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2KW DIY Solar panels made of pop cans for home solar heating

2KW DIY Solar panels made of pop cans for home solar heating
At the end, the solar absorber is painted black and placed in the diy solar panels casing. The casing is covered with plexiglass that we attach to the frame and thoroughly corked with silicone. Polycarbonate / plexiglass is slightly convex in order to gain greater strength. You can see installed solar absorber without plexiglass in picture 18. Complete solar collector is shown on Picture 19, and finally, installed solar system can be seen in Picture 20. The following page shows complete specification of parts and material needed for building diy solar panels. On YouTube you can see how our diy pop-can solar panels work. Important note: Our solar system is not able to accumulate thermal energy after producing it. Differential thermostat (snap disc) controls the fan. If on/off temperatures are set carefully, diy solar panels are able to produce an average 2 kW of energy for home heating.

http://www.freeonplate.com/how-to-build-diy-solar-panels-out-of-pop-cans/

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