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16 Scientifically-Backed Ways To Boost Your Happiness Almost Instantly (INFOGRAPHIC)

16 Scientifically-Backed Ways To Boost Your Happiness Almost Instantly (INFOGRAPHIC)
Whether you have five minutes to relax or a year to focus on building lasting habits, here are 16 scientifically-backed ways to boost your happiness levels. Go for a run. Physical activity boosts the brain’s release of endorphins, feel-good neurotransmitters that can improve mood and well-being. Pray. Spirituality and religious involvement is linked with greater well-being and happiness, according to a review of more than 300 studies on the connection between spirituality and health, while prayer is thought to relieve stress. Laugh. Go for a stroll in the park. Perform an act of kindness. Listen to happy music. Walk tall. Meditate. Keep a gratitude journal. Go on vacation. Play with a puppy. Take a nap. Enjoy a nice cup of tea. Volunteer. Have sex. Think of happy times.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/01/07/boost-happiness_n_4532848.html

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*8Things: Standing in Your Own Power I feel powerful in this photo. What image captures you standing in your own power? I’ve been thinking a lot lately about this turn of phrase I use with the girls and with clients – “standing in your own power.” I’m not even completely sure what I mean by it, but I know it is key. I know it means not letting your internal authority be overruled by outside sources of authority (religious institutions, schools, “experts”). I know it has to do with tapping into your intuition.

15 styles of Distorted Thinking 15 styles of Distorted Thinking Filtering: You take the negative details and magnify them while filtering out all positive aspects of a situation. Polarized Thinking: Things are black or white, good or bad. You have to be perfect or you're a failure. There is no middle ground. The Happify Guide To Living A Life Without Regrets Everyone has regrets and, according to Happify, a website and app that offers psychology-based games to increase your happiness, 90% of us regret something major. Our regrets can range from the career we chose to the romantic partner we didn’t. And while it may not feel good, regret can be a positive force in our lives if we use it right, according to Happify. It can help us understand past experiences and avoid future mistakes. Some of the more interesting facts about regret, from the graphic below: 25% of us regret sharing a selfie.

30 Challenges for 30 Days Did you know that it takes 30 days to form a new habit? The first few days are similar as to how you would imagine the birth of a new river. Full of enthusiasm it gushes forth, only to be met by strong obstacles. The path is not clear yet, and your surroundings don’t agree. Old habits urge you to stay the same.

What a Shaman Sees in A Mental Hospital In the shamanic view, mental illness signals “the birth of a healer,” explains Malidoma Patrice Somé. Thus, mental disorders are spiritual emergencies, spiritual crises, and need to be regarded as such to aid the healer in being born. What those in the West view as mental illness, the Dagara people regard as “good news from the other world.” The person going through the crisis has been chosen as a medium for a message to the community that needs to be communicated from the spirit realm. How stress tears us apart 19.09.14 - Chronic stress can lead to behavioral problems. A team from the Brain Mind Institute has discovered an important synaptic mechanism: the activation of a cleaving enzyme, leading to these problems. Why is it that when people are too stressed they are often grouchy, grumpy, nasty, distracted or forgetful? Researchers from the Brain Mind Institute (BMI) at EPFL have just highlighted a fundamental synaptic mechanism that explains the relationship between chronic stress and the loss of social skills and cognitive impairment. When triggered by stress, an enzyme attacks a synaptic regulatory molecule in the brain.

This Is The #1 Way To A Happy, Healthy, Long Life Who wants to live a happy, healthy, long life? Yeah, everybody. Turns out an incredible amount of scientific evidence points to one simple answer: Relationships. Create Your Life Handbook by Celes on Mar 15, 2009 | ShareThis Email This Post One of the key tools I found critical in my pursuit of personal growth and living a purposeful life is creating my own life handbook.

Gut feelings: the future of psychiatry may be inside your stomach Her parents were running out of hope. Their teenage daughter, Mary, had been diagnosed with a severe case of obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD), as well as ADHD. They had dragged her to clinics around the country in an effort to thwart the scary, intrusive thoughts and the repetitive behaviors that Mary felt compelled to perform. Even a litany of psychotropic medications didn’t make much difference. It seemed like nothing could stop the relentless nature of Mary’s disorder.

How physical exercise protects the brain from stress-induced depression Physical exercise has many beneficial effects on human health, including the protection from stress-induced depression. However, until now the mechanisms that mediate this protective effect have been unknown. In a new study in mice, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden show that exercise training induces changes in skeletal muscle that can purge the blood of a substance that accumulates during stress, and is harmful to the brain. The study is being published in the journal Cell. "In neurobiological terms, we actually still don't know what depression is. Our study represents another piece in the puzzle, since we provide an explanation for the protective biochemical changes induced by physical exercise that prevent the brain from being damaged during stress," says Mia Lindskog, researcher at the Department of Neuroscience at Karolinska Institutet.

The Science of Happiness What makes you happy? This question is not as easy as it might seem. According to Shawn Achor in the Happiness Advantage, most Americans find free time harder to enjoy than work. Yes, you read that right. Project: Start a Commonplace Book Creating a commonplace book can help you keep track of your educational journey. It’s a place to record favorite quotes from the books you read, ideas you have, and questions that arise from your studies. Over time, your commonplace book will turn into a record of who you’ve been and how you’ve changed.

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