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Magic (paranormal)

Magic (paranormal)
Magic most commonly refers to: Magic may also refer to: Aviation[edit] DTA Magic, a French ultralight trike wingEurodisplay SR-01 Magic, a Czech ultralight aircraft Computing[edit] Film and television[edit] Literature[edit] Music[edit] Albums[edit] Songs[edit] Nautical[edit] Radio[edit] Sorted by frequency, then by city: Canada[edit] CIMJ-FM (Majic 106.1), in Guelph, CanadaCJMJ-FM (Magic 100.3), in Ottawa, Ontario, CanadaCJMK-FM (Magic 98.3), in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, CanadaCJUK-FM (Magic 99.9), in Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada United States[edit] Elsewhere[edit] Sports[edit] Magic Johnson (born 1959), American basketball player and businessmanOrlando Magic, a basketball teamWaikato Bay of Plenty Magic, a netball team Technology[edit] Other uses[edit] See also[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magic

Related:  mental disorders in the middle ages: Christian EuropeNu Age

Transcendence (religion) In religion, transcendence refers to the aspect of a god's nature and power which is wholly independent of the material universe, beyond all physical laws. This is contrasted with immanence, where a god is said to be fully present in the physical world and thus accessible to creatures in various ways. In religious experience transcendence is a state of being that has overcome the limitations of physical existence and by some definitions has also become independent of it. Witchcraft The belief in and the practice of magic has been present since the earliest human cultures and continues to have an important religious and medicinal role in many cultures today.[1] "Magic is central not only in 'primitive' societies but in 'high cultural' societies as well..

Humorism The four humors Humorism, or humoralism, is a now discredited theory of the makeup and workings of the human body, adopted by Ancient Greek and Roman physicians and philosophers, positing that an excess or deficiency of any of four distinct bodily fluids known as humors (UK: humours) in a person directly influences their temperament and health. From Hippocrates onward, the humoral theory was adopted by Greek, Roman and Persian physicians, and became the most commonly held view of the human body among European physicians until the advent of modern medical research in the nineteenth century. The four humors of Hippocratic medicine are black bile (Gk. melan chole), yellow bile (Gk. chole), phlegm (Gk. phlegma), and blood (Gk. haima), and each corresponds to one of the traditional four temperaments. A humor is also referred to as a cambium (pl. cambia or cambiums).[1]

Magic (paranormal) Magic or sorcery is an attempt to understand, experience and influence the world using rituals, symbols, actions, gestures and language.[1][2][3][4] Modern Western magicians generally state magic's primary purpose to be personal spiritual growth.[5] Modern theories of magic may see it as the result of a universal sympathy where some act can produce a result somewhere else, or as a collaboration with spirits who cause the effect.[6] The belief in and the practice of magic has been present since the earliest human cultures and continues to have an important religious and medicinal role in many cultures today.[7][8] Magic is often viewed with suspicion by the wider community, and is sometimes practiced in isolation and secrecy.[4] The word "magic" derives via Latin magicus from the Greek adjective magikos (μαγικός) used in reference to the "magical" arts of the Persian Magicians (Greek: magoi, singular mágos, μάγος), the Zoroastrian astrologer priests of the ancient Persian Empire.

Devil The Devil (from Greek: διάβολος or diábolos = slanderer or accuser)[1] is believed in many religions, myths and cultures to be a supernatural entity that is the personification of evil and the enemy of God and humankind. The nature of the role varies greatly, ranging from being an effective opposite force to the creator god, locked in an eons long struggle for human souls on what may seem even terms (to the point of dualistic ditheism/bitheism), to being a comical figure of fun or an abstract aspect of the individual human condition. While mainstream Judaism contains no overt concept of a devil, Christianity and Islam have variously regarded the Devil as a rebellious fallen angel that tempts humans to sin, if not commit evil deeds himself. In these religions – particularly during periods of division or external threat – the Devil has assumed more of a dualistic status commonly associated with heretics, infidels, and other unbelievers.

Divination This man in Rhumsiki, Cameroon attempts to tell the future by interpreting the changes in position of various objects as caused by a freshwater crab through the practice of nggàm[1] Divination (from Latin divinare "to foresee, to be inspired by a god",[2] related to divinus, divine) is the attempt to gain insight into a question or situation by way of an occultic, standardized process or ritual.[3] Used in various forms throughout history, diviners ascertain their interpretations of how a querent should proceed by reading signs, events, or omens, or through alleged contact with a supernatural agency. Divination can be seen as a systematic method with which to organize what appear to be disjointed, random facets of existence such that they provide insight into a problem at hand. Divination is dismissed by the scientific community and skeptics as being superstition. Categories[edit]

Divinity Usages[edit] Divinity as a quality has two distinct usages: Divine force or power - powers or forces that are universal, or transcend human capacitiesDivinity applied to mortals - qualities of individuals who are considered to have some special access or relationship to the divine. There are three distinct usages of divinity and divine in religious discourse: Entity[edit] In monotheistic faiths, the word divinity is often used to refer to the singular God central to that faith.

Basics This page covers some basics: what Paganism is, what religious witchcraft and Wicca are, and some other topics that will help you get your bearing. Take a look around the site if you’ve got questions (the tabs across the top link to all the index pages), but if you still can’t find an answer, you can email me through the contact form. I like questions, so chances are good you’ll get an answer. Arnaldus de Villa Nova Arnaldus de Villa Nova (also called Arnau de Vilanova, Arnaldus Villanovanus, Arnaud de Ville-Neuve or Arnaldus de Villanueva, c. 1235–1313) was an alchemist, astrologer and physician. He is credited with translating a number of medical texts from Arabic, including works by Ibn Sina (Avicenna), Qusta ibn Luqa (Costa ben Luca), and Galen.[2] Many alchemical writings, including Thesaurus Thesaurorum or Rosarius Philosophorum, Novum Lumen, and Flos Florum, are also ascribed to him, but they are of very doubtful authenticity. Collected editions of them were published at Lyon in 1504 and 1532 (with a biography by Symphorianus Campegius), at Basel in 1585, at Frankfurt in 1603, and at Lyon in 1686. Villa Nova is credited with using a Camera Obscura to project live performances for entertainment.[3] [4] He is also the reputed author of various medical works, including Breviarium Practicae. Arnaldus de Villanova

Rudolf Steiner: Never a member of any Ordo Templi Orientis Here are some interesting facts and relevant details, listed chronologically. The reader should bear in mind that, in my attempt to decipher the puzzle of the "O.T.O.-Phenomenon", there remain many unanswered questions, for the "history" of the Ordo Templi Orientis is but a "part" of the phenomenon itself. The Ancient and Primitive Rite of Memphis and Misraim Allegedly, the Aegpytian Rite of Mizraim [or Misraim] was founded in Milano/Italy in 1805 and transferred to France in 1814.

Trepanning Trepanning, also known as trepanation, trephination, trephining or making a burr hole (the verb trepan derives via Old French and therefrom via Medieval Latin from the Greek noun of relevant meaning trypanon, literally "(a) borer, (an) auger")[1][2] is a surgical intervention in which a hole is drilled or scraped into the human skull, exposing the dura mater to treat health problems related to intracranial diseases. It may also refer to any "burr" hole created through other body surfaces, including nail beds. It is often used to relieve pressure beneath a surface. A trephine is an instrument used for cutting out a round piece of skull bone. There is some contemporary use of the term. In modern eye surgery, a trephine instrument is used in corneal transplant surgery.

Bloodletting Ancient Greek painting on a vase, showing a physician (iatros) bleeding a patient Bloodletting (or blood-letting) is the withdrawal of blood from a patient to cure or prevent illness and disease. Bloodletting was based on an ancient system of medicine in which blood and other bodily fluids were regarded as "humors" that had to remain in proper balance to maintain health. In the ancient world[edit] A chart showing the parts of the body to be bled for different diseases, c.1310-1320

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