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The 3 C’s of Information Commerce: Consumption, Curation, Creation

inShare180 Over the years, social networks have lured us from the confines of our existing realities into a new genre of digital domains that not only captivated us, but fostered the creation of new realities. As George Bernard Shaw observed, “Life is not about finding yourself, life is about creating yourself.” Such is true for social networks and the digital persona and resulting experiences we create and cultivate. It was the beginning of the shift in behavior toward an era of digital extroversion, self-defined by varying degrees of sharing, connections, and engagement. On Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, et al., we were attracted by the promise of reigniting forgotten relationships and enamored by the sparking of new connections. With each new connection we wove, we were compelled to share details about ourselves that we might not have divulged in real life. Our concerns of privacy or the lack thereof, now require education. The Social Genome The 3C’s, Consumption, Creation, and Curation

http://www.briansolis.com/2010/11/the-three-cs-of-social-networking-consumption-curation-creation/

Related:  Content Curation

Curated Content Delivery Formats: Beyond News Portals and Magazines The new frontiers for content curation tools and services are in a) providing advanced collaborative ("social)" features and in b) introducing and integrating new and effective, highly visual, delivery formats. Photo credit: CaraMaria Curating content and news is not just about the selection, editing and contextualization of stories about a specific topic or theme, but it is increasingly about how these information items are (collaboratively) gathered, organized, grouped, displayed and in which ways they can be accessed and browsed by those interested in them. For me, one of the most fascinating aspects of this exploding content curation trend, is the speculative exploration of how "curated" content collections could best benefit from alternative and more effective delivery formats than the classic linear, top-to-bottom, chronological, river-of-news sequence.

Why We Need It The time it takes to follow and go through multiple web sites and blogs takes tangible time, and since most sources publish or give coverage to more than one topic, one gets to browse and scan through lots of useless content just for the sake of finding what is relevant to his specific interest. Even in the case of power-users utilizing RSS feed readers, aggregators and filters, the amount of junk we have to sift through daily is nothing but impressive, so much so, that those who have enough time and skills to pick the gems from that ocean of tweets, social media posts and blog posts, enjoy a fast increasing reputation and visibility online. Photo credit: dsharpie and franckreporter mashed up by Robin Good "What we need to get much better at is scaling that system so you don't have to pay attention to everything, but you don't miss the stuff you care about..."Ev Williams at a Girls in Tech event at Kicklabsvia Stowe Boyd's blog

Are you a content consumer or creator? Brian Solis inShare835 You’ll soon learn why I’m posting shorter, but more frequent posts…In the mean time, I wanted to share with you something I’ve been thinking quite a bit about these days. Think about the generation or two before us. A significant portion of free time was spent consuming media. Content Curation Vs Content Aggregation Two posts brought to my attention the discussion starting to take root about the worlds of content aggregation versus content curation. A post on the Poynter blog back in early October points to the work of journalists engaging in curation via Twitter as a way of “filtering the signal from the noise.” The phrase used was “curation is the new aggregation.” A more recent post on the Simple-talk.com blog by Roger Hart delves more into the world of content curation in a broader sense, stating that it is a bit of a flavor-of-the-month.

Social curation is much more than just a market In 2010, “curation” popped up on tech blogs and VCs’ radars. Since then, people have been asking whether curation is a legitimate trend, a new market to be exploited, or just the latest buzzword. Some people, including GigaOM writer Bobbie Johnson, have wondered if curation is a bubble, and if it is, when is it going to burst? When Johnson asked this question, I think the jury was still out. As the chief evangelist for the social library Pearltrees, I was directly involved in the “Web curation” movement early on, and I think it is now clear that social curation is not a bubble. Content Curation is Here to stay In a labyrinth of content, consumers have always looked to opinion leaders who could edit content for them and direct them towards relevant information. Oprah‘s book club moved masses of people towards her recommended list of books and authors. The web is facing the very same crisis today.

The Curation Economy and The 3C’s of Information Commerce Brian Solis inShare1 Several years ago I had the privilege of working with Steve Rosenbaum, author of Curation Nation. Back then Steve was already vested in the future of online curation and his grande conquête was playing out with Magnify.net, a realtime video curation network. At the time, he was also a staple at some of the tech industry’s most renown conferences sharing his vision for social, video, and curated content.

Curation Is Not Cheap Content... Posted by Tom Foremski - May 16, 2011 There seems to be quite a few people in marketing that look upon "curation" as an inexpensive and quick way to get content onto a site. After all, how hard can it be to collect a few links and publish them? However, "cheap" content doesn't mean it's good content. Is Your Content Curation Ethical? A 10-Step Checklist Curation itself is nothing new — museums have used art curators for centuries — but online content curation is still in its early stages. The early years of the internet were like the “Wild West,” and because it was so new, there were few ethical or legal guidelines to police behavior. With new legislation governing online copyright and commerce, that’s all changed.

Manifesto For The Content Curator: The Next Big Social Media Job Of The Future ? Every hour thousands of new videos are uploaded online. Blog posts are written and published. Millions of tweets and other short messages are shared. Remix culture Read-Only Culture vs. Read/Write Culture[edit] The Read Only culture (RO) is the culture we consume more or less passively. The information or product is provided to us by a 'professional' source, the content industry, that possesses an authority on that particular product/information.

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