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The ultimate climate change FAQ

The ultimate climate change FAQ
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Home Green versus gray: Nature's solutions to infrastructure demands - Opinion For almost a century, New York City has drawn its drinking water from the Catskill Mountains, more than 100 miles (161km) to the north. In April of 2007, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the results of a several-year review of the city's ongoing programme to maintain clean drinking water supplies with forest and open space conservation in the Catskills rather than the construction of filtration plants. The results were encouraging. The EPA concluded that as long as the city agreed to set aside $300m over the next 10 years to acquire land and restrain upstate development that causes runoff and pollution, the agency would exempt New York from having to build an $8bn filtration plant. The Catskills aqueduct has been held up as the quintessential example of green infrastructure trumping gray and has prompted cities worldwide to consider alternative solutions to the infrastructure demands of the 21st century. Many of these assets even appreciate in value over time. 1. 2.

Apps That Challenge Kids to Solve Environmental Issues By Tanner Higgin, Graphite Environmental education for most adults used to mean learning a little bit about recycling and planting some trees on Arbor Day. We didn’t delve into ecology as much as we skimmed the surface. But things have gotten more complex since then, and the topic of climate change has brought environmental education to the forefront. At its best, environmental education gets students grappling with big, cross-disciplinary issues like sustainable design and renewable energy. 1. This app provides an overview of environmental issues, particularly pollution, for younger students. 2. Enercities is a little more sophisticated than Little Green Island. 3. It’s important to learn not just about sustainability and being environmentally conscious, but also about what’s at stake in these efforts. 4. Related

WWF: Climate change Carbon dioxide, or CO2, is the most significant of the gases in our atmosphere which keep the Earth warm. 4 billion years ago its concentration in the atmosphere was much higher than today - 80% compared to today's 0.03%. But most of it was removed through photosynthesis over time. All this carbon dioxide became locked in organisms and then minerals such as oil, coal and petroleum inside the Earth's crust. A natural carbon dioxide cycle keeps the amount of CO2 in our atmosphere in balance. The amount of naturally produced CO2 is almost perfectly balanced by the amount naturally removed.

Harvest Boon Villa Welpeloo in Enschede, the Netherlands, doesn't look like a recycled building. Its austere lines and spacious interior have nothing of the junkyard aesthetic about them. Yet despite appearances, it's reused to the bones. To accomplish this, architects Jan Jongert and Jeroen Bergsma of 2012Architects reversed the typical order of the design process—first house, then materials—and instead began by scouting the local area for items to recycle. Villa Welpeloo was the architects' first house, designed for clients Tjibbe Knol and Ingrid Blans. "Reused materials account for 60 percent of the structure," says Jongert. The architects came to the idea of superuse architecture when they were student at Delft University of Technology. So when they received the commission for Villa Welpeloo (Jongert and Blans have been friends since Jongert was eight), step one was to create a "harvest map," an inventory of possible suppliers from within a nine-mile radius of the building site.

The Secret of the Seven Sisters - Oil cartel On August 28, 1928, in the Scottish highlands, began the secret story of oil. Three men had an appointment at Achnacarry Castle - a Dutchman, an American and an Englishman. The Dutchman was Henry Deterding, a man nicknamed the Napoleon of Oil, having exploited a find in Sumatra. He joined forces with a rich ship owner and painted Shell salesman and together the two men founded Royal Dutch Shell. The American was Walter C. Teagle and he represents the Standard Oil Company, founded by John D. The Englishman, Sir John Cadman, was the director of the Anglo-Persian oil Company, soon to become BP. The new automobile industry was developing fast, and the Ford T was selling by the million. That August night, the three men decided to stop fighting and to start sharing out the world's oil. Four others soon joined them, and they came to be known as the Seven Sisters - the biggest oil companies in the world. In the first episode, we travel across the Middle East, through both time and space.

Sea Level Rise Explorer - Global Warming Art From Global Warming Art Elevation Relative to Sea Level (m) Description The map shown above allows you to explore the regions of the Earth that are most vulnerable to sea level rise. As with other Google Maps, you can click-and-drag the window to scroll or double click to zoom. Potential for Sea Level Rise As global warming progresses, sea level is expected to rise primarily due to the melting of continental ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica. During the twentieth century, sea level rose 20 cm. However, even if global temperatures stabilize in 2100, the full magnitude of sea level rise is expected to take far longer to develop. Accuracy of Maps The sea level data appearing in my maps is based primarily on version 2 of NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), with post-processing by CGIAR to fill-in voids using data from other sources. The SRTM data are limited to a region of 60 S to 60 N latitude. Related Materials References ^ [abstract] [DOI] Knutti, Reto and Thomas F.

WWF: Climate Change | Threats Shop to Support WWF Shop at AmazonSmile to support our global conservation efforts every time you buy. It’s the same Amazon.com you know—same products, same prices—and 0.5% of each purchase price is donated back to WWF. Road train technology can drive your car for you - tech - 18 January 2011 Video: Road train drives your car for you Letting drivers read a book, surf the net or possibly even have a snooze while behind the wheel may not sound like the best way to improve road safety. Yet that's precisely the aim of an automatic driving system that has just been road-tested for the first time in Sweden. By linking cars together into road trains or "platoons" to form semi-autonomous convoys under the control of a professional lead driver, the hope is that average road speeds can be reduced, improving fuel consumption and cutting congestion. In a test performed late last month, Volvo, one of the partners of the Safe Road Trains for the Environment (SARTRE) Project, showed that a single car could join a platoon, be "enslaved" by a lead truck, and then exit safely. Discussions are now under way to carry out tests on public roads in Spain next year. Your sensors are mine now Would you trust it? More From New Scientist Germany's energy revolution on verge of collapse (New Scientist)

Carbon dioxide levels hit historic high - Americas The level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has broken above a symbolic threshold, 400 parts per million (ppm), for the first time, US monitors have said, indicating a record level for greenhouse gases. Climate scientists said the findings should serve as a call for action to reverse the damage caused by human activities and heavy use of polluting fossil fuels. The Earth has not had these levels of carbon dioxide in millions of years, said Bob Ward, policy and communications director at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at London School of Economics and Political Science. "We are creating a prehistoric climate in which human societies will face huge and potentially catastrophic risks," Ward said. "Only by urgently reducing global emissions will we be able to bring carbon dioxide levels down and avoid the full consequences of turning back the climate clock." 'Abrupt increase' Global temperatures hotter

Climate Change, Deforestation, Biomes and Ocean Currents, Plankton, Endangered Species - Earth Web Site Click for more detail Thermohaline Change Evidence is growing that the thermohaline current may be slowed or stopped by cold fresh water inputs to the Arctic and North Atlantic oceans. This could occur if global warming is sufficient to cause large scale melting of arctic sea ice and the Greenland ice sheet. "Diatoms (a kind of phytoplankton) are estimated to "scrub" roughly as much CO2 from the atmosphere each year as all the world's rainforests. "Net primary productivity is the mass of plant material produced each year on land and in the oceans by photosynthesis using energy from sunlight. Population and consumption growth Infrastructure development (dams, urban growth, highways) Land conversion (deforestation, agriculture, urban growth) Overharvesting / overexploitation (overfishing, wasteful irrigation) Release of pollutants (human waste, agricultural / industrial chemicals, radioactivity) Introduction of exotic species (replacing and overwhelming indigenous species). 5

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