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Constructive Alignment - and why it is important to the learning process

Constructive Alignment - and why it is important to the learning process
What is Constructive Alignment? Constructive Alignment, a term coined by John Biggs (Biggs, 1999) is one of the most influential ideas in higher education. It is the underpinning concept behind the current requirements for programme specification, declarations of Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) and assessment criteria, and the use of criterion based assessment. There are two parts to constructive alignment: Students construct meaning from what they do to learn. The teacher aligns the planned learning activities with the learning outcomes. The basic premise of the whole system is that the curriculum is designed so that the learning activities and assessment tasks are aligned with the learning outcomes that are intended in the course. Figure 1. Alignment is about getting students to take responsibility for their own learning, and establishing trust between student and teacher. Achieving Constructive Alignment Figure 2. Define the learning outcomes. Setting the Learning Outcomes Source

http://exchange.ac.uk/learning-and-teaching-theory-guide/constructive-alignment.html

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The Teacher's Guide To Flipped Classrooms Since Jonathan Bergman and Aaron Sams first experimented with the idea in their Colorado classrooms in 2004, flipped learning has exploded onto the larger educational scene. It’s been one of the hottest topics in education for several years running and doesn’t seem to be losing steam. Basically, it all started when Bergman and Sams first came across a technology that makes it easy to record videos. They had a lot of students that regularly missed class and saw an opportunity to make sure that missing class didn’t mean missing out on the lessons. Once students had the option of reviewing the lessons at home, the teachers quickly realized the shift opened up additional time in class for more productive, interactive activities than the lectures they’d been giving. And voila: a movement began.

Toward a common definition of "flipped learning" - Casting Out Nines We’ve seen a significant ramping up of interest in – and exposure to – the flipped/inverted classroom over the last few years, and it’s been nice to see an uptick in the amount of research being done into its effectiveness. But one thing that’s been lacking has been a consensus on what the flipped classroom actually is. If a professor assigns readings to do before class and then holds discussions in class, is that “the flipped classroom”? I’ve said in the past that it is not (necessarily), but that’s just me. Now, however, a group of educators and others interested in flipped learning are proposing a common definition of flipped learning, and it’s pretty interesting. Their definition of flipped learning goes like this:

Selecting Technologies This page helps you choose among various technologies (not just LMSs) using two approaches: examples of learning outcomes, the kinds of learning activities that could achieve those outcomes, and how those activities could be supported by various learning technologies examples of the tools you may be interested in using and the types of activities and learning outcomes that are likely to be relevant. Table 1: Sample learning outcomes, rationales and activities The following table provides examples of learning outcomes, the kinds of learning activities that promote those outcomes, and how the activities could be supported by learning technologies. Table 2: Tools related to activities, and their contribution to learning outcomes The following table provides examples of the tools you may be interested in using and looks at the types of activities and learning outcomes that are likely to be relevant.

UNSW Teaching Staff Gateway This page helps you choose among various technologies (not just LMSs) using two approaches: examples of learning outcomes, the kinds of learning activities that could achieve those outcomes, and how those activities could be supported by various learning technologies examples of the tools you may be interested in using and the types of activities and learning outcomes that are likely to be relevant. Table 1: Sample learning outcomes, rationales and activities

Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives One of the most widely used ways of organizing levels of expertise is according to Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. (Bloom et al., 1994; Gronlund, 1991; Krathwohl et al., 1956.) Bloom's Taxonomy (Tables 1-3) uses a multi-tiered scale to express the level of expertise required to achieve each measurable student outcome. Organizing measurable student outcomes in this way will allow us to select appropriate classroom assessment techniques for the course. There are three taxonomies. Which of the three to use for a given measurable student outcome depends upon the original goal to which the measurable student outcome is connected.

4 Steps to Constructively Align your Course Step 1: Define the intended outcomes (The Objectives) The first step of constructive alignment is to define what the students must learn and the depth of understanding required for each topic. It is important that the student does not only acquire knowledge of the subject, but can also put this knowledge to use. The Teacher's Quick Guide To Digital Scavenger Hunts If you’ve got a smartphone or a tablet in your classroom, you’re ready for the adventure to begin! By adventure I mean, of course, the world of active learning through digital scavenger hunts. In this hunt, students are tasked with finding a particular physical object, person, or place and have to use technology to track it down. Note: an ‘online scavenger hunt’ usually implies that you’re hunting around online and not physically with classmates. For the purpose of this article, I’m focusing on the physical version I’ve dubbed ‘digital scavenger hunts’.

Why educators can't live without social media From student recruitment to alumni relations, social media has a place at every step of the student journey, says Eric Stoller. Institutions and educators ignore it at their peril. Communication is at the core of the human experience. How we learn, teach and engage is predicated on our ability to communicate with one another, and technology-based services have added layers of complexity, efficiency, innovation, and disruption to how we do this. Choosing the Best Technology UAF eLearning Instructor Training Online Grow Skills Share your resources or thoughts with us. Use #iTeach as your tag! Choosing the Best Technology Print Friendly The Rapid eLearning Blog - Practical, real-world tips for e-learning success. Creating great interactive learning experiences requires a few core building blocks: relevant content, pull versus push, and real-world decisions. With those building blocks you're able to structure effective learning scenarios that are meaningful to the learner and helps meet the objectives of the course. One of those building blocks in creating relevant content or content that is placed in a meaningful context. Essentially, you want to recreate the types of scenarios that are similar to the ones the learner has in real life.

Learning Theory.html <table width=90% cellpadding=10><tr><td bgcolor=ff4447><span><h1>WARNING:</h1><b>JavaScript is turned OFF. None of the links on this concept map will <br />work until it is reactivated. <p><a href=" If you need help turning JavaScript On, click here. </a></p></b></td></tr></table> This Concept Map, created with IHMC CmapTools, has information related to: Learning Theory, zone of proximal development The area of capabilities that learners can exhibit with support from a teacher or peer., organisational learning Nonaka & Takeuchi, Montessori constructivism, Lave & Wenger situated learning, Piaget constructivism, Philosophy Dewey, The church Theology, text & conversation theory An organization is created and defined by communication. communication "is" the organization and the organization exists because communication takes place., Learning Theory Learning Theory v6 is a hypertextual concept map of established learning theories 30th April 2013.

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