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Programming Your Brain: The Art of Learning in Three Steps

Programming Your Brain: The Art of Learning in Three Steps
From time to time, I run into people who are interested in breaking into programming. Last night at the company holiday party a guy (we’ll call him Sam) walked up and introduced himself, asking for advice on how to move from his current role over to development. Sam’s attitude impressed me – those with a genuine desire to learn go places quickly. And on many occasions I’ve hired someone very green simply because I could sense a genuine interest in the craft and a hunger for knowledge. I’ll take attitude over aptitude. Obviously, the road to becoming a better developer begins with learning. Watch someone Thus, I personally watch videos or read books and blogs. Now, be forewarned that according to National Training Laboratories, the percentages on this diagram have no known source behind them, so take my references to the absolute percentages with a grain of salt. Watch someoneTry it yourself and experiment But that’s not the end of the road. Presto. Does this ring true for you? Related:  Train the Trainer

Reducing Bullet Points and On-screen Text Reducing Bullets Points and On-screen Text One of the most common questions e-learning designers ask is around how to reduce the amount of bullets in their courses. And it's a great question, because when used appropriately, bullet points offer an effective way to organize content and increase readability. So, why are bullet points so misused? One reason is they're easy, right? Here are a few ways to reduce bullet points: Rewrite as a question and allow the narration to answer the questionShorten bullet points from full sentences to a phrase or even a wordUse one bullet point per slideUse an image, graphic, chart or animation in place of each bullet The following screencasts demonstrate some before and after examples. And Part 2: Here's an example of the storyboard used for this course Post written by David Anderson

Learning Techniques One of the things that we expect you to pick up by osmosis, but almost never mention explicitly, is techniques for learning itself. After you leave university, you will be expected to be able to learn by yourself for the rest of your life. And an hour spent addressing the meta-issue of learning skills pays off in reduced time to actually learn. A lot of work has been done over the past few decades about how people learn. This document suggests a wide range of techniques that may make your learning more effective. You may want to experiment with some of them to see if they work for you. I recommend the work on accelerated learning by Colin Rose and Brian Tracy. You can learn anything if you have a goal that requires it. There are a number of stages to learning, each of which involves a number of aspects. The right state of mind There are six aspects to being in the right state of mind to learn. Here are the six aspects: Find a personal reason to want to learn this material. Memorising

5 Ways to Blow the Top Off of Rubrics This is a guest post from Shawn McCusker of EdTechTeacher.org which is an advertiser on this blog. Do you have a rubric for that? Rubrics, designed to help teachers grade fairly and convey their learning objectives and performance standards to students, can serve a critical role especially with technology-rich projects. Teachers also like them for standardizing grading among teachers teaching the same course. "If you assign a project and get back 30 of the exact same thing, that's not a project, that's a recipe." - Chris Lehmann Especially with 1:1 or BYOD classrooms, where individualized learning should be the norm, this is a huge potential problem. “Individualized instruction is a method of instruction in which content, instructional technology (such as materials) and pace of learning are based upon the abilities and interests of each individual learner” via Wikipedia “It is the supreme art of the teacher to awaken joy in the creative art of expression and knowledge.”

chris argyris, double-loop learning and organizational learning @ the encyclopedia of informal education contents: introduction · life · theories of action: theory in use and espoused theory · single-loop and double-loop learning · model I and model II · organizational learning · conclusion · further reading and references · links · cite Chris Argyris has made a significant contribution to the development of our appreciation of organizational learning, and, almost in passing, deepened our understanding of experiential learning. On this page we examine the significance of the models he developed with Donald Schön of single-loop and double-loop learning, and how these translate into contrasting models of organizational learning systems. Life Chris Argyris was born in Newark, New Jersey on July 16, 1923 and grew up in Irvington, New Jersey. Chris Argyris enjoyed the outdoors – and, in particular hiking (especially in the mountains of New Hampshire and across New England). As well as writing and researching, Chris Argyris has been an influential teacher. Single-loop and double-loop learning

Tools for Teachers learning theory - models, product and process Photo by Antenna on Unsplash Contents: introduction · what do people think learning is? · learning as a product · learning as a process · experience · reflective thinking · making connections · committing and acting · task-conscious or acquisition learning, and learning-conscious or formalized learning · the behaviourist orientation to learning · the cognitive orientation to learning · the humanistic orientation to learning · the social/situational orientation to learning · the constructivist/social constructivist orientation to learning · further reading · references · how to cite this article See, also, What is education? Over the last thirty years or so, ‘learning’ has become one of the most used words in the field of education. Adult education became lifelong learning; students became learners, teachers facilitators of learning; schools are now learning environments; learning outcomes are carefully monitored. There has been a similar situation in the field of education. Taxonomies

My Reflective Teaching Blog Mobile Learning: 50+ Resources & Tips I believe mobile devices will transform education. This is why I created a free ebook, Effective Mobile Learning: 50+ Quick Tips & Resources with helpful tips and several resources to help support this trend. One reason is because mobile devices are designed in a way that forces the teacher to give control to the learner. When we equip a classroom with iPads, iPods, small tablets, or cellphones the learning is literally put in the hands of the students. The teacher has to facilitate and walk around the room to manage the learning. Below are a list of 50+ Mobile Learning resources & growing! Mobile Learning Free Ebooks Mobile Learning Posts/Presentations I’ve Given Mobile Learning LiveBinder of Resources Mobile Learning Mindmap of Implementation This mindmap is full of case studies, schools, teachers, free ebooks, and more to show real examples of mobile learning at its best.

Every Educator Has a Story . . . Just Tell It. This is one of my favorite cartoons ever. The “punch” line is that every person on the planet has a story to tell. I also know that every teacher story to tell. Educators are doing amazing things with their learners in spite (i.e., to show spite toward) of the standards-based and accountability-driven movements. This is my own call to action for educators to tell their stories of those rich and amazing things they are doing in their classrooms. Write a blog.Tweet about it.Make photo essays and upload to a photo sharing site like Flickr.Take some video footage and share it on YouTube, TeacherTube, or Vimeo.Ask learner to blog about it.Share on Facebook.Give virtual presentations at conferences such as Global Education and K12 Online.Ask local reporters to come to your classroomOthers? For example, I am incorporating students’ mobile devices into an undergraduate course on Interpersonal Relationships. I now have a record/reflection about the class. Like this: Like Loading...

QR Codes – What are they and how can I use them in my classroom? A QR Code is a type of barcode that is readable by dedicated QR barcode readers and camera telephones. The code consists of black modules arranged in a square pattern on a white background. The information encoded may be text, URL, or other data*. Like me, you may have seen these codes in newspapers and magazines, on promotional material, in the corner of posters and wondered what they were all about. First, watch this short, fun video from a primary class in Queensland to get an idea of how QR Codes are being used in the classroom, and then keep reading. QR Codes can provide an alternative access format for students who need additional support in reading and writing. The way QR Codes can be used in the classroom is only limited by our own and our students’ imagination. More ideas? QR Codes in the Cla Teaching with QR MacBook QRGen iPad

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