and see where they take you. Describing People, Places, and Things: 40 Writing TopicsDescriptive writing calls for close attention to details--details of sight and sound, sometimes even of smell, touch, and taste.

42 Practical Ways To Improve Yourself Are you someone who likes to grow? Do you constantly seek to improve yourself and become better? If you do, then we have something in common. I’m very passionate about personal growth. SEE ALSO: How to Better Yourself One Day at a Time After 1.5 years of actively pursuing growth and helping others to grow through my personal development blog, I realize there is never an end to the journey of self improvement. As a passionate advocate of growth, I’m continuously looking for ways to self-improve. Read a book every day. I’d love to hear your thoughts on this article or anything about personal growth. Image © kevindooley Halo Effect The idea that global evaluations about a person bleed over into judgements about their specific traits. The ‘halo effect’ is a classic finding in social psychology. It is the idea that global evaluations about a person (e.g. she is likeable) bleed over into judgements about their specific traits (e.g. she is intelligent). In the same way politicians use the ‘halo effect’ to their advantage by trying to appear warm and friendly, while saying little of any substance. But you would think we could pick up these sorts of mistaken judgements by simply introspecting and, in a manner of speaking, retrace our thought processes back to the original mistake. Likeability of lecturers Nisbett and Wilson wanted to examine the way student participants made judgements about a lecturer (Nisbett & Wilson, 1977). In fact the students had been divided into two groups who were going to watch two different videos of the same lecturer, who happened to have a strong Belgian accent (this is relevant!).

Top 10 Strange Phenomena of the Mind Humans The mind is a wonderful thing – there is so much about it which remains a mystery to this day. Science is able to describe strange phenomena, but can not account for their origins. We have all some experience of a feeling, that comes over us occasionally, of what we are saying and doing having been said and done before, in a remote time – of our having been surrounded, dim ages ago, by the same faces, objects, and circumstances – of our knowing perfectly what will be said next, as if we suddenly remember it! Déjà vu is the experience of being certain that you have experienced or seen a new situation previously – you feel as though the event has already happened or is repeating itself. Déjà vécu (pronounced vay-koo) is what most people are experiencing when they think they are experiencing deja vu. Déjà visité is a less common experience and it involves an uncanny knowledge of a new place. Déjà senti is the phenomenon of having “already felt” something. Jamie Frater

Do you know your ABC’s? How to Control Negative Self-Talk Everyone has an inner dialogue that runs day and night signaling what to do, what to say, and how to feel. Most of time, people just go through the day unaware of the impact their inner thoughts have on their everyday behavior. Though, what we say to ourselves has serious ramifications, particularly if the thoughts are critical, worrisome, and victimizing. You probably don’t notice many of the thoughts you’re reacting to because they’ve become automatic. Don’t let your inner-critic control who you are and what you can become. Separate thinking, feeling, and acting Recognize when you have limiting and critical thoughts, and accept you’re going to feel anxious, inadequate, and uncertain at first. Most importantly, separate your behavior from thinking. Learning to recognize how thinking, feeling, and acting influence each other, helps you to develop emotional awareness, and to start monitoring and managing negative thoughts and behaviors.

Rosenhan experiment Rosenhan's study was done in two parts. The first part involved the use of healthy associates or "pseudopatients" (three women and five men, including Rosenhan himself) who briefly feigned auditory hallucinations in an attempt to gain admission to 12 different psychiatric hospitals in five different states in various locations in the United States. All were admitted and diagnosed with psychiatric disorders. After admission, the pseudopatients acted normally and told staff that they felt fine and had no longer experienced any additional hallucinations. All were forced to admit to having a mental illness and agree to take antipsychotic drugs as a condition of their release. The average time that the patients spent in the hospital was 19 days. The second part of his study involved an offended hospital administration challenging Rosenhan to send pseudopatients to its facility, whom its staff would then detect. The pseudopatient experiment[edit] The non-existent impostor experiment[edit]

How to tell in 15 minutes whether someone likes you - by Bridget Webber Bridget Webber's image for: "Body Language that Shows when someone of the Opposite Sex Fancies you" Caption: Location: Image by: Wouldn't it be great to be able to tell within fifteen minutes whether someone likes you or not? The Eyebrow Raise The eyebrow raise is generally reserved for members of the opposite sex who like what they see, and it happens straight away. The Smile Although smiling can be faked, a genuine smile can easily be separated from a false one. A smile that is more of a grimace, or is delivered with lips firmly shut tight and downward turning corners of the lips, is a concerted effort rather than an indication that someone likes you. The Lean. If you are sat with a person who likes you, he or she is likely to lean in toward you as you converse. If you are standing, a person will stand close to you if he or she likes you, and give you full attention. Feet. Eye Contact Touching. When you like someone, you are drawn to touch him or her, even when you try not to! Mirroring.

10 Excellent Self Improvement Podcasts Recently I discovered some excellent new self improvement podcasts, and in doing so I was reminded just how beneficial podcasts have been my development. Apart from the interesting and insightful content they can contain, podcasts are a perfect way to work in multiple positives. That is, they give me the opportunity to feed my brain with self improvement material while commuting to work, going for a walk, working out or a number of other activities. The following is a list of my 10 favorite self improvement podcasts (in alphabetical order). 1. Gary’s aim with his Awareness and Consciousness Podcast is to increase your self awareness and make it easier for you to live in the emotional state of happiness. Recommended: Not Good Enough. More: click here for the full archive. 2. Cultivate Greatness is site focused on personal development, leadership training, and life hacks. Recommended: Interview with Carmine Gallo. More: click here for the full archive. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Ten Psychology Studies from 2009 Worth Knowing About - David DiSalvo - Brainspin Image by AFP/Getty Images via Daylife Several great psychology and neuroscience studies were published in 2009. Below I’ve chosen 10 that I think are among the most noteworthy, not just because they’re interesting, but useful as well. 1. If you have to choose between buying something or spending the money on a memorable experience, go with the experience. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. How to Read Someone’s Mind | Reading someone's mind Reading someone’s mind through telepathy has a long and legendary history. But if you want to have this ability too, you may have to rethink what mind reading is. Cold Reading is actually a set of techniques developed to give the appearance of reading someone’s mind. Sounds pretty cool, huh? The next step is to profile your subject. You may know next to nothing about the person in front of you, and you don’t need to—they will give you the secrets about themselves without realizing they are, if you ask questions about them in such a way that they appear to be statements. telepathy Most of the time, your subjects will supply more information than necessary from these question-statements. Another technique is to use Barnum statements, which are named after P.T.

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