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Say YES! to hoboken: DIY Purple Striped Market Tote

Say YES! to hoboken: DIY Purple Striped Market Tote
Last year I made a striped beach tote and this year I found some perfect purple striped canvas weight fabric at my local fabric outlet for only $4 a yard and knew I wanted to make another version. Would you like to learn how to make one too? Okay! Keep reading! 9. Related:  bags

Wallet-to-Tote On the Go ~ Tutorial Lorraine from ikat bag is a favorite around here… She has tons of fun tutorials on her blog and she’s joined us before with this wonderful Back to School Pencil Case tutorial. Today Lorraine shares a tutorial for a new summer essential, the On the Go Wallet-to-Tote! Construction includes three main parts: Assembling the Wallet, Assembling the Outer Bag and Making the Lining. The tote zips into a convenient wallet in this unique and handy design. From Lorraine: Hello, Everyone. I am very excited today to share this tutorial for a wallet that morphs into a tote! These little bags have been around for as long as I can remember, and I thought they’d be a useful addition to the arsenal of summer gear I stash in my car and/or purse. I have three little girls, aged 3,4 and 6, and we’ve found that summer always takes us on adventures we hadn’t planned for– detours to farmer’s markets, dancing in the rain or treasure hunting en route to the park. Part One: Assemble the Wallet:You will need: Bags

Travel Accessories: Plenty of Pockets Tote When you're on the road, doesn't it always seems to be the ordinary, everyday things you are suddenly in desperate need of: gum, nail clippers, your headphones? I get a little panicky, certain I've left behind the most obvious items... as if perhaps I'm on an arctic expedition and won't see civilization for weeks. But the opportunity for replenishment doesn't matter; I want my stuff close at hand. That's the theory behind our handsome travel tote: plenty o' pockets to stash all your stuff. We offer a full set of pattern downloads below for the tote body as well as all the pockets. We recommend using a twin needle to do the decorative stitching on this project. Our tote uses a heavy, solid-color duck for the exterior, a fabric that is readily available at numerous outlets, including this pretty 7 oz. duck in brown from Fabric. com. The finished size of the tote is approximately 12½" tall x 11½" wide with 2" deep sides and base. Contributors Storage Solutions Related Articles

Travel Accessories: Plenty of Pockets Tote - Sew4Home When you're on the road, doesn't it always seems to be the ordinary, everyday things you are suddenly in desperate need of: gum, nail clippers, your headphones? I get a little panicky, certain I've left behind the most obvious items... as if perhaps I'm on an arctic expedition and won't see civilization for weeks. But the opportunity for replenishment doesn't matter; I want my stuff close at hand. That's the theory behind our handsome travel tote: plenty o' pockets to stash all your stuff. There are four big outside pockets that wrap front and back plus a deep inside compartment (exactly deep enough for a magazine, I might add!) We offer a full set of pattern downloads below for the tote body as well as all the pockets. We recommend using a twin needle to do the decorative stitching on this project. Our tote uses a heavy, solid-color duck for the exterior, a fabric that is readily available at numerous outlets, including this pretty 7 oz. duck in brown from Fabric. com. Contributors

Carabiner Keychain Mod: Stop dropping your keys I used to keep my keys on a standard carabiner, which I could clip to my belt loop. Most of the time, that worked fine. But every so often, when I unclipped the carabiner from my belt loop, one of the key rings would slip off without me noticing. I had spare keys, so such events were really just a minor nuisance. Then, I got a car with an (exorbitantly priced) keyless entry remote. One day the inevitable happened, I reached for my keys and the ring with the remote was gone. Staring at the mangled corpse of my absurdly costly key fob, I resolved to solve my key loss problem once and for all. This project was made proudly at the i3 Detroit hackerspace.

Sewing: TriFold Floral Wallet {Tutorial & Pattern} This is the trifold wallet I made by using the embroidery with flower applique couching on it. You can get the pattern and tutorial on the embroidery work here. Design and sew this wallet only took me a night to complete (with the embroidery face ready), but begin a novice in Illustrator, drafting and finalizing the pattern took me days. It was fun playing around with Illustrator that sometimes I discovered and tried on other tools and got distracted from drawing the pattern. Finding possibilities to create and develop is my hobby and passion, that’s why I love creative handmade so much By the way, you can get the free 5 pages of printable pdf pattern for this trifold floral wallet here. Tips on cutting and ironing fusible interfacing One thing I would like to point out in this tutorial and also for many other purse and handbag sewings, always cut the interfacing in right angle against the direction of the fabric. Pages: 1 2 Get all updates via email: Highlights from Our Partners

Easy DIY transforming purse-backpack If you are anything like me, you're tired of buying stuff and using it for a few months at which point it falls apart and you need to buy a new one. That's the story with me and backpacks. They are all made out of this really easy to tear material which only lasts PART of a semester at best, before I need a new one. I've come to realize purses are made to carry small stuff but are limited as far as long journeys, whereas backpacks are made for long distances, but tear apart easy, so I thought why not combine the two? I take this backpack / purse hiking with me all the time and its lasted much longer than any of my backpacks, so I thought I'd show you how to make one! It's very simple, and took me less than 20 minutes to make.

Kid’s draughtsman’s pouch tutorial « My patchwork This idea was born of a need to keep drawing notebooks and colouring materials together when travelling. It holds up to 4 A4 notebooks (though really designed for only 3) and 24 pencils/texters. Easy to carry and just folds open. Inside Materials 24 strips of fabric measuring 1.5 x 5 inches each in rainbow colours4 different fabrics for the inside pockets, inside lining, outside, border and handlessome ribbon for the handlescalico fabric for the pencil pockets lining and the inside folder liningmedium weight interfacing Size of the bag The bag can be cusomised to your needs. To work out the sizes, you need to decide how many notebooks the inside pockets will hold. Place the notebooks on a pile and measure around the narrow part. Measure the notebook height and add 1 inch to it. This will give you the measurements for the lining, interfacing and outside fabric. As a way of example, I used 3 A4 notebooks. My pieces of fabric measure: Making the pencil rainbow pockets Square both strips. Handles Cut

How to make gift bags from newspaper When I bought something at a store recently, the clerk handed me my purchase in a bag made from a newspaper. I liked it very much and had to make some more—thus today's DIY recycled newspaper project: gift bags made from the Wall Street Journal. You can vary the dimensions, of course, but here's what I used to create a bag that's 5" tall, 4.5" wide, and 3" deep. Stack two sheets of newspaper on top of each other. This will be a two-ply bag for extra sturdiness. Cut out a rectangle that's 15.5" wide and 8.25" tall. Fold a flap 1.25" down from the top. Cut two pieces of cardstock or chipboard to 4.25" x 1", then glue them on the widest two panels just under the top fold. Put glue on the outside of the 0.5" tab and bring the left-most panel over to form the body of the bag, aligning the cut edge of the panel with the folded edge of the flap. Upend the bag so the 2" flap is now up. Put glue on both flaps and fold them inward to form the bottom of the bag.

Fully lined zippered box pouch - pattern and tutorial - it's a Pretty Modern life I love the look of a zippered box pouch...so incredibly cute. I found many tutorials on the internet, but was disappointed after making pouches following these tutorials to find that they were not fully lined; looks so much nicer when you open your pouch and there are no seams. It took me a long time to figure it out and I thought and thought and thought...then I got it♥ I don't want to keep this knowledge to myself, so here it is. I'd like to thank Jane at Projects by Jane (the only other tutorial like this that I was able to find on the internet - wish I'd found it sooner). Her photos may help you out too if mine fail to communicate properly. ♥♥♥Thanks so much! The finished pouch is 3 high x 4 wide x 7 long (inches) Here's what you need: 1 twelve inch zipper 2 10x7 inch panels for the lining (my lining fabric is the green one) 2 10x7 inch panels for the exterior (my exterior fabric is the brown floral one) 2 4x3 inch pieces of complementary fabric for the pulls at the end of the zipper

Accessories and Gifts Lil Blue Boo Living a creative Life.... You are here: Home / Accessories and Gifts Accessories and Gifts Pin It Search Lil Blue Boo Archive teasatsdtaset Return to top of page Copyright Lil Blue Boo © 2014 · InMotion Hosting for Lil Blue Boo Neck tie School Bag Got lots of neck ties lying around? Use them to make this unique bag! What you need Okay, you'll need a bunch of ties. Instructions Let’s start with the gusset/handle: you’ll need four ties: (Figure 1) Lay them out like this. Join each pair side by side with a super-wide triple zigzag stitch. (Figure 2) Just feed the ties through side by side, no “right sides together” or pinning or anything. Stitch each pair together side by side halfway up. (Figure3 ) Now you have have two pairs of ties sewn together. Just do another triple zigzag over the center of each tie following the center seam on the wrong side. (Figure 4) Now place the fat ends of the ties right sides together and stitch across with a regular straight stitch. Your gusset/strap piece is now complete! Now we are going to make the pattern for the front and back of the bag. (Figure 5) Now mark a dot at the inside points between the ties. Remove the ties and connect the dots. (Figure 6) Cut this pattern out. (Figure 7) Unfold paper – Voila!

The Perfect Gift: Yarn Ball Bookmark Created by Jane from See Jane Blog . Edited by Amy Christie. Has the weather turned cold where you live? In my neighborhood, temperatures have dropped and my instincts are to spend the day cozied up with a favorite book and favorite mug full of hot cocoa. Are you the same? I’m sure you have many fellow book worms in your neighborhood, so I thought it would be fun to create a charming little bookmark that would make a great anytime gift for anyone that needs a little fall comfort. It was actually my daughter’s clever idea to make yarn pom pom balls in the style of a bookmark. Supplies: -yarn -scissors That’s it! *Before you start, cut an 8-10 inch piece of yarn and a 15 inch piece of yarn and set it aside. To start, hold the end of the yarn in your hand, and begin wrapping the yarn around your fingers – snug but not too tight. Cut the yarn after 90 wraps, and carefully slide it off your fingers. At this point, your yarn pom pom ball should look like the picture above. Voila!

renske’s minimalist tote bag A talented seamstress with a mission, Renske Solkesz decided to create her own wardrobe after finding herself frustrated with high fashion prices. When we saw her chic and modern wardrobe creations, we asked if she’d be willing to create and share a fun accessory tutorial with us. I’m super excited about what she’s come up with: an amazing self-closing utilitarian tote! I’m a huge fan of the graphic contrast and the leather and rivet details. CLICK HERE for the full how-to after the jump! When I designed this bag, I wanted to integrate the grip/straps in a more functional way with the rest of the bag. A friend of mine called it a “yin yang bag,” which is pretty accurate, I think. Materials Tools HammerSewing machineScissorsPinsChalkMeasuring tapeIronPattern template Instructions 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Finished!

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