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Project-Based Learning vs. Problem-Based Learning vs. X-BL

Project-Based Learning vs. Problem-Based Learning vs. X-BL
At the Buck Institute for Education (BIE), we've been keeping a list of the many types of "_____- based learning" we've run across over the years: Case-based learning Challenge-based learning Community-based learning Design-based learning Game-based learning Inquiry-based learning Land-based learning Passion-based learning Place-based learning Problem-based learning Proficiency-based learning Service-based learning Studio-based learning Team-based learning Work-based learning . . . and our new fave . . . Zombie-based learning (look it up!) Let's Try to Sort This Out The term "project learning" derives from the work of John Dewey and dates back to William Kilpatrick, who first used the term in 1918. Designing and/or creating a tangible product, performance or event Solving a real-world problem (may be simulated or fully authentic) Investigating a topic or issue to develop an answer to an open-ended question Problem-Based Learning vs. Problem-based learning typically follow prescribed steps:

How Students Can Create Animated Movies to Teach Each Other | Jordan Collier Posted by Jordan Collier on January 16, 2014 in EdTech | ∞ In addition to learning our content and curriculum standards, today’s students also need to be able to do the following effectively: collaborate with one another, synthesize ideas, create content, communicate ideas clearly, and use technology. A great way to accomplish all of these learning goals is to have students create movies of classroom content (i.e., textbook) to share with each other. About a year ago, I came across this blog post to learn the ins-and-outs of using RSA-animate style movies in the classroom. Wouldn’t it be great if your students created similar videos to share with their class? Having students create RSA-animate style movies is a fun way to teach content– by having the students become the teacher. Here’s how students in your class can create their own animated movies to share… Chapter Notes (Day 1) After all the groups have been formed, assign each group a section from your textbook. Rough Draft Sketches (Day 2)

The Top 10 Reasons Students Cannot Cite or Rely On Wikipedia 10. You must never fully rely on any one source for important information. Everyone makes mistakes. All scholarly journals and newspapers contain “corrections” sections in which they acknowledge errors in their prior work. And even the most neutral writer is sometimes guilty of not being fully objective. Thus, you must take a skeptical approach to everything you read. The focus of your search should be on finding accurate information and forming a full picture of an issue, rather than believing the first thing you read. 9. 8. In March 2009, Irish student Shane Fitzgerald, who was conducting research on the Internet and globalization of information, posted a fake quotation on the Wikipedia article about recently deceased French composer Maurice Jarre. Fitzgerald was startled to learn that several major newspapers picked up the quote and published it in obituaries, confirming his suspicions of the questionable ways in which journalists use Web sites, and Wikipedia, as a reliable source.

Metacognition: Nurturing Self-Awareness in the Classroom How do children gain a deeper understanding of how they think, feel, and act so that they can improve their learning and develop meaningful relationships? Since antiquity, philosophers have been intrigued with how human beings develop self-awareness -- the ability to examine and understand who we are relative to the world around us. Today, research not only shows that self-awareness evolves during childhood, but also that its development is linked to metacognitive processes of the brain. Making Sense of Life Experiences Most teachers know that if students reflect on how they learn, they become better learners. Metacognition plays an important role in all learning and life experiences. How do I live a happy life? Through these reflections, they also begin to understand other people's perspectives. At a recent international workshop, philosophers and neuroscientists gathered to discuss self-awareness and how it is linked to metacognition. Image Credit: Marilyn Price-Mitchell 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

3 Excellent Tools to Create Interactive Posters and Visuals for Your Class February 1, 2014 Interactive visuals are great learning and teaching materials to use with your students in the classroom. From explaining difficult processes to visual brainstorming, interactive graphics are a good way to consolidate students learning and promote their comprehension. 1-Thinglink I love this web tool. 2- PiktoChart This is another wonderful web tool to create interactive visuals and posters for your Class. 3- Glogster Glogster is a social network that allows users to create free interactive posters, or Glogs.

5 Tips to Help Teachers Who Struggle with Technology "I'm not very tech savvy" is the response I usually hear from teachers that struggle with technology. Whether it's attaching a document to an email or creating a PowerPoint, some teachers really have a difficult time navigating the digital world. As schools around the globe begin to embed the use of technology in their learning environments, these teachers can be left feeling frustrated and marginalized by the new tools they are required to use but do not understand. The school where I teach is currently within its post-BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) implementation age. We started with a small cohort of tech-savvy teachers to pilot a BYOD program with selected classes. Starting small was definitely beneficial, as we were able to troubleshoot issues and best prepare ourselves for the school-wide BYOD rollout. 1. Integrating technology can be very stressful for educators that aren't familiar with it. 2. 3. 4. Create a school-wide culture of tech integration and an openness to take risks.

projet de neuroéducation Movie Sheets - Teacher Submitted Movie Worksheets for the Classroom tlc.simplek12 Share FREE webinars with your Twitter followers and you could win a pair of Bunny Slippers! It’s a #PDnPJs Sweepstakes contest – Tweet and share this page to enter. Remember to register for all of the FREE events below! Become a Google Tools Expert August 23, 2014 Engaging Your Teachers with Online Professional Development August 27, 2014 Transform Your Classroom With Google September 6, 2014

The Neuroscience Behind Stress and Learning The realities of standardized tests and increasingly structured, if not synchronized, curriculum continue to build classroom stress levels. Neuroimaging research reveals the disturbances in the brain's learning circuits and neurotransmitters that accompany stressful learning environments. The neuroscientific research about learning has revealed the negative impact of stress and anxiety and the qualitative improvement of the brain circuitry involved in memory and executive function that accompanies positive motivation and engagement. The Proven Effects of Positive Motivation Thankfully, this information has led to the development of brain-compatible strategies to help students through the bleak terrain created by some of the current trends imposed by the Common Core State Standards and similar mandates. In the past two decades, neuroimaging and brain-mapping research have provided objective support to the student-centered educational model. Neuroimaging and EEG Studies

The Design Thinking School \ What we do Design Thinking can be a powerful vehicle for deeper learning of content, more divergent thinking and building the thinking skills capacity of learners. Key to the process's success in learning, is that it provides the platform for learners to become problem finders. At a time when design thinking tends to come across as "shop" class and post-it notes, NoTosh have spent four years developing medium- and long-term professional development programmes with schools around the world, which marry design and education research with classroom practices that work in any part of curriculum. We've seen schools increase student engagement, content coverage and attainment thanks to the challenging way we frame design thinking and formative assessment, together, as a vehicle for creative and robust learning. What is design thinking? In schools, we use design thinking as a framework onto which we hang specific thinking skills to achieve specific learning tasks. Why design thinking?

Les effets de l'apprentissage et de l'enseignement sur le cerveau Vous avez probablement souvent entendu cette phrase lors d'une discussion : « La recherche sur le cerveau dit que... ». La vulgarisation et la diffusion des résultats des récentes recherches sur le cerveau nous offrent l'opportunité de revoir les grands principes pédagogiques inhérents à l'apprentissage et à l'enseignement. Les précieuses informations issues des recherches nous obligent aussi à faire des liens avec les efforts déployés pour utiliser les TIC au profit des apprentissages en classe et à la maison. « Il y a quelques années, la pertinence de s'intéresser au cerveau en éducation était plutôt limitée. Trois grandes découvertes sur le cerveau ont été présentées par Steve Masson lors de cette présentation : Découverte no 1 L'apprentissage modifie l'architecture du cerveau. Le cerveau fait preuve de plasticité tout au long de la vie. Découverte no 2 L'architecture du cerveau influence l'apprentissage. Découverte no 3 Enfin, une bonne nouvelle? Ressources :

The Importance of Asking Questions to Promote Higher-Order Competencies Irving Sigel devoted his life to the importance of asking questions. He believed, correctly, that the brain responds to questions in ways that we now describe as social, emotional, and cognitive development. Questions create the challenges that make us learn. The essence of Irv's perspective is that the way we ask questions fosters students' alternative and more complex representations of stories, events, and circumstances, and their ability to process the world in a wider range of ways, to create varying degrees of distance between themselves and the basis events in front of them, is a distinct advantage to learning. However, Irv found that schools often do not ask the range of questions children need to grow to their potential. Tell: Tell children the story by reading the text or having them read the text. Suggest: This involves providing children with choices about what might happen next or possible opinions they might have. For the story, here are some two-question rule sequences:

4 Stages Of Problem-Based Learning by Terry Heick We’ve written about inquiry-based learning in the past, as well as its mother project-based learning, and it’s aloof, hipster cousin self-directed learning. So it made sense to take a look at challenge-based learning–the process of anchoring the learning process through problems–usually local, authentic, and personal to the student. This is a kind of place-based education that takes a project-based approach that begins and ends with the student and their respective and self-examined citizenships. More on this idea soon. 16 Questions To Promote Problem-Based Learning Connect & Analyze 1. 2. 3. 4. Research & Contextualize 5. 6. 7. 8. Imagine & Design 9. 10. 11. 12. Act & Socialize 13. 14. 15. 16. 16 Questions To Promote Problem-Based Learning

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