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Illustration Island

Illustration Island

Illustration Friday Blog Pick of the Week for STUFFED and This Week’s Topic Happy Illustration Friday! Please enjoy the wonderful illustration above by Mark Brown, our Pick of the Week for last week’s topic of STUFFED. Thanks to everyone who participated with drawings, paintings, sculptures, and more. You can see a gallery of ALL the entries here. And of course, you can now participate in this week’s topic: Here’s how: Step 1: Illustrate your interpretation of the current week’s topic (always viewable on the homepage). Step 2: Post your image onto your blog / flickr / facebook, etc. Step 3: Come back to Illustration Friday and submit your illustration (see big “Submit your illustration” button on the homepage). Step 4: Your illustration will then be added to the public Gallery where it will be viewable along with everyone else’s from the IF community! Also be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter and subscribe to our weekly email newsletter to keep up with our exciting community updates! Freedom was stifling.

Film Poster Paintings from Ghana In the 1980s video cassette technology made it possible for “mobile cinema” operators in Ghana to travel from town to town and village to village creating temporary cinemas. The touring film group would create a theatre by hooking up a TV and VCR onto a portable generator and playing the films for the people to see. In order to promote these showings, artists were hired to paint large posters of the films (usually on used canvas flour sacks). The artists were given the artistic freedom to paint the posters as they desired - often adding elements that weren’t in the actual films, or without even having seen the movies. When the posters were finished they were rolled up and taken on the road (note the heavy damages). The artistic freedom that these artists were given allowed for the creation of some very interesting and sometimes bizarre posters that, as screenwriter Walter Hill wrote, were quite often “more interesting than the films.” Cujo (Lewis Teague, 1983) Deadly Prey (David A.

Resources to Help Comic Book Creators Get a Job or Career in Comics Francis Vallejo Wrong Side of Art Posters Creep Machine MOCA | The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles Gurney Journey Design Search Code Manual - Table of Contents - Introduction 1. The General Guidelines provide broad instructions and procedures for coding and interpreting the design search codes. 2. Each design search code is a numerical classification index that codifies design figurative elements into categories, divisions and sections. The design search codes act as the equivalent of a filing system for paper records. Each design element in a specific category is assigned a six-digit number. For example, a five-pointed star would be coded in category 01 (celestial bodies, natural phenomena and geographical maps), division 01 (stars, comets) and section 03 (stars with five points). The design code manual also contains explanatory notes and specific guidelines that provide instructions for specific code sections, cross-reference notes which direct users to other code categories, sections and divisions, and notes describing elements that are included or excluded from a code section. 3. Next Page - GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR CODING DESIGN MARKS

Muddy Colors @ at MoMA Ray Tomlinson. @. 1971. Here displayed in ITC American Typewriter Medium, the closest approximation to the character used by a Model 33 Teletype in the early 1970s MoMA’s Department of Architecture and Design has acquired the @ symbol into its collection. It is a momentous, elating acquisition that makes us all proud. But what does it mean, both in conceptual and in practical terms? Contemporary art, architecture, and design can take on unexpected manifestations, from digital codes to Internet addresses and sets of instructions that can be transmitted only by the artist. The acquisition of @ takes one more step. In order to understand why we have chosen to acquire the @ symbol, and how it will exist in our collection, it is necessary to understand where @ comes from, and why it’s become so ubiquitous in our world. A Little History The @ symbol used in a 1536 letter from an Italian merchant Arroba sign in document from the 1400s denoting a wheat shipment from Castile Ray Tomlinson’s @

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