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Cold War Museum

Cold War Museum

http://www.coldwar.org/

Related:  Extension One English: After the BombGuerre FroideCOLD WARModern

AtomicBombMuseum.org "Nuclear disarmament has gone viral", say Sergio Duarte, UN High Representative for Disarmament Affairs and Tibor Tóth, Executive Secretary of the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). Click here for more information. In just one second, in early August, 1945, the world was changed forever. Since 1942, a secret U.S. weapons program, called the Manhattan Project, had been at work on two revolutionary bombs of such intense heat and explosive force that they would reduce the two target cities—Hiroshima and Nagasaki—to vast scorched wastelands.

Cold War Hot Links: Web Sorces Relating to the Cold War Cold War Hot Links These links are to webpages which other people have created and like most things on the net, they run the entire spectrum of political thought and vary greatly in quality. Nonetheless, they do provide web- surfers with some interesting views and information on the Cold War and the National Security State. Some Cold War Web Resources

Civil Rights Movement - Black History Severe government repression, the assassinations of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, and the intense infighting within the black militant community caused a decline in protest activity after the 1960s. The African-American freedom struggle nevertheless left a permanent mark on American society. Overt forms of racial discrimination and government-supported segregation of public facilities came to an end, although de facto, as opposed to de jure, segregation persisted in northern as well as southern public school systems and in other areas of American society. In the South, antiblack violence declined. Black candidates were elected to political offices in communities where blacks had once been barred from voting, and many of the leaders or organizations that came into existence during the 1950s and 1960s remained active in southern politics.

After the Bomb Home > English > Extension 1 > Module B: Texts and Ways of Thinking > Elective 1: After the Bomb > After the Bomb Does not my heat astound you! And my light! All by myself I am a huge camellia Glowing and coming and going, flush on flush. Sylvia Plath Fever 103 Materials prepared by David Barbara, Farrer High School US History Timeline: Cold War Before 1600 | 1600 - 1700 | 1700 - 1800 | 1800 - 1900 | 1900 - 2000 | American Revolution Timeline | Cold War Timeline 1945 Feb. Yalta Conference May World War II ends in Europe. Aug. U.S. drops an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. The Great Depression - Facts & Summary Among the programs and institutions of the New Deal that aided in recovery from the Great Depression were the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), which built dams and hydroelectric projects to control flooding and provide electric power to the impoverished Tennessee Valley region of the South, and the Works Project Administration (WPA), a permanent jobs program that employed 8.5 million people from 1935 to 1943. After showing early signs of recovery beginning in the spring of 1933, the economy continued to improve throughout the next three years, during which real GDP (adjusted for inflation) grew at an average rate of 9 percent per year. A sharp recession hit in 1937, caused in part by the Federal Reserve’s decision to increase its requirements for money in reserve. Though the economy began improving again in 1938, this second severe contraction reversed many of the gains in production and employment and prolonged the effects of the Great Depression through the end of the decade.

What Nagasaki looked like before and after the atomic bomb Nagasaki marks anniversary of atomic bombing Japan marks the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki during World War 2. Three days after levelling the city of Hiroshima with a uranium atomic bomb known as a "Little Boy", the United States dropped the more menacing-sounding "Fat Man" over Nagasaki. It was August 9, 1945. Between 40,000 and 80,000 people were killed, and much of the city was pulverised. Nuclear weapons have never again been used in warfare.

The Cold War The webserver at Alpha History tells us you’re using an adblocking tool, plug-in or browser extension on your computer or network. We understand that many people don’t like web-based advertising. Ads on websites can often be irrelevant, distracting and ‘in your face’. Without ads, however, our website would not exist – or it would not be free. Ads are how we fund the creation and delivery of our content. Post World War home | 6th-15th centuries | 16-17th centuries | 18-19th centuries | 1901 to World War II Victors, Independence Movements and Cold War The United Nations – the founding, Roosevelt's hopes denied and the veto Victors against the Defeated – retributions, expropriations, occupations The Media and Tokyo Rose – aroused passions against a fictitious enemy Empire headed for Extinction – colonialism in Asia and Africa

A Photo-Essay on the Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki A Photo-Essay on the Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki Hiroshima Hiroshima, Japanese city, situated some 8M km. (500 mi.) from Tokyo, on which the first operational atomic bomb was dropped at 0815 on 6 August 1945. Nicknamed 'Little Boy’—a reference to Roosevelt—the bomb was 3 m. (9 ft. 9 in.) long, used uranium 235, had the power of 12.5 kilotons of TNT, and weighed 3,600 kg. (nearly 8,000 lb.).

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