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Who wrote this amazing, mysterious book satirizing tech startup culture? A mysterious little book called Iterating Grace is floating around San Francisco right now. At least a dozen people have received the book in the mail—or in my case, by secret hand-delivery to my house. (Which is a little creepy.) The artifact itself consists of a 2,001-word story interspersed with hand-drawn recreations of tweets by venture capitalists and startup people like Chris Sacca, Paul Graham, Brad Feld, Sam Altman, and others. Find Your Voice in Writing With These Tips From How to Be A Writer Whether you write fiction, nonfiction, or a blog–it’s important to have a unique voice in writing, or style. Your writing voice conveys to readers your personality and when writing fiction, can add depth to your characters and your story. Barbara Baig, author of How to Be a Writer, suggests using these tips to improve your writing voice. If you feel that you have lost your voice on the page—or never found it in the first place—don’t despair. There are ways you can find or recover it. And it’s actually much easier and safer to find your own voice in writing than in life, as long as you do it through practice writing.

25 Things Every Writer Should Know An alternate title for this post might be, “Things I Think About Writing,” which is to say, these are random snidbits (snippets + tidbits) of beliefs I hold about what it takes to be a writer. I hesitate to say that any of this is exactly Zen (oh how often we as a culture misuse the term “Zen” — like, “Whoa, that tapestry is so cool, it’s really Zen“), but it certainly favors a sharper, shorter style than the blathering wordsplosions I tend to rely on in my day-to-day writing posts. Anyway. Peruse these. Absorb them into your body. How to Write a Movie Script “Don’t You DARE Write Another Word Until You Have Read This Article!” Now Scroll DOWN..! OK… so you thought you’d write a quick screenplay, sell it for big bucks, move to Hollywood, and spend the rest of your life hanging out in a guitar-shaped swimming pool with George Clooney and Megan Fox? Let me guess. Somehow it hasn’t quite worked out like that? Let me guess again.

Creativity: How 20 Bad Ideas Can Kick-Start Your Imagination This is a guest post from Jodi McIsaac Martens. I used to think I had no imagination. None whatsoever. I wanted to have imagination, of course, and I really, really enjoyed the fruits of other people’s imaginations, but I was quite convinced I had none myself. Not exactly the ideal trait in a novelist. Expressions & Sayings Index If you prefer to go directly to the meaning and origin of a specific expression, click on its relevant entry in the alphabetical list below. Use this alphabet to speed up your search: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Setting: Using Scene To Enrich Your Writing In both fiction and nonfiction, the setting is the general background against which your story takes place—the physical location and time period, both of which influence your characters and plot. So how can a creative writer use setting and scenery to further offset, augment, or reflect the action of the plot? Although we’re going to be exploring this issue in terms of fiction, these techniques work for nonfiction as well. These craft techniques work in all genres: poetry, stories, personal essays, memoir, and books. Suppose you’re writing a novel that is set in the Deep South in 1955 and your protagonist is an immigrant facing prejudice and roadblocks at every turn. You’d have a completely different novel if your protagonist were a Texas cowboy who found himself in Mississippi at that particular time and place.

How To Create An Intriguing Inciting Incident Every single element between the first page and the very last page of a screenplay is arguably the most important, salable thing about it. In this article, the beginning of the plot takes the number one spot. However, the plot really can’t begin being awesome until it is set in motion.

How to Write a Screenplay: Script & Screenwriting Tips By Mario O. Moreno and Kay Tuxford It's easy to feel intimidated by the thought of writing a screenplay. The rules! Take a writing lesson from the B-I-B-L-E Yesterday, I told another creative writer who'd stopped in my office that I'm ruined when it comes to reading books. He stared at me quizzically. I went on to explain that now that I've studied and aimed to be a practitioner of creative writing, I can no longer experience a book the way I used to--innocently, wholly, naively. Now, anything I read is interpreted through the gimlet eye of the writer searching for craft. If no longer reading thrillers for sheer enjoyment weren't bad enough, now I can't even participate in readings from the Bible during a church service without examining the craft evident in the text.

Recently published titles 82nd & Fifth The Metropolitan Museum of Art (2013) "Abraham Lincoln: The Man (Standing Lincoln): A Bronze Statuette by Augustus Saint-Gaudens": Metropolitan Museum Journal, v. 48 (2013) Tolles, Thayer (2013) Afghanistan: Forging Civilizations along the Silk Road Aruz, Joan, and Elizabetta Valtz Fino (2012) "Amenhotep, Overseer of Builders of Amun: An Eighteenth-Dynasty Burial Reassembled": Metropolitan Museum Journal, v. 48 (2013) Reeves, Nicholas (2013)

How Does Writing Affect Your Brain? Most of us write a little something everyday. It might be a grocery list, a poem, or a write-up on the infographic of the day. As we go through this daily ritual, however, we are probably not aware of the effects writing has on our brains.

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