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14 Free Apps for Higher Order Thinking

14 Free Apps for Higher Order Thinking
Apps for higher order thinking can be a great push for your students to explain their thinking and create their own digital portfolio items. Apps that focus on higher order thinking can help your students start using focused thought processes to address new questions, investigations, and basic HOTS skills. Each of these apps can be used to complement and execute Bloom’s Higher Order of Thinking framework, focusing on analyzing, evaluating, and creating. With these high order thinking apps, you can focus your students on: raising questions vital to discussiongathering and assessing information systematicallytesting conclusions against criteriathinking with an open mind about alternative theories and solutionscommunicating complex ideas effectively Please enable JavaScript to view the <a href=" onclick="__gaTracker('send', 'event', 'outbound-article', ' 'discussion by Sidelines.') Share this post with friends and colleagues:

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24 iPad Apps to Support Bloom’s Taxonomy via eSchool News Bloom’s Taxonomy, introduced in the 1950s as a system of organizing learning objectives into a pyramid, traditionally has started with creating at the top, followed by evaluating, analyzing, applying, understanding, and remembering. Some educators today are flipping the triangle so that remembering is on top, followed by understanding, applying, analyzing, evaluating, and creating on the bottom. During an edWeb.net webinar, educational technologist Kathy Schrock presented a variety of apps for iPads that can boost student engagement and collaboration, and that can be used for teaching and learning according to Bloom’s Taxonomy. “Remembering” apps:Diigo – A social bookmarking tool; teachers can use this app on an iPad to add relevant bookmarks, or create their own account and share. Lists can be organized into sub lists.Evernote – A “must-have” app.

Formative assessment strategies for success During a recent eSchool News webinar, experts revealed how formative assessment can support the curriculum A key takeaway was that formative assessment is a process, and not a “one moment in time” event. How can formative assessment be used to support the curriculum? This was the subject of a recent webinar sponsored by SunGard K-12 Education, during which two experts revealed their strategies for success. The panelists were John Phillipo, founder and executive director of the Center for Educational Leadership and Technology, and Bethany Silver, director of assessment, evaluation, and research for the Bloomfield, Conn., schools. Moderating the discussion was Joel Hames, director of product management for SunGard.

Preparing Teachers for Deeper Learning - Getting Smart by Getting Smart Staff - Assessment, CCSS, Competency-based learning, deeper learning, education, learning, teachers Today Digital Promise and Getting Smart released “Preparing Teachers for Deeper Learning: Competency-Based Teacher Preparation and Development.” This white paper outlines the attributes of next-generation teacher preparation and makes recommendations to support the development of teacher preparation and development systems. Co-authored by Getting Smart’s Tom Vander Ark and Dr. Carri Schneider with Karen Cator, President and CEO of Digital Promise, the paper outlines how the role of teachers is changing amid broader shifts to personalized, blended, and deeper learning.

Best EdTech Apps of 2014 2014 was a terrific year for learning apps. As more schools put tablets in kids' hands, edtech developers are rising to the challenge. Of the hundreds of apps reviewed on Common Sense Graphite this year, these 10 stood out as some of the most innovative, effective, and enjoyable apps I've seen. They span grades and content areas, and include creation tools for both teachers and students. Cookie Monster's Challenge (iPad) Formative assessment with hexagons Formative assessment is something I’ve been putting a lot more emphasis on over the past few years. I’m so sick of just relying of end-of-topic exams to gauge what students have learnt. I want my students to continuously question how they are going and make changes to their learning accordingly. This is one of the reasons that my faculty has embarked on a Structured Observed Learning Outcomes (SOLO) journey this year. One of the ways that many teachers using SOLO use to assess student learning is with SOLO hexagons.

Study Habits: New App Helps Students Get Organized and Motivated After testing the app for a month with two classes of students, I can endorse Study Habits as the best student productivity app for iOS and Android. Compared to its competitors, Study Habits provides the richest array of features and augments its planning capabilities with proven study aids. The app enables students to manage their time, monitor their GPAs, and adopt effective study habits. Thanks to its educational-psychology-based learning and motivation strategies, Study Habits is unparalleled in the productivity app market. Read on to find out what Study Habits can do and why no other student planning app compares. 24 Questions to Enhance Students Reflective and Critical Thinking Skills August 31, 2014 Reflection is a fundamental skill from which is branched out all other thinking skills. Reflection is a form of meta-thinking, a process of deep contemplation and pondering. It is also the basis of critical thinking for we can not raise critical thinkers if we do not have good 'reflectors'. When students are taught the art of reflecting, they become independent learners who are engaged in a constant process of assessment and re-assessment of their learning needs and strategies. Reflection is all about questioning. To cultivate a reflective culture within your class, students need to be encouraged to pose challenging questions as to the way they learn and think.

Kill The Report Card Created by Reid Wilson via someecards.com Report cards drive my teaching. There, I said it. I know it’s the last thing we are supposed to say, because we strive so hard in international schools not to teach to the test. But, the truth is, it’s the elephant in the room that nobody wants to talk about for fear of being judged. Five iPad Apps That Help Students Learn Programming Basics Even if your students are never going to become professional app developers, learning the fundamentals of programming can be helpful in understanding how software works. Learning programming basics also helps students develop a better understanding of “if, then” logic which can be applied to a wide variety of academic areas. Here are five iPad apps that can help students learn some programming basics. The Tynker iPad app features stories that students animate by completing a series of programming challenges. The programming happens by organizing a series of blocks that represent commands. In that way it is similar to apps like Daisy the Dinosaur and MIT’s App Inventor.

Excellent Tool to Create Rubrics for Your Class November, 2014 Rubistar is a great free web tool that teachers can use to create educational rubrics to use in class. By definition, a rubric according to Geidi Andrade, is "a document that articulates the expectations for an assignment by listening the criteria, or what counts, and describing levels of quality from excellent to poor". As a teacher you can create rubrics and use them for a variety of purposes. These include: grading students assignments, providing focused feedback on works in progress, preparing lesson plans and many more. " Rubrics can teach as well as evaluate. When used as part of a formative, student centered approach to assessment, rubrics have the potential to help students develop understanding and skill, as well as make dependable judgments about the quality of their own work. Rubistar is very simple and easy to use.

Teacher Recommended: 50 Favorite Classroom Apps Educators and students are quickly becoming more comfortable with classroom technology, allowing them to shift from thinking about the technical side of integrating a new tool to focusing on how it improves learning. While the sheer number of education apps is still overwhelming, increasingly teachers have found what works for them and are sticking to them. “The conversations I had were radically different than they were a year ago,” said Michelle Luhtala, the librarian for New Canaan High School and host of an Emerging Tech webinar on edWeb. She tapped her professional learning network of educators, teaching all grades and located all over the country, to share their favorite tech tools. Asking Questions to Improve Learning When you prepare for class, office hours, and help sessions, compose specific questions that you will ask your students (or that you anticipate they will ask you). Doing so will help you increase student participation and encourage active learning. The strategies below will also help you formulate questions for exams and paper assignments. Active learning extends beyond the classroom. When you ask questions in the classroom, you are modeling a process that students can and should use themselves; encourage your students to use the following questioning strategies to assess what they have learned, to develop their thinking skills, and to study for exams. General Strategies for Asking Questions

Making The Best App Choices With @Graphite When I was beginning to roll out a Bring Your Own Device initiative in my previous district we spent a great deal of time sitting and talking with teachers. There are many misconceptions and questions that arise when we allow students to use their own technology in the classroom, so I wanted to make sure we addressed those right away so we could focus on the learning and not the classroom management. 10 times out of 10 the question came up, how could they find new and exciting tools, apps and sites to use with their students but still ensure they were effective and meeting their curriculum goals?

Top 5 iPad apps for Educators — Edgalaxy: Cool Stuff for Nerdy teachers It would be remiss of me not to put together an obligatory iPad story that is loosely linked to education so here are some top iPad apps for educators who feel as though they need to do something work related on it after they have finished playing with all the fun stuff on it iWork Until Microsoft release office for the iPad iWork offers the MS Works equivalent of a productivity suite for the iPad. Pages, Numbers and Keynote make for a fairly impressive productivity suite for $30, or $10 each. The Elements: A Visual Exploration: Sounds a bit pricey for a periodic table, but the vividly animated illustrations of every substance our world is made of more than make up for it. $14 Bento: Organize your Life Mobile Air Mouse: Do you use an Interactive whiteboard and have wireless keyboards and mice floating around the place that either don’t work or you have to actually sit in front of a computer to type something on your IWB.

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