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Processors That Work Like Brains Will Accelerate Artificial Intelligence

Processors That Work Like Brains Will Accelerate Artificial Intelligence
Picture a person reading these words on a laptop in a coffee shop. The machine made of metal, plastic, and silicon consumes about 50 watts of power as it translates bits of information—a long string of 1s and 0s—into a pattern of dots on a screen. Meanwhile, inside that person’s skull, a gooey clump of proteins, salt, and water uses a fraction of that power not only to recognize those patterns as letters, words, and sentences but to recognize the song playing on the radio. Computers are incredibly inefficient at lots of tasks that are easy for even the simplest brains, such as recognizing images and navigating in unfamiliar spaces. A new breed of computer chips that operate more like the brain may be about to narrow the gulf between artificial and natural computation—between circuits that crunch through logical operations at blistering speed and a mechanism honed by evolution to process and act on sensory input from the real world. Neurons Inside Learning Machines Alien Intelligence Related:  Artificial IntelligencemydyzComputers

Marvin Minsky Reflects on a Life in AI Cryptography Breakthrough Could Make Software Unhackable - Wired Science As a graduate student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1996, Amit Sahai was fascinated by the strange notion of a “zero-knowledge” proof, a type of mathematical protocol for convincing someone that something is true without revealing any details of why it is true. As Sahai mulled over this counterintuitive concept, it led him to consider an even more daring notion: What if it were possible to mask the inner workings not just of a proof, but of a computer program, so that people could use the program without being able to figure out how it worked? The idea of “obfuscating” a program had been around for decades, but no one had ever developed a rigorous mathematical framework for the concept, let alone created an unassailable obfuscation scheme. Over the years, commercial software companies have engineered various techniques for garbling a computer program so that it will be harder to understand while still performing the same function. Too Powerful to Exist

The Julia Language Sed - An Introduction and Tutorial Your browser does not have Javascript enabled. I use Javascript for analytics, and to show ads which pay for the maintenance Last modified: Thu Apr 23 16:37:48 EDT 2015 Quick Links Table of Contents Note - You can click on the table of contents sections to jump to that section. Then click on the section header of any section to jump back to the table of contents. Copyright 1994, 1995 Bruce Barnett and General Electric Company Copyright 2001,2005,2007,2011,2013 Bruce Barnett All rights reserved You are allowed to print copies of this tutorial for your personal use, and link to this page, but you are not allowed to make electronic copies, or redistribute this tutorial in any form without permission. Original version written in 1994 and published in the Sun Observer Introduction to Sed How to use sed, a special editor for modifying files automatically. There are a few programs that are the real workhorse in the UNIX toolbox. The Awful Truth about sed Sed is the ultimate stream editor. Do not fret! or .

Judit Polgár As of February 2014[update], Polgár was ranked 58th in the world FIDE ratings list with an Elo rating of 2693, the only[update] woman on FIDE's Top 100 Players list, and has been ranked as high as eighth (in 2005). She has won or shared first in the chess tournaments of Hastings 1993, Madrid 1994, León 1996, U.S. Open 1998, Hoogeveen 1999, Siegman 1999, Japfa 2000, and the Najdorf Memorial 2000.[2] Polgár is the only woman to have won a game from a reigning world number one player, and has defeated ten current or former world champions in either rapid or classical chess: Magnus Carlsen, Anatoli Karpov, Garry Kasparov, Boris Spassky, Vasily Smyslov, Veselin Topalov, Viswanathan Anand, Ruslan Ponomariov, Alexander Khalifman, and Rustam Kasimdzhanov.[3] Early life[edit] Career[edit] Polgár has rarely played in women's-specific tournaments or divisions and has never competed for the Women's World Championship. Child prodigy[edit] J. 1.Rxh7 Rxh7 2.Qxg6+ Kh8 3.Qe8+ with mate to follow.

How close are we to creating artificial intelligence... It is uncontroversial that the human brain has capabilities that are, in some respects, far superior to those of all other known objects in the cosmos. It is the only kind of object capable of understanding that the cosmos is even there, or why there are infinitely many prime numbers, or that apples fall because of the curvature of space-time, or that obeying its own inborn instincts can be morally wrong, or that it itself exists. Nor are its unique abilities confined to such cerebral matters. But no brain on Earth is yet close to knowing what brains do in order to achieve any of that functionality. Why? Despite this long record of failure, AGI must be possible. Babbage came upon universality from an unpromising direction. Unfortunately, Babbage’s project-management skills were so poor that despite spending vast amounts of his own and the British government’s money, he never managed to get the machine built. Here was a cognitive task that only humans had been able to perform. Why?

NSA Snooping Was Only the Beginning. Meet the Spy Chief Leading Us Into Cyberwar | Threat Level Alexander runs the nation’s cyberwar efforts, an empire he has built over the past eight years by insisting that the US’s inherent vulnerability to digital attacks requires him to amass more and more authority over the data zipping around the globe. In his telling, the threat is so mind-bogglingly huge that the nation has little option but to eventually put the entire civilian Internet under his protection, requiring tweets and emails to pass through his filters, and putting the kill switch under the government’s forefinger. “What we see is an increasing level of activity on the networks,” he said at a recent security conference in Canada. “I am concerned that this is going to break a threshold where the private sector can no longer handle it and the government is going to have to step in.” And he and his cyberwarriors have already launched their first attack. The success of this sabotage came to light only in June 2010, when the malware spread to outside computers.

Paul Ford: What is Code? | Bloomberg A computer is a clock with benefits. They all work the same, doing second-grade math, one step at a time: Tick, take a number and put it in box one. Tick, take another number, put it in box two. Tick, operate (an operation might be addition or subtraction) on those two numbers and put the resulting number in box one. You, using a pen and paper, can do anything a computer can; you just can’t do those things billions of times per second. Apple has always made computers; Microsoft used to make only software (and occasional accessory hardware, such as mice and keyboards), but now it’s in the hardware business, with Xbox game consoles, Surface tablets, and Lumia phones. So many things are computers, or will be. When you “batch” process a thousand images in Photoshop or sum numbers in Excel, you’re programming, at least a little. You can make computers do wonderful things, but you need to understand their limits. 2.1 How Do You Type an “A”? It’s simple now, right? Ballmer chants “Developers!”

Constructivist Model for Learning The behaviorist theory popularized by B.F. Skinner still drives much of the practice of science education. For more than a quarter century, schools and teachers have been creating behavioral goals and objectives. Curricula have been tightly sequenced according to a belief that the best way to learn is to master small bits of knowledge and then integrate them into major concepts. Assessment practices have tended to focus on measurement of knowledge and skills, with little emphasis on performance and understanding. Since the late 1980s, however, researchers have been building an understanding of learning that grows out of cognitive and developmental psychology. All knowledge is constructed through a process of reflective abstraction. The constructivist classroom presents the learner with opportunities to build on prior knowledge and understanding to construct new knowledge and understanding from authentic experience.

Beyond Zero and One: Machines, Psychedelics, and Consciousness by Andrew Smart review – inside the minds of computers Do androids dream of electric Kool-Aid acid tests? If there’s to be any hope for us, they will. That is the message of Andrew Smart’s splendidly mind-bending book, which mashes up Alan Turing, The Matrix, Immanuel Kant, “zombie AI”, Leibniz, and research on psychedelic drugs. In our age of techno-utopianism, we are routinely told in crypto-religious terms about the coming “Singularity” – the creation of superintelligent, conscious machines. One problem with superintelligent conscious machines, however – as SF writers down the ages and some modern philosophers agree – is that they might very well choose to destroy all humans. That might sound like far-out hippy futurism, but much of this book is devoted to unravelling the woolly thinking of machine intelligence enthusiasts themselves. Let’s take these in turn. What about the idea that our brains do computations? Surely, though, we can at least say that computations are happening inside computers?

Wireless Witch: How to Secure Your Wireless Network One of the biggest concerns for wireless users is making sure their router and wireless network are secure. I think we all know by now that, when it comes to technology, there is no such thing as being 100 percent secure. Once you send data over a wireless signal, you've already potentially exposed your data to hackers, and once you've set up a router, Wi-Fi signal leeches are always a possibility. That said, there are plenty of ways to harden the security of your router and wireless network. Most of them are fairly easy to put in place, while some take just a bit of configuration in the router's interface. I've included several options each with an accompanying image to get you going towards a more secure Wi-Fi network. The routers I use as examples are the Cisco Linksys Smart Wi-Fi AC 1750HD Video Pro EA6500$149.99 at Dell and the Netgear N600 Wireless Dual Band Gigabit Router (WNDR3700)%displayPrice% at %seller%—with Netgear's new Genie management software.

How a Kalman filter works, in pictures | Bzarg I have to tell you about the Kalman filter, because what it does is pretty damn amazing. Surprisingly few software engineers and scientists seem to know about it, and that makes me sad because it is such a general and powerful tool for combining information in the presence of uncertainty. At times its ability to extract accurate information seems almost magical— and if it sounds like I’m talking this up too much, then take a look at this previously posted video where I demonstrate a Kalman filter figuring out the orientation of a free-floating body by looking at its velocity. Totally neat! You can use a Kalman filter in any place where you have uncertain information about some dynamic system, and you can make an educated guess about what the system is going to do next. Kalman filters are ideal for systems which are continuously changing. The math for implementing the Kalman filter appears pretty scary and opaque in most places you find on Google. \(\vec{x_k} = (\vec{p}, \vec{v})\) Hmm.

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