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The Body Language of Hands

The Body Language of Hands
In a post on the connection between relaxation and learning, I suggested that relaxing our hands was a good way to open our minds to new ideas. This post looks at our hands in a different way – to communicate thoughts, ideas and emotions. I will firstly introduce body language as a topic in general and then allow you to test your understanding of the meaning behind the way we use our hands. Body Language From the very first moment we begin to interact with others, our bodies are in communication. The language of hands Self confidence The way we use our hands is one way we reveal ourselves to others. A word of caution – the meaning of body language cues will differ depending on the place and purpose (context) of communication and also the words that accompany them, so listen carefully to what is being said as well as the way it is communicated. Take the quiz below to see how well you can read the body language of the hands. Body Language True or False Quiz 0 of 10 questions completed Questions: Related:  Body language, Posture & ExerciseBody LanguageBody Language

5 Tips for Better Posture | The Alexander Technique, teacher in NYC, NY. Alexander Technique Posture Tips 1. Let go of the muscles in the back of your neck. Your head will slightly rotate forward, and the crown of your head goes up. Feel your sit bones go down into the chair, while the rest of you moves up. 2. To come out of a slump, release any neck tension. In opposition to your head moving up, let your sit bones release down into the chair. 3. Slowly let your jaw open like a yawn, and make a whispered ah sound, breathing out. Then, with your lips together and teeth apart, breathe in through your nose with no sound. Your torso expands fully. 4. Let go of any extra tension in your neck and jaw. Free your neck, slowly lower your nose. Notice, and release tension in your neck, jaw, shoulders, and legs. Re-release neck tension. 5. Take 5 or 10 minutes out of your day to lie on the floor, on your back, with your head resting on a few inches of paperback books. Knees bent, and your feet on the floor. By Mark Josefsberg-Alexander Technique NYC Mark@MarkJosefsberg.com

How to Read People: Detecting Lies Have you ever wished that you could tell when someone is lying to you? Whether you’re dealing with Mike the mechanic from the local repair shop, or watching one of our beloved politicians on prime time, learning how to ferret out deception is a deserving skill in a world very unlike Pleasantville. It is in this final post on How to Read People, that I go into detail about how you can detect lies. How to Read People – Series 1. Human communication is an extremely complex exchange. There seems to be some limitation built into us whether by learning or by the design of our nervous systems, a limit that keeps our channel capacities in this general range – determined by George Miller author of The Magical Number Seven. Because of our apparent limitation in conscious processing, the average Joe can only detect lies with about 50% accuracy. If you have any hesitation in ever meeting me, for fear that I’ll unveil your deepest secrets, let it be known that I haven’t yet reached this level.

Getting It Straight: Posture and its Influence on Learning and Memory Can your lack of posture be the reason you are not learning and remembering efficiently? This question has been a point of debate for a while and we still have not come up with a clear answer. If it were up to teachers, the answer would probably be yes, pointing to slouching as a clear sign of student disinterest. Learning style researcher Dunn and Dunn has suggested that being “uncomfortable” engages the left side of the brain which is active in when we take in new information. The suggestion seems to be that when you remember something you are also reminded of the “state” of learning, a concept that not only includes posture but also emotions and surrounding environment. The question then seems to be that, if posture is actually affecting the way we learn, is it really such a detrimental factor? The reality probably lies somewhere in between these two ideas of state-dependent and cognitive learning and memory.

Body Mind And Modem: One-Point You see, one-point is not an invention of Aikido. It was a discovery made by Aikido practitioners. Now, Aikido (and it's related exercises) may very well be the best way to discover one-point and reinforce it's feeling. But one-point is not owned by Aikido. It is just a natural part of being a human being. So now we'll give away the secret, and tell you just where one-point is located: It's about two inches below your navel, within your lower abdomen. It's hard to say exactly why this this is the best place to concentrate your mind. Stand with your feet side by side, about shoulder width apart. Have your friend place one hand just below your collar bone, and gently push toward your spine. Now stand the same way again. You will find that when you keep one-point, you are harder to move. That's a fascinating thing about one-point. This really comes in handy. Several of these ki tests are demonstrated in the Cool Ki Tricks section of this site.

8 Easy Bodily Actions That Transform Mental Performance Jump for joy, confuse for creativity, relax for better decisions, open up for pain tolerance and more… People tend to assume that body language just expresses how we feel inside. But it also works the other way: how we hold our bodies affects how we feel and think in all sorts of fascinating ways. One of the early studies found that people who put pens in their mouths in such a way that it activates the muscles responsible for smiling, actually experienced more pleasure. In the past few years the study of how bodily posture affects the mind has exploded. Here are 8 of the latest psychological studies on what psychologists call ‘embodied cognition’, or the intimate ways in which body feeds back to mind. 1. Feeling powerful can be useful but too much power can have a weird effect on decision-making. If you just want your decisions confirmed, then a feeling of power is good. 2. There’s little doubt that people tend to associated lower voices with more power. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. → Want more?

5 Body Postures That May Actually Boost Your Self-Esteem Wisdom tells us that the body is not worth as much as our inner being. However, it is our body that bridges the world into our soul. It is the means that nurtures our being not only by what our environment shows us. It is also affected by the way we choose to move and act our bodies. Try to be aware of your body posture in different environments: How do you sit up at the family dinner table? Do you see any difference or any pattern? Kellogg School of Management described these helpful postures as those that open up the body and take up space. It was reported that these positions activate a sense of power and produces behavioral changes in a person regardless of his role in an organization. Here are 5 body postures that will fire up your confidence and performance. Stand or Sit Up Straight (Done Always)Straighten up your back from shoulders to hips. Your body connects to your brain and emotions. Start raising your self-esteem by the movements of your body.

Want to Lean In? Try a Power Pose - Amy J.C. Cuddy by Amy J.C. Cuddy | 10:00 AM March 20, 2013 For women who may be “leaning out,” Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg’s urging to “lean in” requires some behavioral changes and deviations from how many women are expected to or accustomed to behaving. Fortunately, we have the power to do this for ourselves, through tiny tweaks that actually reconfigure our brains in ways that may make us more assertive, confident, relaxed, risk tolerant, and fearless. Recent experimental psychology from Dana Carney, Pranjal Mehta, Robert Josephs, Jennifer Lerner, Gary Sherman, and our lab at Harvard suggests that the best leaders — both male and female — seem to have relatively high testosterone, which is linked to decreased fear and increased tolerance for risk and desire to compete, and low cortisol, which is linked to decreased anxiety.

Body Language of the Hands “Among all species, our human hands are unique -- not only in what they can accomplish, but also in how they communicate. Human hands can paint the Sistine Chapel, pluck a guitar, maneuver surgical instruments, chisel a David, forge steel, and write poetry. They can grasp, scratch, poke, punch, feel, sense, evaluate, hold and mold the world around us. Our hands are extremely expressive; they can sign for the deaf, help tell a story, or reveal our innermost thoughts.” (“ What Every Body is Saying , ” Harper Collins) No other species has appendages with such a remarkable range of capabilities. And yet if you asked most people about the nonverbals ( body language ) of the hands, they would be hard pressed to tell you all the things the hands reveal. It is interesting that our brain gives a disproportionate amount of attention to the fingers, and hands, as compared to the rest of the body. Our human need to see hands is so important you can try a simple experiment. .

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