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The Shadow Scholar - The Chronicle Review

The Shadow Scholar - The Chronicle Review
By Ed Dante Editor's note: Ed Dante is a pseudonym for a writer who lives on the East Coast. Through a literary agent, he approached The Chronicle wanting to tell the story of how he makes a living writing papers for a custom-essay company and to describe the extent of student cheating he has observed. In the course of editing his article, The Chronicle reviewed correspondence Dante had with clients and some of the papers he had been paid to write. In the article published here, some details of the assignment he describes have been altered to protect the identity of the student. The request came in by e-mail around 2 in the afternoon. I've gotten pretty good at interpreting this kind of correspondence. I told her no problem. It truly was no problem. I've written toward a master's degree in cognitive psychology, a Ph.D. in sociology, and a handful of postgraduate credits in international diplomacy. You've never heard of me, but there's a good chance that you've read some of my work.

http://chronicle.com/article/The-Shadow-Scholar/125329/

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