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Table of similar systems of comparison of temperaments

Table of similar systems of comparison of temperaments
Beginnings[edit] The Roman physician Galen mapped the four temperaments (sanguine, phlegmatic, choleric and melancholic) to a matrix of hot/cold and dry/wet, taken from the four classical elements.[1] Two of these temperaments, sanguine and choleric, shared a common trait: quickness of response (corresponding to "heat"), while the melancholic and phlegmatic shared the opposite, a longer response (coldness). The melancholic and choleric, however, shared a sustained response (dryness), and the sanguine and phlegmatic shared a short-lived response (wetness). This meant that the choleric and melancholic both would tend to hang on to emotions like anger, and thus appear more serious and critical than the fun-loving sanguine, and the peaceful phlegmatic. These are the basis of the two factors that would define temperament in the modern theory. Development[edit] This theory would also be extended to humans. These he compared to the choleric, phlegmatic, melancholic and sanguine respectively.[4] Related:  Personality typesPsychologypsychology

Type psychologique Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre. Les types psychologiques sont une typologie proposée par Carl Gustav Jung pour caractériser le mode de fonctionnement psychologique d'un sujet. Elle aboutit à distinguer seize types psychologiques, suivant la fonction cognitive dominante (quatre possibilités), son orientation introvertie ou extravertie, et l'orientation de la fonction cognitive auxiliaire sur l'axe complémentaire. Les types psychologiques de Jung doivent être vus comme des outils permettant de diagnostiquer les différences de fonctionnement psychologique entre les individus. Cette typologie a été reprise (sous une présentation différente) par la typologie du Myers Briggs Type Indicator et par celle de la Socionique. Introduction[modifier | modifier le code] Il met aussi en garde en indiquant qu'« il est assez stérile d'étiqueter les gens et de les presser dans des catégories ». L'orientation de l'énergie[modifier | modifier le code] Jugement dominant[modifier | modifier le code]

16 Personality Factors The Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire (or 16PF),[1] is a multiple-choice personality questionnaire which was developed over several decades of research by Raymond B. Cattell, Maurice Tatsuoka and Herbert Eber. Beginning in the 1940s, Cattell used the new techniques of factor analysis (based on the correlation coefficient) in an attempt to try to discover and measure the source traits of human personality (Cattell, 1946)(Nevid, 2009).[2][3] The questionnaire measures the 16 primary traits, and the Big Five secondary traits,[4][5] which have become popularized by other authors in recent years. From early in his research, Cattell found that the structure of personality was multi-level and hierarchical, with a structure of interdependent primary and secondary level traits (Cattell, 1946, 1957).[2][6] The sixteen primary factors were a result of factor-analyzing hundreds of measures of everyday behaviors to find the fundamental traits behind them. Outline of Test[edit]

Rosenhan experiment Rosenhan's study was done in two parts. The first part involved the use of healthy associates or "pseudopatients" (three women and five men, including Rosenhan himself) who briefly feigned auditory hallucinations in an attempt to gain admission to 12 different psychiatric hospitals in five different states in various locations in the United States. All were admitted and diagnosed with psychiatric disorders. After admission, the pseudopatients acted normally and told staff that they felt fine and had no longer experienced any additional hallucinations. All were forced to admit to having a mental illness and agree to take antipsychotic drugs as a condition of their release. The second part of his study involved an offended hospital administration challenging Rosenhan to send pseudopatients to its facility, whom its staff would then detect. The pseudopatient experiment[edit] I told friends, I told my family: "I can get out when I can get out. The non-existent impostor experiment[edit]

Achieve - Five Temperaments Five temperaments is a theory in psychology, that expands upon the Four Temperaments proposed in ancient medical theory. The development of a theory of five temperaments begins with the Two-factor models of personality and the work of the late William Schutz, and his FIRO-B program. It is a measure of interpersonal relations orientations that calculates a person's behavior patterns based on the scoring of a questionnaire. Although FIRO-B does not speak in terms of "temperament", this system of analysis graded questionnaires on two scales in three dimensions of interpersonal relations. History and the ancient four temperaments[edit] Five Temperament theory has its roots in the ancient four humors theory of the Greek Historian Hippocrates (460-370 BC), who believed certain human behaviors were caused by body fluids (called "humors"): blood (sanguis), [yellow] bile (cholera or Gk. χολη, kholé) black bile (μελας, melas, "black", + χολη, kholé, "bile"); and phlegm. The FIRO-B connection[edit]

How walking through a doorway increases forgetting Like information in a book, unfolding events are stored in human memory in successive chapters or episodes. One consequence is that information in the current episode is easier to recall than information in a previous episode. An obvious question then is how the mind divides experience up into these discrete episodes? A new study led by Gabriel Radvansky shows that the simple act of walking through a doorway creates a new memory episode, thereby making it more difficult to recall information pertaining to an experience in the room that's just been left behind. Dozens of participants used computer keys to navigate through a virtual reality environment presented on a TV screen. The key finding is that memory performance was poorer after travelling through an open doorway, compared with covering the same distance within the same room. But what if this result was only found because of the simplistic virtual reality environment? Radvansky, G., Krawietz, S., and Tamplin, A. (2011).

Integral Personality Personality type This article is about the generic aspects of type theory. For the book by Jung, see Psychological Types. Clinically effective personality typologies[edit] Effective personality typologies reveal and increase knowledge and understanding of individuals, as opposed to diminishing knowledge and understanding as occurs in the case of stereotyping. Types vs. traits[edit] The term type has not been used consistently in psychology and has become the source of some confusion. Type theories[edit] An early form of personality type theory was the Four Temperaments system of Galen, based on the four humours model of Hippocrates; an extended Five Temperaments system based on the classical theory was published in 1958.One example of personality types is Type A and Type B personality theory. Carl Jung[edit] One of the more influential ideas originated in the theoretical work of Carl Jung as published in the book Psychological Types. Four functions of consciousness[edit] Dominant function[edit] See also[edit]

Pharmakos A pharmakós (Greek: φαρμακός) in Ancient Greek religion was the ritualistic sacrifice or exile by the sorcerers of a human scapegoat or victim. The victims themselves were referred to as pharmakoi and the sorcerer was referred to as a pharmakon.[1] A slave, a cripple or a criminal was chosen by the pharmakon or sorcerer and expelled from the community at times of disaster (famine, invasion or plague) or at times of calendrical crisis, after being given pharmakeus or drugs by the pharmakon or sorcerer who was a practitioner of pharmakeia or pharmaceutics. It was believed that this would bring about purification. Modern interpretations[edit] Walter Burkert and René Girard have written influential modern interpretations of the pharmakos rite. Some scholars have connected the practice of ostracism, in which a prominent politician was exiled from Athens after a vote using pottery pieces, with the pharmakos custom. Pharmakos and pharmacology[edit] Notes[edit] References[edit]

Hartman Personality Profile Classifying the Motive Types[edit] The main idea behind the Hartman Personality Profile is that all people possess one of four driving "core motives."[2] The driving core motives are classified into four colors: Red, motivated by power; Blue, motivated by intimacy; White, motivated by peace; and Yellow, motivated by fun.[3] Hartman believes the system is simple and at the same time profound. Reds: The Power Wielders[edit] Reds are the power wielders of the world. Red Strengths Reds are: Action oriented, Assertive, Confident, Decisive, Determined, Disciplined, Independent, Leaders, Logical, Pragmatic, Proactive, Productive, Responsible, and Task-Dominant. Red Limitations Reds often have to be right. Blues: The Do-gooders[edit] Whites: The Peacekeepers[edit] Motivated by Peace, Whites will do anything to avoid confrontation. White Strengths Whites are kind, considerate, patient and accepting. White Limitations Whites don’t commonly share what they are feeling, understanding or seeing.

PsyArt: An Online Journal for the Psychological Study of the Arts The gestalt notion "figure-ground phenomenon" refers to the characteristic organization of perception into a figure that 'stands out' against an undifferentiated background. What is figural at any one moment depends on patterns of sensory stimulation and on the momentary interests of the perceiver. Figure-ground relationship is an important element of the way we organise reality in our awareness, including works of art. Poets may rely on our habitual figure-ground organisations in extra-linguistic reality to exploit our flexibility in shifting attention from one aspect to another so as to achieve certain poetic effects by inducing us to reverse the habitual figure-ground relationships. This flexibility has precedent in music and the visual arts. There was an old joke in Soviet Russia about a guard at the factory gate who at the end of every day saw a worker walking out with a wheelbarrow full of straw. figure-ground phenomenon. Figure and Ground in Escher Figure 2. Such artists as M.

Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Model of personality types A chart with descriptions of each Myers–Briggs personality type and the four dichotomies central to the theory The Myers–Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is an introspective self-report questionnaire with the purpose of indicating differing psychological preferences in how people perceive the world around them and make decisions.[1][2][3] The MBTI was constructed by Katharine Cook Briggs and her daughter Isabel Briggs Myers.[4] It is based on the conceptual theory proposed by Carl Jung,[5] who had speculated that humans experience the world using four principal psychological functions – sensation, intuition, feeling, and thinking – and that one of these four functions is dominant for a person most of the time.[6] History[edit] Katharine Cook Briggs began her research into personality in 1917. Briggs's daughter, Isabel Briggs Myers, joined her mother's typological research and progressively took it over entirely. Origins of the theory[edit] Differences from Jung[edit]

Learnng Styles take your test click here to take your learning styles test Information about learning styles and Multiple Intelligence (MI) is helpful for everyone especially for people with learning disabilities and Attention Deficit Disorder. Knowing your learning style will help you develop coping strategies to compensate for your weaknesses and capitalize on your strengths. This page provides an explanation of what learning styles and multiple intelligence are all about, an interactive assessment of your learning style/MI, and practical tips to make your learning style work for you. For ease of use, the page has been divided into six categories: Learning Styles Explained Please Pick a topic: What are learning Styles? What are the types of learning styles? Visual Learners Auditory Learners Kinesthetic Learners What are learning styles? Learning styles are simply different approaches or ways of learning. What are the types of learning styles? Visual Learners: learn through seeing... . Auditory Learners: Their Skills include:

David Reimer David Peter Reimer (August 22, 1965 – May 5, 2004) was a Canadian man who was born biologically male. However, he was sexually reassigned and raised as female after his penis was accidentally destroyed during circumcision.[1] Psychologist John Money oversaw the case and reported the reassignment as successful and as evidence that gender identity is primarily learned. Academic sexologist Milton Diamond later reported that Reimer failed to identify as female since the age of 9 to 11,[2] making the transition to living as a male at age 15. Reimer later went public with his story to discourage similar medical practices. History[edit] David Reimer was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba. They persuaded his parents that sex reassignment surgery would be in Reimer's best interest. Reimer said that Dr. Reimer had experienced the visits to Baltimore as traumatic rather than therapeutic, and when Dr. Death[edit] Social legacy[edit] For the first thirty years after Dr. In popular culture[edit] See also[edit]

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