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Leadership Styles Around The World

Leadership Styles Around The World
Different cultures can have radically different leadership styles, and international organizations would do well to understand them. British linguist Richard D. Lewis charted these differences in his book "When Cultures Collide," first published in 1996 and now in its third edition, and he teaches these insights in seminars with major corporate clients. From structured individualism in the U.S. to ringi-sho consensus in Japan, the charts seem intuitively correct, if not unilaterally true across a country. Lewis acknowledges the risks of dealing in stereotypes: "Determining national characteristics is treading a minefield of inaccurate assessment and surprising exception. There is, however, such a thing as a national norm." With permission from the author, we are posting 24 charts of leadership styles from his book, with a brief summary of his comments about each below: crossculture.com Swedish management is decentralized and democratic. German managers strive to create a perfect system.

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Leadership Styles in Different Cultures: GLOBE Findings Leadership Attributes: Universals and “Culturally Contingent” Before we explore the six culturally endorsed leadership dimensions, let’s return to the “attributes,” the many characteristics and behaviors that might be responsible for a leader’s effectiveness or lack of it. Recall from my introductory article that the researchers imposed upon themselves very stringent requirements for saying that any attribute is “universally” agreed upon as positive or negative (click here). UNIVERSAL POSITIVES: The researchers were able to identify 22 attributes that are universally regarded as positive, i.e., as contributing to outstanding leadership.

How To Tell If You're An Entrepreneur Pressed to describe the stereotypical entrepreneur, which words would you use? Passionate? Dedicated? Optimistic? Sure, those apply. This Chart Explains Every Culture In The World Cultures are complicated, and anyone attempting to explain or group them will struggle to avoid giving offense. Political scientists Ronald Inglehart of the University of Michigan and Christian Welzel of Luephana University in Germany put forth their best effort by analyzing data and plotting countries on a “culture map.” Their system stems from the World Values Survey (WVS), the largest”non-commercial, cross-national, time series investigation of human beliefs and values ever executed,” which dates back to 1981 and includes nearly 400,000 respondents from 100 countries. The latest chart, published several years ago, includes data from surveys conducted from 1995 to 1999, 2000 to 2004, and 2005 to 2009. Check it out: Wikimedia Commons

How Different Cultures Perceive Effective Leadership Cultural differences matter in leadership and the most effective leaders embrace them. In a globalised work environment, having a multinational team is becoming the norm. Whether a leader is “Eastern” or “Western” will influence how they interact with their employees. These differences can be stark and sometimes frustrating.

Jack Welch GE's 4 E and one P curve (StratoServe) This blog had discussed Jack Welch's 4E's and one P in an earlier post; given the interest among blog readers here is some more clarification about the concept. To evaluate managers GE started a system of differentiating managers on performance but were hard pressed to identify the characteristics that differentiated managers on the "Vitality" curve which is essentially a “grading” curve or graph for managers. The word "vitality" is confusing because it refers more to being vital or essential to the organization rather than being "vital" in the "having high energy" sense. In fact,"Energy" is one of the 4 E's but let's go over the 4 E's of GE leadership briefly:

What is Cultural Awareness? How Do I Develop It? Cultural Awareness is the foundation of communication and it involves the ability of standing back from ourselves and becoming aware of our cultural values, beliefs and perceptions. Why do we do things in that way? How do we see the world? Why do we react in that particular way? Cultural awareness becomes central when we have to interact with people from other cultures. People see, interpret and evaluate things in a different ways.

businessinsider How do you know if you’re a fantastic boss? Employees who love you may be a good sign—but not if they love you because you’re way too lenient. Great results, like high sales or fast project turnaround, might indicate a fantastic boss as well—but not if you’re getting great results at the expense of a healthy culture or happy team members. Here are the 12 personality traits of outstanding bosses. Check ’em out, check ’em off, and (if necessary) change your ways. Global Leadership Advancement Center 2014 GLOBAL LEADERSHIP BIBLIOGRAPHYJoyce Osland, Lucas Endowed Professor of Global LeadershipGlobal Leadership Advancement Center (GLAC)School of Global Innovation & LeadershipLucas College and Graduate School of BusinessSan Jose State University This reading list is compiled annually by GLAC. It contains both empirical research and trade books on global leadership and closely related topics. Adler, N.J. (1997).

businessinsider Most people associate a weak leader with being docile, deferential, timid or meek. While that may have some merit, weak leaders can also be bombastic, egocentric, domineering, dictatorial and imperious. Even if you are successful at adding to the bottom line, bringing in new clients or developing new products and services, if people are not seeking you out or jockeying to be on your team, you are a weak leader. Here are seven behaviors that beset a weak leader: 1. Your team routinely suffers from burnout. What value is most important to people in each country? The data above has been collected on a continuous basis by OECD Better Life Index since 2011. To date there are over 60,000 responses from over 180 countries. Interestingly, most developed nations, including USA, Canada, Western and Central European as well as Nordic countries tend to value life satisfaction and health most, countries that on the happy planet index did not rate quite as high as those in Central and South America. Why do you think is this? South America, on the other hand is the continent where education is by far the top priority in life.

Ultimate attribution error The ultimate attribution error is a group-level attribution error that offers an explanation for how one person views different causes of negative and positive behavior in ingroup and outgroup members.[1] Ultimate attribution error is the tendency to internally attribute negative outgroup and positive ingroup behaviour and to externally attribute positive outgroup and negative ingroup behaviour. So in other words, ultimate attribution error arises as a way to explain an outgroup's negative behaviour as flaws in their personality, and to explain an outgroup's positive behaviour as a result of chance or circumstance. It is also the belief that positive acts performed by ingroup members are as a result of their personality, whereas, if an ingroup member behaves negatively (which is believed to be rare), it is a result of situational factors.[2] Overview[edit] The ultimate attribution error is a systematic patterning of intergroup misattributions shaped in part by one's prejudices.

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