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8 Strategies for Teaching Academic Language

8 Strategies for Teaching Academic Language
"Change your language and you change your thoughts." -- Karl Albrecht Understanding Academic Language Academic language is a meta-language that helps learners acquire the 50,000 words that they are expected to have internalized by the end of high school and includes everything from illustration and chart literacy to speaking, grammar and genres within fields. Think of academic language as the verbal clothing that we don in classrooms and other formal contexts to demonstrate cognition within cultures and to signal college readiness. There are two major kinds: instructional language ("What textual clues support your analysis?") Where to Start It would be a mistake to think that academic language is a garbage pail category involving any word, depending on the context. Teaching Academic Language 8 Specific Strategies 1. Reading and then thinking and talking about different genres is a robust sequence for learning academic language. 2. 3. 4. "The topic of my presentation is ______." 5. 6. 7. 8. Related:  teaching englishEd Theory/Practice

Improving the formality of students’ writing – nominalisation | theplenary This blogging lark is really tricky to get off the ground! First of all, there is the inevitable dilemma about the topic for your first blog post and the ensuing self-doubt. Why would anybody care about what I write? Then, just when you develop an inkling of confidence, another blogger touches on your treasured subject matter or, just as your forefinger hovers over the ‘publish’ button, you are overwhelmed by the wit and worth of someone else’s writing. So, in order to overcome these psychological barriers and my own hesitation, I thought I’d better just get stuck in and hope people will be kind. So, the purpose of this occasional blog will be no more than to record some lesson ideas I have used or might use in future. Those who were involved will know that there was a cracking discussion on #literacychat last week, which explored the impact of talk for writing and methods which had a positive impact on students’ levels of formality. Learning objective: Nominalisation Activate: Demonstrate:

5 Ways to Make Class Discussions More Exciting Classroom discussions have been a staple of teaching forever, beginning with Socrates. I have taught using discussions, been a student in discussions, and observed other teachers' discussions thousands of times -- at least. Some have been boring, stifling or tedious enough to put me to sleep. Others have been so stimulating that I was sad to see them end. The difference between the two is obviously how interesting the topic is, but equally important is the level of student participation. It's not enough for students to simply pay attention -- they need to be active participants to generate one of those great discussions that end far too quickly for both the teacher and students. The best discussions keep everyone active, either by sharing or thinking. 1. Just the name "lightning round" suggests energy. 2. When you ask a discussion question, call on students by letting them catch a ball. 3. 4. Keep each question going longer by engaging more students in the discussion. 5.

Express 9.15 - Supporting Effort by Pairing Rubrics with Checklists Supporting Effort by Pairing Rubrics with Checklists Cynthia Kube In my position as a gifted resource teacher, I often see students struggle with the planning required for a challenging task. Too often, they have only a vague idea of what is required and are easily overwhelmed by the effort involved. It is crucial for teachers to carefully construct a task rubric and explicitly review it with their students, clearly delineating performance level criteria. As Kay Burke explains in her book Balanced Assessment: From Formative to Summative (2010), checklists can be used as thinking tools to provide students with a self-monitoring strategy. Checklists not only serve as a self-assessment for students, but can also be used as a formative assessment by teachers, as well as a tool for feedback. Thinking tools such as rubrics and checklists have an important place in the sequence of teaching and learning. Reference Burke, K. (2010). ASCD Express, Vol. 9, No. 15.

70 useful sentences for academic writing Back in the late 90s, in the process of reading for my MA dissertation, I put together a collection of hundreds of sentence frames that I felt could help me with my academic writing later on. And they did. Immensely. After the course was over, I stacked my sentences away, but kept wondering if I could ever put them to good use and perhaps help other MA / PhD students. So here are 70 sentences extracted and adapted for from the original compilation, which ran for almost 10 pages. This list is organized around keywords. Before you start:1. Arguea. Claima. Data a. Debate a. Discussion a. Evidence a. Grounda. Issue a. Premisea. Researcha.This study draws on research conducted by ___.b. If you found this list useful, check out The Only Academic Phrasebook You’ll Ever Need, which contains 600 sentences, as well as grammar and vocabulary tips.

40 Useful Words and Phrases for Top-Notch Essays 17.7KGoogle +202 1702 2322 25 August, 2014 The secret to a successful essay doesn’t just lie in the clever things you talk about and the way you structure your points. To be truly brilliant, an essay needs to utilise the right language. General explaining Let’s start by looking at language for general explanations of complex points. 1. Usage: “In order to” can be used to introduce an explanation for the purpose of an argument. Example: “In order to understand X, we need first to understand Y.” 2. Usage: Use “in other words” when you want to express something in a different way (more simply), to make it easier to understand, or to emphasise or expand on a point. Example: “Frogs are amphibians. 3. Usage: This phrase is another way of saying “in other words”, and can be used in particularly complex points, when you feel that an alternative way of wording a problem may help the reader achieve a better understanding of its significance. Example: “Plants rely on photosynthesis. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

8 Idioms to tell someone to “shhh” or be quiet Do you ever have the need to tell someone to be quiet? In some situations, you might have to tell people to quieten down and stop talking just before someone is about to speak (in a presentation, a meeting or conference) or a play is about to start in the theatre. In those instances, you would politely ask people to stop talking. However, there are many more situations when you don’t want to politely ask the person or people to stop talking, especially if they have really annoyed you or you are fed up with the noise they’re making or the things they are saying. In which case, the idioms below would come in extremely useful! It’s a lot easier to be polite than impolite in a foreign language no matter how proficient you are in that language. So, I wouldn’t expect you to be able to use these idioms naturally especially when angry, impatient or irritated. And what better way to do this than to share this fabulous infographic prepared by Kaplan International. Kaplan International English 2.

MET Project :: Welcome Story Map The Story Map interactive includes a set of graphic organizers designed to assist teachers and students in prewriting and postreading activities. The organizers are intended to focus on the key elements of character, setting, conflict, and resolution development. Students can develop multiple characters, for example, in preparation for writing their own fiction, or they may reflect on and further develop characters from stories they have read. After completing individual sections or the entire organizer, students have the ability to print out their final versions for feedback and assessment. The versatility of this tool allows it to be used in multiple contexts. Grades K – 2 | Lesson Plan | Standard Lesson Collaborative Stories 1: Prewriting and Drafting Students hone their teamwork skills and play off each other's writing strengths as they participate in prewriting activities for a story to be written collaboratively by the whole class. Grades K – 2 | Lesson Plan | Unit back to top

12 Useful Websites to Improve Your Writing by Johnny Webber 1. Words-to-Use.com – A different kind of thesaurus. 2. OneLook.com – One quick dictionary search tool. 3. 4. 5. 750words.com – Write three new pages every day. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 50 "Best Practices" for language teachers 50 “Best Practices” For Language Teachers “It’s a funny thing. The more I practice, the luckier I get.” - Arnold Palmer Through practice and experience teachers get better. Here are my 50 suggestions for being the best teacher one can be. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. More ….. 9. 10. More ….. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. More ….. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. More …. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. Here are a few other posts related to “being a great teacher”. What makes great teachers great? It’s the small things that count. The 7 deadly sins of new teachers Read more with these articles and resources. Join the conversation at

Updated Padagogy Wheel Tackles The Problem Of Motivation In Education One of the biggest problems at the core of education is motivation. That’s according to the newest iteration of the popular Padagogy Wheel (pad for iPad instead of ‘ped’agogy) we showcased a couple weeks ago. Allan Carrington spent what must be counless hours thinking, revising, and refining the wheel you see below which is now at version 3.0. Be sure to click here to view version 2.0 of the wheel and click here to view version 1.0. What’s New In The Padagogy Wheel Version 3.0 The new version tackles a major question that is lurking in the back of everyone’s mind. So why yet another version only one week later? How It Works Start at the center. But it’s not how it has to be. Do you ever wonder how schools, universities, colleges, and large groups in general should use social media?

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