background preloader

Débuter avec Arduino! - Chapter Zero «tronixstuff

Débuter avec Arduino! - Chapter Zero «tronixstuff
Hello world! Updated 24/11/2012 Please join with us as we learn about electronics and the Arduino! Together through this series of tutorials I would like to share with you a journey of learning, exploration and fun with the Arduino system, and make some enjoyable, useful, interesting, useless and practical things. These posts will be published on a regular basis, on top of the other non-micro controller posts. Instead of listening to someone talking really quickly on a video, you can read and follow through at your own pace, see examples in action, learn a great deal – and be inspired to make something of your own. So let’s get started… There are over fifty chapters in this series, however you should start here (chapter zero). Getting Started with Arduino (Massimo Banzi) and also assume a basic knowledge of electronics. First of all, let’s breakdown the whole system into the basic parts. So, we have hardware and software. Now for the Arduino itself. Great! How did you go? Exercise 0.1 Notes:

http://tronixstuff.com/2010/04/04/getting-started-with-arduino-chapter-zero/

Related:  neurocomdray

NRF24L01-2.4GHz-HowTo Having two or more Arduinos be able to communicate with each other wirelessly over a distance opens lots of possibilities:Remote sensors for temperature, pressure, alarms, much moreRobot control and monitoring from 50 feet to 2000 feet distancesRemote control and monitoring of nearby or neighborhood buildingsAutonomous vehicles of all kinds These are a series of 2.4 GHz Radio modules that are all based on the Nordic Semiconductor nRF24L01+ chip. (Details) The Nordic nRF24L01+ integrates a complete 2.4GHz RF transceiver, RF synthesizer, and baseband logic including the Enhanced ShockBurst™ hardware protocol accelerator supporting a high-speed SPI interface for the application controller. The low-power short-range (200 feet or so)Transceiver is available on a board with Arduino interface and built-in Antenna for less than $3! See it here. NOTE! Power Problems:

Geiger Counter - Radiation Sensor Board for Arduino Contents Go to IndexManifesto The main finality of the Radiation Sensor Board for Arduino is to help people in Japan to measure the levels of radiation in their everyday life after the unfortunate earthquake and tsunami struck Japan in March 2011 and cause the nuclear radiation leakages in Fukushima. We want to give the chance to measure by themselves this levels instead of trusting in the general advises which are being broadcasted. The usage of this sensor board along with the affordable and easy to use Arduino platform helps people to get radiation values from specific places.

GSM Modem with Arduino UNO How to send an SMS using GSM Modem connected to Arduino UNO Components Required: 1. Arduino UNO 2. GSM/GPRS Modem (In this I have used SIM900 Module) Windmeter / Anemometer by Infidigm Overview The Windmeter is an anemometer designed to measure and record wind speed distribution from 0 to 17+ meters per second. It was designed for high reliability, ease of construction, and for a wide environmental range. Data is logged over a period of 30.46 days (1/12 of a year), and then saved for 11 months. The data can be retrieved with a laptop computer any time within the 12 months of logging.

An Arduino With Better Speech Recognition Than Siri The lowly Arduino, an 8-bit AVR microcontroller with a pitiful amount of RAM, terribly small Flash storage space, and effectively no peripherals to speak of, has better speech recognition capabilities than your Android or iDevice. Eighty percent accuracy, compared to Siri’s sixty.Here’s the video to prove it. This uSpeech library created by [Arjo Chakravarty] uses a Goertzel algorithm to turn input from a microphone connected to one of the Arduino’s analog pins into phonemes. From there, it’s relatively easy to turn these captured phonemes into function calls for lighting a LED, turning a servo, or even replicating the Siri, the modern-day version of the Microsoft paperclip. There is one caveat for the uSpeech library: it will only respond to predefined phrases and not normal speech. Still, that’s an extremely impressive accomplishment for a simple microcontroller.

“Airduino” Scungy Anemometer Part 2: Digital Connections and Interrupts « Keith's Electronics Blog In part 1 , I described making a propeller out of foil to measure the airflow of my air conditioning system, building an optointerruptor from an LED and a CdS photocell, and amplifying the signal to a usable level. Next, I needed to feed the signal into a digital input on the Arduino. Old-school digital inputs don’t like having analog signals fed into them; but I knew from working with a PIC that some of the Arduino/ATmega pins would probably have Schmitt-trigger inputs, which have hysteresis. µSpeech The uSpeech library provides an interface for voice recognition using the Arduino. It currently produces phonemes, often the library will produce junk phonemes. Please bare with it for the time being. A noise removal function is underway. Minimum Requirements

Système Adafruit apprentissage Introducing Bluefruit EZ-Link The ultimate serial Bluetooth link & wireless Arduino programmer We are excited to add another product to our growing Adafruit Bluefruit line, this time its the Bluefruit EZ-Link: the best Bluetooth Serial Link device ever made. Like you, we have purchased all sorts of Bluetooth serial link modules, with high expectations - we just wanted something that worked!

“Airduino” Scungy Anemometer Part 1: Detection and Amplification « Keith's Electronics Blog Necessity is said to be the mother of invention, and 90+°F daily temperatures with the air conditioner on the fritz made me feel pretty inventive. Our air conditioner was low on refrigerant and the blower fan motor may be running slower than spec and not moving enough air. Between the two problems, the expansion coil inside the furnace housing would ice up, over a few hours completely blocking the airflow and preventing any meaningful heat exchange. I’d then have to switch off cooling mode and run only the fan for a few hours to melt the ice. On a weekend when I was home all day, I discovered that I could keep the house fairly cool by setting the blower fan to run all the time, manually monitoring the airflow out the vents, and cycling the AC off when airflow was restricted and back on when it opened up. Which sounded like a perfect job for a microcontroller.

Related: