background preloader

Mobile Learning: 50+ Resources & Tips

I believe mobile devices will transform education. This is why I created a free ebook, Effective Mobile Learning: 50+ Quick Tips & Resources with helpful tips and several resources to help support this trend. One reason is because mobile devices are designed in a way that forces the teacher to give control to the learner. When we equip a classroom with iPads, iPods, small tablets, or cellphones the learning is literally put in the hands of the students. The teacher has to facilitate and walk around the room to manage the learning. Below are a list of 50+ Mobile Learning resources & growing! Mobile Learning Free Ebooks Mobile Learning Posts/Presentations I’ve Given Mobile Learning LiveBinder of Resources Mobile Learning Mindmap of Implementation This mindmap is full of case studies, schools, teachers, free ebooks, and more to show real examples of mobile learning at its best.

http://teacherrebootcamp.com/resources/mobile-learning-50-resources-tips/

Related:  Mobile Learning ESLESL/ TESOL mobile learningBYOTEdu

MobileLearning Presentation brought to you by American TESOL! Check out their other video presentations! Click here for the resources, post & recording Talking Tom - Kids talk to Tom and he repeats everything said with a funny voice, pet him to make him purr, pour a glass of milk for him, and poke his head, belly or feet, grab his tail. mobile learning Well like a lot of people I’ve bought an iPad over the summer and I’ve been having my first taste of shopping for apps to extend the capabilities of the iPad. I’ve also been having a look at how some of these can be used for language learning, so I thought I would share with you a little bit of information about the first few apps I’ve tried. ForvoFor those of you who don’t know Forvo, it’s a marvelous pronunciation dictionary site which is collecting together audio examples of of the pronunciation of different words from languages and speakers all round the world. The app works as a simple pronunciation dictionary which you can carry with you in class and whenever a new word comes up, you can get an example pronunciation form it. For many of the more common words in English you can get multiple examples from different speaker (male, female, UK, US, Australian etc.)

BYOT: No Internet Access, No Problem Posted by Shelly Terrell on Wednesday, April 3rd 2013 Part of the Mobile Learning Series! “The principle goal of education in schools should be creating men and women who are capable of doing new things, not simply repeating what other generations have done.” ~ Jean Piaget I have been traveling throughout Slovenia and Croatia for the past month training teachers in integrating Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT) effectively with their classes. I was very fortunate to have the opportunity to teach various classes of teens throughout the two countries to show teachers how BYOT works. For the days I was teaching the students, these schools lifted their policies and allowed the students to use their devices as a way of getting technology in the schools.

Brain Games What can you do to help your brain stay sharp? A lot! These five steps may help keep our minds limber and healthy! How to find apps: The Great App Checklist Last summer at the Apple developer conference, WWDC, we learned that there were more than 1.2 million apps in the Apple App Store alone. That's a lot of choices. In a sea that large, understanding how to find apps for the classroom can be challenging. In speaking with numerous educators, we learned that most app downloads result from a colleague's recommendation (i.e., word of mouth) or from choosing the first app in the search results. These are both sound strategies given the limited time educators have to explore each new app.

 Archive  I wanted to take a closer look at the iPad Evaluation I previously blogged about in Evaluating Apps with Transformative Use in Mind. The section of Content and Components deserved a closer look and explanation. You can download the PDF file of the iPad App Evaluation for the Classroom with the following sections of evaluation included: ConsiderationsContent & ComponentsLogisticsFluencySubstitution vs Transformation Model (based on SAMR model of Ruben Puentedura and Alan November‘s work)Evidence of Learning (based on conversation with Stephen Wilmarth)

Lesson Plans There is a lot of evidence to prove that sustained silent reading is exceedingly beneficial both inside and outside the classroom and a key advantage of mobile devices is the ease with which students can have access to rich reading resources. Additionally, it is also possible to follow the written word on the page, whilst listening to an oral rendition of the text. This is particularly important to students whose mother tongue is written in a script that is not the Roman Alphabet and as in the case of Arabic, does follow the same spelling rules. Vowels are often not represented in written Arabic,: and thus students forget to incorporate them into their written English. Our institution subscribes to the Oxford Bookworms Series of Graded Readers for EFL students. I would like to share some of the activities I have done with my students using this online reading resource and other digital programmes.

BYOT: The hidden messages I have been very fortunate to see Bring Your Own Technology — BYOT — in action in schools in various countries, with learners of various economic backgrounds. While teaching in the U.S., Germany, Greece, Slovenia and Croatia, I used BYOT to teach my learners with technology when little to no technology was available to us. I have integrated BYOT with learners from the ages of 4 to 80 who came from various economic situations. BYOT integration worked effectively with all these groups. BYOT worked so well in each of these cases for four reasons: we planned/prepared, were flexible, had an open discussion with students and did not tie ourselves to one platform or Internet access. The problem with integrating most technology is that schools and teachers rely too much on Internet access.

How to use Rubrics Rubrics are a way to assess work using criteria. The assessor sets up a series of statements that reflect the different levels of criteria fulfilment and then assesses the work using a rubric grid. From version 2.2 moodle supports rubric grading. This requires several steps, explained below. This guide uses Assignment for the rubric grading example.

Related:  Year 12 Form Time