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Fairleigh Dickinson PublicMind Poll Shows Fox News Viewers Less Informed on Major News Stories

Fairleigh Dickinson PublicMind Poll Shows Fox News Viewers Less Informed on Major News Stories
You probably entered the URL thinking you were going to a witty, counterintuitive take on some current news topic. Instead you find yourself disappointed to be reading this 404 page, which means our system couldn’t retrieve the article you sought. But this is actually great news. Did you really want to read whatever it was you were looking for? Let's face it: Whatever article you thought you were going to read, you had probably already anticipated the arguments in your head. Instead of reading it, you can just imagine what it was going to be like and get back to work.

http://www.slate.com/articles/briefing/slate_fare/2013/09/you_have_reached_a_404_page_3.html

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Phone hacking: News of the World reporter's letter reveals cover-up Rupert Murdoch, James Murdoch and their former editor Andy Coulson all face embarrassing new allegations of dishonesty and cover-up after the publication of an explosive letter written by the News of the World's disgraced royal correspondent, Clive Goodman. In the letter, which was written four years ago but published only on Tuesday, Goodman claims that phone hacking was "widely discussed" at editorial meetings at the paper until Coulson himself banned further references to it; that Coulson offered to let him keep his job if he agreed not to implicate the paper in hacking when he came to court; and that his own hacking was carried out with "the full knowledge and support" of other senior journalists, whom he named. The claims are acutely troubling for the prime minister, David Cameron, who hired Coulson as his media adviser on the basis that he knew nothing about phone hacking. Goodman's letter is dated 2 March 2007, soon after he was released from a four-month prison sentence.

'I'm spiritual but not religious' is a cop-out By Alan Miller, Special to CNN Editor’s note: Alan Miller is Director of The New York Salon and Co-Founder of London's Old Truman Brewery. He is speaking at The Battle of Ideas at London's Barbican in October. The increasingly common refrain that "I'm spiritual, but not religious," represents some of the most retrogressive aspects of contemporary society. Global Imbalances and Domestic Inequality - Kemal Derviş Exit from comment view mode. Click to hide this space WASHINGTON, DC – Despite years of official talk about addressing global current-account imbalances, they remained one of the world’s main economic concerns in 2011. Global imbalances were, to be sure, smaller overall than before the crisis, but they did not disappear.

Wall Street Confesses to Bonus Culture’s Ills: William D. Cohan Imagine if you could hear directly, albeit anonymously, from the normally secretive bankers and traders who manufactured and sold the trillions of dollars in toxic debt securities that pushed the world’s financial system to the brink of disaster in 2008. Would they defend themselves and their actions, or show a degree of remorse for what they caused and have not been held accountable for? Well, you can find the answer to that question in “Conversations With Wall Street,” a compact -- and largely overlooked -- book by Peter Ressler and Monika Mitchell published last year by FastPencil Premiere, in Campbell, California. Ressler and Mitchell worked together at a Wall Street executive search firm that specialized in finding senior people for fixed-income trading departments.

Roger Ailes' Secret Nixon-Era Blueprint for Fox News I'm pretty sure that the United States of America had its greatest rise (in the recent era) during the Reagan administration, who was a Republican (and he brought peace with the Russians, let's not forget). I'm also pretty sure that referring to the Bush jr administration, and more specifically one chapter in that administration, AND bringing in race as a cheap shot (Bush is quite stupid, but seriously, are you calling him a racist? ...low... ), is not the way to review the history of a party.

Different Takes: Should we abandon idea of hell? Editor’s note: The new documentary "Hellbound?" explores Americans' ideas about hell. We asked two prominent Christians who featured in the film to give us their very different takes on hell. My Faith: The dangerous effects of believing in hell On fairy tales about inequality In Jason DeParle’s New York Times article today, it appears that some folks are claiming that the inequality that Occupy Wall Street has called attention to is a thing of the past and of no concern, all because income inequality declined during the recession between 2007 and 2009. Bunk! That decline is the result of the stock market decline and the very same trend occurred in the early 2000s recession only to end with inequality reestablishing and exceeding its previous heights by 2007 (as DeParle quoted Jared Bernstein saying in the article. Go Jared!). Wage and salary data show wage inequality rising from 2009 to 2010 (recovering more than a third of lost ground), suggesting that it is too early to shed crocodile tears for the top 1 percent. Regardless of last year’s trend, it remains the case that income inequality in 2009 was still substantially greater than it was in the late 1970s.

The Incentive Bubble Photograph: Joe Costa/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images: Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade, 1939 The past three decades have seen American capitalism quietly transformed by a single, powerful idea—that financial markets are a suitable tool for measuring performance and structuring compensation. Stock instruments for managers and high-powered incentive contracts for investors have dramatically altered the nature and level of incentives and relative rewards in our society, on both sides of the capital market. In 1990 the equity-based share of total compensation for senior managers of U.S. corporations was 20%. By 2007 it had risen to 70%. Meanwhile, the investment management industry has been transformed by the rise of private equity firms and hedge funds, both of which prominently feature market-based compensation as the basis of their supposed virtue.

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