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George Soros

George Soros
Soros is a well-known supporter of progressive-liberal political causes.[11] Between 1979 and 2011, Soros gave away over $8 billion to human rights, public health, and education causes.[12] He played a significant role in the peaceful transition from communism to capitalism in Eastern Europe (1984–89)[8] and provided one of Europe's largest higher education endowments to Central European University in Budapest.[13] Soros is also the chairman of the Open Society Foundations. Early life[edit] The Jewish Council asked the little kids to hand out the deportation notices. I was told to go to the Jewish Council. And there I was given these small slips of paper ... It said report to the rabbi seminary at 9 am ... Soros did not return to that job, but instead went into hiding the next day. Soros emigrated to England in 1947 and became an impoverished student at the London School of Economics.[22] While a student of the philosopher Karl Popper, Soros worked as a railway porter and as a waiter.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Soros

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Bilderberg Group The Bilderberg Group, Bilderberg conference, Bilderberg meetings or Bilderberg Club is an annual private conference of approximately 120 to 140 invited guests from North America and Europe, most of whom are people of influence.[1][2] About one-third are from government and politics, and two-thirds from finance, industry, labour, education and communications.[1] Origin[edit] The original conference was held at the Hotel de Bilderberg in Oosterbeek, Netherlands, from 29 to 31 May 1954. Credit default swap If the reference bond performs without default, the protection buyer pays quarterly payments to the seller until maturity If the reference bond defaults, the protection seller pays par value of the bond to the buyer, and the buyer transfers ownership of the bond to the seller In the event of default the buyer of the CDS receives compensation (usually the face value of the loan), and the seller of the CDS takes possession of the defaulted loan.[1] However, anyone can purchase a CDS, even buyers who do not hold the loan instrument and who have no direct insurable interest in the loan (these are called "naked" CDSs).

Alan Greenspan Alan Greenspan (/ˈælɨn ˈɡriːnspæn/; born March 6, 1926) is an American economist who served as Chairman of the Federal Reserve of the United States from 1987 to 2006. He currently works as a private adviser and provides consulting for firms through his company, Greenspan Associates LLC. First appointed Federal Reserve chairman by President Ronald Reagan in August 1987, he was reappointed at successive four-year intervals until retiring on January 31, 2006 after the second-longest tenure in the position. Greenspan came to the Federal Reserve Board from a successful consulting career. Early life and education[edit] Greenspan was born in the Washington Heights area of New York City.

Global warming Global mean land-ocean temperature change from 1880 to 2014, relative to the 1951–1980 mean. The black line is the annual mean and the red line is the 5-year running mean. The green bars show uncertainty estimates. Consumer debt In recent years, an alternative analysis might view consumer debt as a way to increase domestic production, on the grounds that if credit is easily available, the increased demand for consumer goods should cause an increase of overall domestic production. The permanent income hypothesis suggests that consumers take debt to smooth consumption throughout their lives, borrowing to finance expenditures (particularly housing and schooling) earlier in their lives and paying down debt during higher-earning periods. Both domestic and international economists have supported a recent upsurge in South Korean consumer debt, which has helped fuel economic expansion. On the other hand, credit card debt is almost unknown just across the sea in Japan and China, because of long-standing cultural taboos against personal debt. Theoretical underpinnings aside, personal debt is on the rise, particularly in the United States and the United Kingdom.

Chemtrail conspiracy theory A high-flying jet leaving a condensation trail (contrail) According to the chemtrail conspiracy theory, some trails left in the sky by high-flying aircraft are chemical or biological agents deliberately sprayed for sinister purposes undisclosed to the general public.[1] Believers in the theory argue that airplanes don't leave long-lasting contrails under normal conditions,[2] but their arguments have been dismissed by the scientific community: such trails are simply normal water-based contrails (condensation trails) which are routinely left by high-flying aircraft under certain atmospheric conditions.[3] Although proponents have attempted to prove that the claimed chemical spraying does take place, their analyses have been flawed or based on misconception.[4][5] Overview Multiple persistent contrails

Government debt Government debt (also known as public debt, national debt and sovereign debt)[1][2] is the debt owed by a central government. (In federal states, "government debt" may also refer to the debt of a state or provincial, municipal or local government.) By contrast, the annual "government deficit" refers to the difference between government receipts and spending in a single year, that is, the increase of debt over a particular year. Government debt is one method of financing government operations, but it is not the only method.

Raw milk History of raw milk and pasteurization[edit] Humans consumed raw milk exclusively prior to the Industrial Revolution and the invention of the pasteurization process in 1864. During the Industrial Revolution large populations congregated into urban areas detached from the agricultural lifestyle. Pasteurization was first used in the United States in the 1890s after the discovery of germ theory to control the hazards of highly contagious bacterial diseases including bovine tuberculosis and brucellosis that was thought to be easily transmitted to humans through the drinking of raw milk.[2] Initially after the scientific discovery of bacteria, no product testing was available to determine if a farmer's milk was safe or infected, so all milk was treated as potentially contagious. Pasteurization is widely used to prevent infected milk from entering the food supply.

External debt Map of countries by external debt as a percentage of GDP The chart depicts the share of US gross external debt by debtors. [1] External debt (or foreign debt) is that part of the total debt in a country that is owed to creditors outside the country. Biological warfare There is an overlap between BW and chemical warfare, as the use of toxins produced by living organisms is considered under the provisions of both the Biological Weapons Convention and the Chemical Weapons Convention. Toxins and psychochemical weapons are often referred to as midspectrum agents. Unlike bioweapons, these midspectrum agents do not reproduce in their host and are typically characterized by shorter incubation periods.[2] Overview[edit] Offensive biological warfare, including mass production, stockpiling and use of biological weapons, was outlawed by the 1972 Biological Weapons Convention (BWC). The rationale behind this treaty, which has been ratified or acceded to by 165 countries as of 2011, is to prevent a biological attack which could conceivably result in large numbers of civilian casualties and cause severe disruption to economic and societal infrastructure.

GROSS DEBT DEFINITION GROSS DEBT, generally, is the sum total of an entities debt obligations. In corporate finance, it is usually comprised of debt financing, irrespective of its maturity, i.e. medium and long-term (various borrowings due in more than one year that have not yet been repaid) and short-term bank or financial borrowings (portion of long-term borrowings due in less than one year, discounted notes (same technique as discounting of bills of exchange), bank overdrafts, etc.). BUSINESS TRANSACTION see TRANSACTION. VISUAL-FIT METHOD is a cost estimation method where an analyst examines a cost by plotting points on a graph (called a scatter diagram) and places a line through the points to yield a cost function. This method is more objective than the account-classification method, but it is still lacking because two cost analysts could (and likely would) visually fit different lines.

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