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Guide rapide de la GPLv3 - Projet GNU

Guide rapide de la GPLv3 - Projet GNU
by Brett Smith [This article is also available in PDF and reStructuredText formats.] After a year and a half of public consultation, thousands of comments, and four drafts, version 3 of the GNU General Public License (GPLv3) was finally published on June 29, 2007. While there's been a lot of discussion about the license since the first draft appeared, not many people have talked about the benefits that it provides developers. We've published this guide to fill that gap. We'll start with a brief refresher on free software, copyleft, and the goals of the GPL. The Foundations of the GPL Nobody should be restricted by the software they use. the freedom to use the software for any purpose,the freedom to change the software to suit your needs,the freedom to share the software with your friends and neighbors, andthe freedom to share the changes you make. When a program offers users all of these freedoms, we call it free software. Protecting Your Right to Tinker Clarifying License Compatibility

http://www.gnu.org/licenses/quick-guide-gplv3.html

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Licence publique générale GNU, v3.0 - Projet GNU - Free Software Foundation (FSF) Version 3, 29 June 2007 Copyright © 2007 Free Software Foundation, Inc. < Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies of this license document, but changing it is not allowed. Preamble Free software is a matter of liberty, not price As our society grows more dependent on computers, the software we run is of critical importance to securing the future of a free society. Free software is about having control over the technology we use in our homes, schools and businesses, where computers work for our individual and communal benefit, not for proprietary software companies or governments who might seek to restrict and monitor us. The Free Software Foundation exclusively uses free software to perform its work. The Free Software Foundation is working to secure freedom for computer users by promoting the development and use of free (as in freedom) software and documentation—particularly the GNU operating system—and by campaigning against threats to computer user freedom like Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) and software patents. Our Core Work

The GNU Manifesto The GNU Manifesto (which appears below) was written by Richard Stallman at the beginning of the GNU Project, to ask for participation and support. For the first few years, it was updated in minor ways to account for developments, but now it seems best to leave it unchanged as most people have seen it. Since that time, we have learned about certain common misunderstandings that different wording could help avoid. Footnotes added since 1993 help clarify these points. For up-to-date information about the available GNU software, please see the information available on our web server, in particular our list of software.

Pourquoi l'« open source » passe à coté du problème que soulève le logiciel libre by Richard Stallman When we call software “free,” we mean that it respects the users' essential freedoms: the freedom to run it, to study and change it, and to redistribute copies with or without changes. This is a matter of freedom, not price, so think of “free speech,” not “free beer.” These freedoms are vitally important. They are essential, not just for the individual users' sake, but for society as a whole because they promote social solidarity—that is, sharing and cooperation. The History of Tux the Linux Penguin - Wikiid [Tux] "...looks too much like Homer Simpson" -- Albert Cahalan. ...Just when you thought that Tux was about as cute as he could possibly be... Thanks to Paul and Eleya Frields for these photos of Evelyn-the-Penguin. So cute!

Pourquoi vous ne devriez pas utiliser la LGPL pour votre prochaine bibliothèque - Projet GNU The GNU Project has two principal licenses to use for libraries. One is the GNU Lesser GPL; the other is the ordinary GNU GPL. The choice of license makes a big difference: using the Lesser GPL permits use of the library in proprietary programs; using the ordinary GPL for a library makes it available only for free programs. Which license is best for a given library is a matter of strategy, and it depends on the details of the situation. At present, most GNU libraries are covered by the Lesser GPL, and that means we are using only one of these two strategies, neglecting the other. So we are now seeking more libraries to release under the ordinary GPL.

What is free software? This page is maintained by the Free Software Foundation's Licensing and Compliance Lab. You can support our efforts by making a donation to the FSF. Have a question not answered here? Check out some of our other licensing resources or contact the Compliance Lab at licensing@fsf.org. The Free Software Definition What is Copyleft? Copyleft is a general method for making a program (or other work) free, and requiring all modified and extended versions of the program to be free as well. The simplest way to make a program free software is to put it in the public domain, uncopyrighted. This allows people to share the program and their improvements, if they are so minded.

Pourquoi les écoles doivent utiliser exclusivement du logiciel libre - Projet GNU - Free Software Foundation (FSF) Education → In Depth → Why Schools Should Exclusively Use Free Software by Richard Stallman Educational activities, including schools of all levels from kindergarten to university, have a moral duty to teach only free software. All computer users ought to insist on free software: it gives users the freedom to control their own computers—with proprietary software, the program does what its owner or developer wants it to do, not what the user wants it to do. Free software also gives users the freedom to cooperate with each other, to lead an upright life. These reasons apply to schools as they do to everyone. untitled MOZILLA PUBLIC LICENSE Version 1.1 --------------- 1. Definitions. 1.0.1. "Commercial Use" means distribution or otherwise making the Covered Code available to a third party. 1.1.

About the GNU Operating System [Other historical and general articles about GNU.] GNU was launched by Richard Stallman (rms) in 1983, as an operating system which would be put together by people working together for the freedom of all software users to control their computing. rms remains the Chief GNUisance today. The primary and continuing goal of GNU is to offer a Unix-compatible system that would be 100% free software. Not 95% free, not 99.5%, but 100%.

The Legacy of Linus Torvalds: Linux, Git, and One Giant Flamethrower Linus Torvalds. Photo: Jon Snyder/Wired Linus Torvalds created Linux, which now runs vast swathes of the internet, including Google and Facebook. And he invented Git, software that’s now used by developers across the net to build new applications of all kinds. But that’s not all Torvalds has given the internet. He’s also started some serious flame wars.

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