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Catalog Reveals NSA Has Back Doors for Numerous Devices

Catalog Reveals NSA Has Back Doors for Numerous Devices
Editor's note: This article accompanies our main feature story on the NSA's Tailored Access Operations unit. You can read it here. When it comes to modern firewalls for corporate computer networks, the world's second largest network equipment manufacturer doesn't skimp on praising its own work. According to Juniper Networks' online PR copy, the company's products are "ideal" for protecting large companies and computing centers from unwanted access from outside. They claim the performance of the company's special computers is "unmatched" and their firewalls are the "best-in-class." Despite these assurances, though, there is one attacker none of these products can fend off -- the United States' National Security Agency. A 50-Page Catalog These NSA agents, who specialize in secret back doors, are able to keep an eye on all levels of our digital lives -- from computing centers to individual computers, and from laptops to mobile phones. Master Carpenters 'Persistence'

http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/catalog-reveals-nsa-has-back-doors-for-numerous-devices-a-940994.html

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The NSA Uses Powerful Toolbox in Effort to Spy on Global Networks In January 2010, numerous homeowners in San Antonio, Texas, stood baffled in front of their closed garage doors. They wanted to drive to work or head off to do their grocery shopping, but their garage door openers had gone dead, leaving them stranded. No matter how many times they pressed the buttons, the doors didn't budge. The problem primarily affected residents in the western part of the city, around Military Drive and the interstate highway known as Loop 410. In the United States, a country of cars and commuters, the mysterious garage door problem quickly became an issue for local politicians. Ultimately, the municipal government solved the riddle.

Canvas Fingerprinting: How to Stop the Web's Sneakiest Tracking Tool in Your Browser Canvas Fingerprinting: How to Stop the Web's Sneakiest Tracking Tool in Your Browser Canvas fingerprinting is the web's trickiest privacy threat, but it's not impossible to stop. With all the media attention it's gotten lately, it's time we lay out exactly how to detect and prevent this invasive tracking technique. What Is Canvas Fingerprinting & Who Uses It? There used to be a day when sites tracked your behavior through cookies, but that day is over. Since web users have become increasingly aware of how to delete and block cookies, companies have come up with a more candid and difficult-to-stop tracking method to deliver targeted ads, and that's canvas fingerprinting.

World's leading authors: state surveillance of personal data is theft More than 500 of the world's leading authors, including five Nobel prize winners, have condemned the scale of state surveillance revealed by the whistleblower Edward Snowden and warned that spy agencies are undermining democracy and must be curbed by a new international charter. The signatories, who come from 81 different countries and include Margaret Atwood, Don DeLillo, Orhan Pamuk, Günter Grass and Arundhati Roy, say the capacity of intelligence agencies to spy on millions of people's digital communications is turning everyone into potential suspects, with worrying implications for the way societies work. They have urged the United Nations to create an international bill of digital rights that would enshrine the protection of civil rights in the internet age. Julian Barnes, Martin Amis, Ian McEwan, Irvine Welsh, Hari Kunzru, Jeanette Winterson and Kazuo Ishiguro are among the British authors on the list. McEwan told the Guardian: "Where Leviathan can, it will.

Facebook, the CIA, and You. // Brainsturbator After over a decade of being immersed in the conspiracy theory culture—and I’m still there wether I like it or not—my core beef remains the same. It’s not something unique to conspiracy research. It’s a universal problem with all true believers: exaggeration for dramatic effect.

EFF: "Everything we know about NSA spying" from 30C3 The Electronic Frontier Foundation's Kurt Opsahl -- a brillliant digital civil liberties attorney who has been suing the US government and the NSA over spying since 2006 -- took to the stage at the 30th Chaos Communications Congress in Hamburg this week to explain in clear and simple language the history of NSA spying. Kurt lays out the tortured legal history of American bulk surveillance, showing how an interlocking set of laws, policies, lies and half-truths have been used to paper over an obviously, grossly unconstitutional program of spying without court oversight or particular suspicion. If you're mystified by the legal shenanigans that led up to the Snowden and Manning leaks, this is where you should start.

N.S.A. Devises Radio Pathway Into Computers Photo WASHINGTON — The National Security Agency has implanted software in nearly 100,000 computers around the world that allows the United States to conduct surveillance on those machines and can also create a digital highway for launching cyberattacks. While most of the software is inserted by gaining access to computer networks, the N.S.A. has increasingly made use of a secret technology that enables it to enter and alter data in computers even if they are not connected to the Internet, according to N.S.A. documents, computer experts and American officials.

Did spying take Copenhagen from Hopenhagen to Brokenhagen? To those interested in trying to stop — or at least slow down — climate change, the 2009 Climate Change Summit in Copenhagen, which was dubbed “Hopenhagen” before it began, is remembered today as “Brokenhagen.” The summit’s failure to come to any kind of agreement was a key factor in pushing climate change activists away from working within governmental channels and towards direct action fights, like Keystone. Why did Brokenhagen happen? Was it just a clash of expectations?

NSA surveillance: how to stay secure Now that we have enough details about how the NSA eavesdrops on the internet, including today's disclosures of the NSA's deliberate weakening of cryptographic systems, we can finally start to figure out how to protect ourselves. For the past two weeks, I have been working with the Guardian on NSA stories, and have read hundreds of top-secret NSA documents provided by whistleblower Edward Snowden. I wasn't part of today's story – it was in process well before I showed up – but everything I read confirms what the Guardian is reporting.

GCHQ and NSA targeted charities, Germans, Israeli PM and EU chief British and American intelligence agencies had a comprehensive list of surveillance targets that included the EU's competition commissioner, German government buildings in Berlin and overseas, and the heads of institutions that provide humanitarian and financial help to Africa, top-secret documents reveal. The papers show GCHQ, in collaboration with America's National Security Agency (NSA), was targeting organisations such as the United Nations development programme, the UN's children's charity Unicef and Médecins du Monde, a French organisation that provides doctors and medical volunteers to conflict zones. The head of the Economic Community of West African States (Ecowas) also appears in the documents, along with text messages he sent to colleagues.

The NSA's Secret Role in the U.S. Assassination Program Credit: Kirsty Wigglesworth/Associated Press. The National Security Agency is using complex analysis of electronic surveillance, rather than human intelligence, as the primary method to locate targets for lethal drone strikes – an unreliable tactic that results in the deaths of innocent or unidentified people. According to a former drone operator for the military’s Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC) who also worked with the NSA, the agency often identifies targets based on controversial metadata analysis and cell-phone tracking technologies. Rather than confirming a target’s identity with operatives or informants on the ground, the CIA or the U.S. military then orders a strike based on the activity and location of the mobile phone a person is believed to be using. His account is bolstered by top-secret NSA documents previously provided by whistleblower Edward Snowden.

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