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Augmenting Human Intellect: A Conceptual Framework - 1962 (AUGMENT,3906,) 

Augmenting Human Intellect: A Conceptual Framework - 1962 (AUGMENT,3906,) 
4. Structuring an Argument3b6 "If we want to go on to a higher-level capability to give you a feeling for how our rebuilt capability hierarchy works, it will speed us along to look at how we might organize these more primitive capabilities which I have demonstrated into some new and better ways to set up what we can call an 'argument.' This refers loosely to any set of statements (we'll call them 'product statements') that represents the product of a period of work toward a given objective. Confused? Well, take the simple case where an argument leads to a single product statement. "You usually think of an argument as a serial sequence of steps of reason, beginning with known facts, assumptions, etc., and progressing toward a conclusion. "Conceptually speaking, however, an argument is not a serial affair. "Let's actually work some examples. "You notice how you wandered down different short paths, and criss-crossed yourself a few times?" You don't know. 5.

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