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Transition Towns

Transition Towns
A transition town is a grassroot community project that seeks to build resilience in response to peak oil,[1] climate destruction, and economic instability. Local projects are usually based on the model's initial '12 ingredients' and later 'revised ingredients'.[2][3] The first initiative to use the name was Transition Town Totnes, founded in 2006. The movement is an example of socioeconomic localisation. The term, "transition town", was coined by Louise Rooney[4] and Catherine Dunne. The transition model can be applied to any place where people live. The generic term is "transition initiative", even though "transition town" is in common usage.[2] Between late 2006 and early 2007 the Transition Network was founded as a UK charity. The Transition Network website contains a listing of the initiatives that have registered there.[6] While the focus and aims remain the same, the methods used to achieve these vary. In the United States, transition initiatives have sprung up in many communities.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transition_Towns_(network)

Related:  ALTER WORLDThe Great TransitionFACEBOOKED!

Scenario planning Scenario planning, also called scenario thinking or scenario analysis, is a strategic planning method that some organizations use to make flexible long-term plans. It is in large part an adaptation and generalization of classic methods used by military intelligence. The original method was that a group of analysts would generate simulation games for policy makers. Community organizing Characteristics[edit] Organized community groups attempt to influence government, corporations and institutions, seek to increase direct representation within decision-making bodies, and foster social reform more generally. Where negotiations fail, these organizations quickly seek to inform others outside of the organization of the issues being addressed and expose or pressure the decision-makers through a variety of means, including picketing, boycotting, sit-ins, petitioning, and electoral politics. Organizing groups often seek out issues they know will generate controversy and conflict, this allows them to draw in and educate participants, build commitment, and establish a reputation for winning.[2] Thus, community organizing is predominately focused on more than just resolving specific issues.

Transition Management (Governance) Transition management is an alternative model of environmental governance which seeks to guide the gradual, continuous process of transformation of socio-political landscapes, socio-technical practices and “the structural character of society” from one equilibrium to another.[1][2][3] In its application, transition management seeks to steer the outcome of change to lessen inherent uncertainty, produce desirable social outcomes and enhance resilience during the transformation of socio-technical systsms (ibid).This is primarily achieved by engaging a wide range of stakeholders over the multiple levels to create shared visions and goals which are then tested for practicality through the use of experimentation, learning and adaptation at the niche level. The model is often discussed in reference to sustainable development and the possible use of the model as a method for change. Key principles to transition management as a form of governance:[4]

Community engagement This article is about grassroots community benefit efforts. For governmental community benefit efforts, see public engagement Community engagement refers to the process by which community benefit organizations and individuals build ongoing, permanent relationships for the purpose of applying a collective vision for the benefit of a community. While community organizing involves the process of building a grassroots movement involving communities, community engagement primarily deals with the practice of moving said communities towards change, usually from a stalled or otherwise similarly suspended position. Origins[edit] Community engagement can trace its roots to the concept of community benefit, a term that grew out of an English common law concept, articulated in an 1891 legal decision that defined four types of charitable organizations:trusts for the advancement of education; trusts for the advancement of religion; and trusts for other purposes beneficial to the community.[1]

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is a scientific intergovernmental body under the auspices of the United Nations,[1][2] set up at the request of member governments.[3] It was first established in 1988 by two United Nations organizations, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), and later endorsed by the United Nations General Assembly through Resolution 43/53. Membership of the IPCC is open to all members of the WMO and UNEP.[4] The IPCC is chaired by Rajendra K. Pachauri.

Civil society The term civil society has a range of meanings in contemporary usage. It is sometimes considered to include the family and the private sphere, and referred to as the "third sector" of society, distinct from government and business.[1] Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon defines civil society as 1) the aggregate of non-governmental organizations and institutions that manifest interests and will of citizens or 2) individuals and organizations in a society which are independent of the government.[2] Sometimes the term is used in the more general sense of "the elements such as freedom of speech, an independent judiciary, etc, that make up a democratic society" (Collins English Dictionary).[3] Volunteering is often considered a defining characteristic of the organizations that constitute civil society, which in turn are often called NGOs, or NPOs.

Can We Prevent the Next Bubble? It’s been three years since the collapse of the last economic bubble, so it’s probably time to start worrying about the next one. Sure enough, commentators are increasingly concerned about gold bubbles, “tech 2.0″ bubbles and venture capital bubbles. To be clear, I know nothing about any of these bubbles; this post isn’t about the virtues of a Groupon IPO or the true value of precious metals. Instead, I’m interested in the persistence of all bubbles. Why are they so inevitable?

Environmental governance Environmental governance is a concept in political ecology and environmental policy that advocates sustainability (sustainable development) as the supreme consideration for managing all human activities—political, social and economic.[1] Governance includes government, business and civil society, and emphasizes whole system management. To capture this diverse range of elements, environmental governance often employs alternative systems of governance, for example watershed-based management.[2] It views natural resources and the environment as global public goods, belonging to the category of goods that are not diminished when they are shared.[3] This means that everyone benefits from for example, a breathable atmosphere, stable climate and stable biodiversity. Public goods are non-rivalrous—a natural resource enjoyed by one person can still be enjoyed by others—and non-excludable—it is impossible to prevent someone consuming the good (breathing). Definitions[edit] Challenges[edit]

Participation (decision making) Michel Fanoli - Politics in an Oyster House Dedicated To HB Latrobe Esq - Walters 93145 Participation in social science refers to different mechanisms for the public to express opinions - and ideally exert influence - regarding political, economic, management or other social decisions. Participatory decision making can take place along any realm of human social activity, including economic (i.e. participatory economics), political (i.e. participatory democracy or parpolity), management (i.e. participatory management), cultural (i.e. polyculturalism) or familial (i.e. feminism). Sherry Arnstein discusses eight types of participation in A Ladder of Citizen Participation (1969).

Stockholm Environment Institute The Stockholm Environment Institute, or SEI, is a non-profit, independent research and policy institute specialising in sustainable development and environmental issues.[2] Mission[edit] SEI's mission is to "support decision-making and induce change towards sustainable development around the world by providing integrative knowledge that bridges science and policy in the field of environment and development."[2]

Stakeholder engagement Stakeholder engagement is the process by which an organisation involves people who may be affected by the decisions it makes or can influence the implementation of its decisions. They may support or oppose the decisions, be influential in the organization or within the community in which it operates, hold relevant official positions or be affected in the long term. Involving stakeholders in decision-making processes is not confined corporate social responsibility (CSR) processes.

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