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Project-Based Learning vs. Problem-Based Learning vs. X-BL

Project-Based Learning vs. Problem-Based Learning vs. X-BL
At the Buck Institute for Education (BIE), we've been keeping a list of the many types of "_____- based learning" we've run across over the years: Case-based learning Challenge-based learning Community-based learning Design-based learning Game-based learning Inquiry-based learning Land-based learning Passion-based learning Place-based learning Problem-based learning Proficiency-based learning Service-based learning Studio-based learning Team-based learning Work-based learning . . . and our new fave . . . Zombie-based learning (look it up!) Let's Try to Sort This Out The term "project learning" derives from the work of John Dewey and dates back to William Kilpatrick, who first used the term in 1918. Designing and/or creating a tangible product, performance or event Solving a real-world problem (may be simulated or fully authentic) Investigating a topic or issue to develop an answer to an open-ended question Problem-Based Learning vs. Problem-based learning typically follow prescribed steps:

How Students Can Create Animated Movies to Teach Each Other | Jordan Collier Posted by Jordan Collier on January 16, 2014 in EdTech | ∞ In addition to learning our content and curriculum standards, today’s students also need to be able to do the following effectively: collaborate with one another, synthesize ideas, create content, communicate ideas clearly, and use technology. A great way to accomplish all of these learning goals is to have students create movies of classroom content (i.e., textbook) to share with each other. About a year ago, I came across this blog post to learn the ins-and-outs of using RSA-animate style movies in the classroom. Wouldn’t it be great if your students created similar videos to share with their class? Having students create RSA-animate style movies is a fun way to teach content– by having the students become the teacher. Here’s how students in your class can create their own animated movies to share… Chapter Notes (Day 1) After all the groups have been formed, assign each group a section from your textbook. Rough Draft Sketches (Day 2)

3 Excellent Tools to Create Interactive Posters and Visuals for Your Class February 1, 2014 Interactive visuals are great learning and teaching materials to use with your students in the classroom. From explaining difficult processes to visual brainstorming, interactive graphics are a good way to consolidate students learning and promote their comprehension. 1-Thinglink I love this web tool. 2- PiktoChart This is another wonderful web tool to create interactive visuals and posters for your Class. 3- Glogster Glogster is a social network that allows users to create free interactive posters, or Glogs.

Movie Sheets - Teacher Submitted Movie Worksheets for the Classroom

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