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The urban guide to being self sufficient'ish

The urban guide to being self sufficient'ish
This is an easy recipe to follow and creates a delightful, if not usual tasting beer. It is very cheap to make and follows a traditionally english recipe. Before hops were widely used in the 17th century all sorts of plant were used to flavor the ale including nettles.(Urtica dioica). It was also thought to help alleviate rheumatic pain, gout and asthma. Nettle beer has become more popular in recent years (we would like to think we helped influence that!). Ingredients 900grams (2lb) young nettle tops 3.8lts (1 gallon) of water 230 grams (8oz) of sugar, brown or demarrara sugar works best. 7.5 grams (0.25oz) of fresh yeast small piece of toast 7.5 grams (0.25oz) of ground ginger Method Boil the nettle tops in the water for half an hour (you will need a very large pan for this or preferably a cauldron). Keeping the mixture, strain and add sugar, stirring to dissolve. Spread the yeast onto the toast and float on the surface of the nettle liquid. False Economy Small Space and small budget Leaves

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The Self Sufficient Blog The Self Sufficient Blog is my mini-journal about self sufficent farm living. It... -- keeps you up-to-date on new information and what others are doing to become more self sufficient. ---New methods and creative approaches to farm living. -- keeps you up-to-date with other postings or news about self sufficient farm living --Join my blog and become more self sufficent by clicking on the orange button to subscribe. 10 Simple, Cheap Home Gardening Innovations to Set You on the Path to Food Independence Alex Pietrowski, Staff WriterWaking Times The issue of food quality and food independence is of critical importance these days, and people are recognizing just how easy and fun it is to grow your own food at home. When renegade gardener Ron Finley said, “growing your own food is like printing money,” he was remarking on the revolutionary nature of re-establishing control over your health and your pocket book as a means of subverting the exploitative and unhealthy food systems that encourage the over-consumption of processed and fast foods. Thanks to the internet, the availability of parts and materials, and good old-fashioned ingenuity, there is a wide range of in-home, and in-apartment, gardening systems that are easy to construct and maintain, and that can provide nutritious, organic, and low-cost food for you and your family.

Completely Free, Detailed Seed Saving How-To for All Common Garden Vegetables Vegetable Seed Saving Handbook Amaranth Amaranthus spp. Natural Hebicide How Weed Killers Work Weed killers, both homemade and commercial products, start by killing the above ground foliage. Systemic weed killers, like Roundup, are designed to cause injury to the entire plant including the root system so it will not grow back, according to a guide prepared by the University of California available here. How to Build a Square Foot Garden Update! Check out our new Square Foot Gardening Infographic for even more tips, diagrams, a plant list and much more. I recently stumbled upon a book (All New Square Foot Gardening: Grow More in Less Space! by Mel Bartholomew) with an interesting gardening method called square foot gardening, and decided we would give it a try. I’ve always thought the idea of having a vegetable garden would be a lot of fun.

Build this open source DIY wind turbine for $30 Getting started with home wind energy projects can set you back a pretty penny if you buy a finished product, but if you're a little bit handy and don't mind scrounging for materials and getting creative in the garage or backyard, you can try your hand at building one of these DIY wind turbines for about $30 in materials. After all, it is #iheartrenewables week! We've previously covered Daniel Connell's open source concentrated solar collector plans, but now he's back with another great DIY renewable energy project, a vertical axis wind turbine based on the Lenz2 lift+drag design. How to Grow 100 Pounds of Potatoes in 4 Square Feet On many occasions, we've been tempted to grow our own potatoes. They're fairly low maintenance, can be grown in a pot or in the ground, last a fairly long time if stored properly, and can be very nutritious (high in potassium and vitamin C). Here's more incentive: according to this article, you can grow 100 pounds of potatoes in 4 sq. feet. Learn how after the jump... According to this article from the Seattle Times, potatoes planted inside a box with this method can grow up to 100 pounds of potatoes in just 4 square feet. All that is required:

Seven Vegetables You Can Harvest in Winter We tend to think of plants developing their edible crops in the spring and summer. This seems intuitive given that spring is associated with new life after the harsher conditions of winter, and the fact that many animal species give birth to their young in the spring, giving them the maximum time to feed up and grow before the relative privations of the colder months of the year. And indeed, many crops are ready for harvest in the warmer times, with the longer days giving them more sunshine and so energy to ripen. But there are also plenty of vegetables that can be harvested in fall and winter, including some of the most nutritious of all veggies. Incorporating some of the following plants into your permaculture design will ensure you have access to fresh vegetables throughout much of the year, and that you have a diverse and nutritious range of ingredients for your kitchen.

Vermiculture: How To Build A Worm Bin the Cheap and Easy Way By Gaye Levy Contributing Writer for Wake Up World A couple of weeks ago I wrote about using worms to create compost. The official term for this is “Vermicomposting” and the great thing about it is that it is clean and tidy and does not take up a lot of space. For folks that have small yards or live in apartments, this is ideal. Vertical Gardening : Milkbottles As enviroschools, recycling and re-using is part of what we do on a daily basis. Here is what we did with our empty milk bottles and homegrown seedlings from our potting shed to liven up our tin shed wall at Tawa Montessori ... * With thanks to Juliet from "I am a teacher, get me OUTSIDE here!" and the Creative Star Learning Company for the idea! - Anja

DIY Solar Air Heating Collectors: Pop Can vs Screen Absorbers Search The Renewable Energy site for Do-It-Yourselfers Page Contents: The test collectors: Pop can collector on left and screen collector on right How 1 MILLION Pounds Of Organic Food Can Be Produced On 3 Acres By Andy Whiteley Co-Founder of Wake Up World The quality and accessibility of our food supply is a mounting issue today. With GMOs, chemical pesticides and low-nutrition processed foods now commonplace in the mainstream supply, taking control of your own food supply is one of the smartest things you can do – for your health and for your hip pocket. So, with limited space, how can we create an independent food supply?

Spring Vegetable Planting Dates Something happened to our link to this document (Thank you for letting us know!), so I'm re-posting it here. This is a chart that Jamey created and it's what we use to know when to plant. You might not be able to see the entire chart here (depending on your screen size), so please right-click on the image and save it to your computer, then print it out because you'll want to write dates on it.

Beginner’s Guide to Veganic Gardening Vegan-organic gardening avoids not only the use of toxic sprays and chemicals, but also manures and animal remains. Just as vegans avoid animal products in the rest of our lives, we also avoid using animal products in the garden, as fertilizers such as blood and bone meal, slaughterhouse sludge, fish emulsion, and manures are sourced from industries that exploit and enslave sentient beings. As these products may carry dangerous diseases that breed in intensive animal production operations, vegan-organic gardening is also a safer, healthier way to grow our food. In veganic growing situations, soil fertility is maintained using vegetable compost, green manures, crop rotation, mulching, and other sustainable, ecological methods. Occasional use of lime, gypsum, rock phosphorus, dolomite, rock dusts and rock potash can be helpful, but we try not to depend on these fertilizers as they are non-renewable resources.

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