background preloader

ExPASy: SIB Bioinformatics Resource Portal - Home

ExPASy: SIB Bioinformatics Resource Portal - Home

http://www.expasy.org/

Related:  molecular biology

Protein Data Bank - RCSB PDB A Structural View of Biology This resource is powered by the Protein Data Bank archive-information about the 3D shapes of proteins, nucleic acids, and complex assemblies that helps students and researchers understand all aspects of biomedicine and agriculture, from protein synthesis to health and disease. As a member of the wwPDB, the RCSB PDB curates and annotates PDB data. The RCSB PDB builds upon the data by creating tools and resources for research and education in molecular biology, structural biology, computational biology, and beyond. Use this website to access curated and integrated biological macromolecular information in the context of function, biological processes, evolution, pathways, and disease states. dip.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/dip/Download.cgi Various subsets of the DIP interaction data are available in a variety of formats: PSI-MI (versions 1.0 and 2.5), MITAB2.5 and our legacy XIN format. The sequences of the proteins participating in DIP interactions are provided in FASTA format. In addition, some more detailed information about the interactions of S.cerevisiae proteins are also provided in the form of tab-delimited files. Please note that, in general, the interaction data we offer should be customized before they are used to address any particular problem. This includes, but is not limited to, making informed choices about: Acceptable interaction types.

JCVI CMR The Comprehensive Microbial Resource (CMR) is a free tool that allows researchers to access all of the publicly available bacterial genome sequences completed to date. For each genome not sequenced at JCVI, two kinds of annotation are displayed: the Primary annotation taken from the genome sequencing center and the JCVI annotation generated by an automated annotation process at JCVI. In addition to the convenience of having all of the organisms on a single website, common data types across all genomes in the CMR make searches more meaningful and highlight differences and similarities among the genomes. Data for the CMR is stored in the Omnium database, which is a modified version of the small genome databases. The CMR on average is accessed by 20,000 unique visitors each month. Vitamins, Vitamin Table Deutsch: Gesundheits- und Fitnessrechner Here you can calculate the following informations on health and fitness topics:BMI | Ideal weight | Calorie consumption | Liquid consumption | Walking Index | Nutrition values | Vitamin table | Basic conversion | Body fat (adipose) rate | Optimal training pulse and heart rate | Protein requirement | Fat requirement | Nutrition value need | WHR - Waist to hip ratio | Drink reminder Vitamins Here you can find a detailed table of the most important vitamins. Indicated is in which food it is most, the effectiveness, what happens at deficiency and overdosing, the daily need, who has an advanced need and the qualities of the vitamins. Convert length units and weight units. © Jumk.de Webprojects | Imprint & Privacy No responsibility is taken for the correctness of these informations.

IMP Bioinformatics Group The IMP-IMBA Bioinformatics group was established in August 2007 in recognition of the growing importance of computational biology in biomedical research. We offer inter-disciplinary expertise in biocomputing and information technology. Special thanks to the for their cooperation. Sequence Analysis Protein Interaction Analysis Protein-Protein Interaction Databases The Biological General Repository for Interaction Datasets (BioGRID) database was developed to house and distribute collections of protein and genetic interactions from major model organism species. BioGRID currently contains over 198 000 interactions from six different species, as derived from both high-throughput studies and conventional focused studies. Biomolecular INteraction Network Database IntAct provides a freely available, open source database system and analysis tools for protein interaction data. All interactions are derived from literature curation or direct user submissions and are freely available.

Pfam The Human Body - A Dissection (Not for Weak Hearted People) From the tiniest veins, arteries and nerves to serial cross-sections of the spinal cord, these incredibly detailed dissections show and label most every part of the human body. The collection is the product of a 17-year collaboration between David L. Bassett, a School of Medicine alumnus and faculty member known for his elegant dissections and love for the human body, and William Gruber, the photographer who invented the View-Master stereoscopic viewing device. The partnership between the two resulted in the production of the Stereoscopic Atlas of Human Anatomy, which began in 1948, but was not not completed until 1962.

Genomes Pages The first completed genomes from viruses, phages and organelles were deposited into the EMBL Database in the early 1980's. Since then, molecular biology's shift to obtain the complete sequences of as many genomes as possible combined with major developments in sequencing technology resulted in hundreds of complete genome sequences being added to the database, including Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota. These web pages give access to a large number of complete genomes, help is available to describe the layout.

The International Molecular Exchange Consortium Curation Rules The curation rules are explained in full in the Curation Manual. Individual databases may locally impose additional rules, but these will be additional to and not break the agreed IMEx guidelines. IMEx Curation Rules_01_12.pdf Curation Requests Users may request the curation of specific papers not currently included in the IMEx data set. Circadian rhythm Some features of the human circadian (24-hour) biological clock History[edit] The earliest recorded account of a circadian process dates from the 4th century B.C.E., when Androsthenes, a ship captain serving under Alexander the Great, described diurnal leaf movements of the tamarind tree.[1] The observation of a circadian or diurnal process in humans is mentioned in Chinese medical texts dated to around the 13th century, including the Noon and Midnight Manual and the Mnemonic Rhyme to Aid in the Selection of Acu-points According to the Diurnal Cycle, the Day of the Month and the Season of the Year.[2] The first recorded observation of an endogenous circadian oscillation was by the French scientist Jean-Jacques d'Ortous de Mairan in 1729.

s BioInteractive - DNA Animations Animation Adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G), and thymine (T) are the components of nucleic acid that make up DNA. In 1950, Erwin Chargaff published a paper stating that in the DNA of any given species, the ratio of adenine to thymine is equal, as is the ratio of cytosine to guanine. This became known as Chargaff's ratio, and it was an important clue for solving the structure of DNA. Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is caused by a mutation that leads to an abnormal protein that is always active. The drug Gleevec has a shape that fits into the active site of the abnormal protein and stops its harmful effects.

Anatomy of Gene Regulation: A Three-Dimensional Structural Analysis Panagiotis A. Tsonis. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, U.K. 2003. 282 pp. $50.00. Structural biology has revolutionized the way biological questions are approached and the detail with which cellular phenomena are understood. Cystic Fibrosis - Gene Mutations and CFTR protein Located on human chromosome 7, the CFTR gene is made up of 250,000 DNA nucleotides. CFTR stands for Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator. The CFTR protein functions as a channel for the movement of chloride ions in and out of cells, which is important for the salt and water balance on epithelial surfaces, such as in the lungs or pancreas. Changes in the CFTR gene can affect the structure of the CFTR protein. As in every human gene, the DNA sequence is transcribed into a messenger molecule called mRNA. The CFTR gene has 27 segments called exons that are spliced together to make the complete mRNA message.

Related:  BioinformaticsbioinformatiqueDonnées de la recherche