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5 Ways to Make Class Discussions More Exciting

5 Ways to Make Class Discussions More Exciting
Classroom discussions have been a staple of teaching forever, beginning with Socrates. I have taught using discussions, been a student in discussions, and observed other teachers' discussions thousands of times -- at least. Some have been boring, stifling or tedious enough to put me to sleep. Others have been so stimulating that I was sad to see them end. The difference between the two is obviously how interesting the topic is, but equally important is the level of student participation. It's not enough for students to simply pay attention -- they need to be active participants to generate one of those great discussions that end far too quickly for both the teacher and students. The best discussions keep everyone active, either by sharing or thinking. 1. Just the name "lightning round" suggests energy. 2. When you ask a discussion question, call on students by letting them catch a ball. 3. 4. Keep each question going longer by engaging more students in the discussion. 5.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/make-class-discussions-more-exciting-richard-curwin

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Nine Ways to Improve Class Discussions I once heard class discussions described as “transient instructional events.” They pass through the class, the course, and the educational experiences of students with few lingering effects. Ideas are batted around, often with forced participation; students don’t take notes; and then the discussion ends—it runs out of steam or the class runs out of time. If asked a few days later about the exchange, most students would be hard-pressed to remember anything beyond what they themselves might have said, if that. So this post offers some simple suggestions for increasing the impact of the discussions that occur in our courses. 1.

Conversation Questions for the ESL/EFL Classroom If this is your first time here, then read the Teacher's Guide to Using These PagesIf you can think of a good question for any list, please send it to us. Home | Articles | Lessons | Techniques | Questions | Games | Jokes | Things for Teachers | Links | Activities for ESL Students Would you like to help? If you can think of a good question for any list, please send it to us. If you would like to suggest another topic, please send it and a set of questions to begin the topic. Understanding by Design Part 2: Designing the Essential Questions - Learning Bird Value and benefits of questions Since Socrates, asking questions has been a hallmark of the teaching profession. Whether used to guide students through a lecture or to check for understanding on exams, questions are the primary mode of encouraging information transfer from instructor to student and from topic to topic. According to Leven and Long in 1912, teachers spent nearly 80% of the day asking questions; this result has been repeated multiple times since, with similar results. Questions allow us to structure our classrooms, to organize the flow of information in courses, and to probe students for deeper understanding.

Wooden Spoon Speculations Copyright © 2014 Emma Gore-Lloyd I found this game on a party games website sometime a couple of years ago. It’s a guessing game that works well in a class of students who are fairly comfortable with each other and have a good sense of humour. Students can use it to practise speculative language. Equipment needed: 2 wooden spoons; one scarf/blindfold First, elicit speculative language from the students, eg.

Teaching with Technology Collaboratory - Improving the Use of Discussion Boards Considerable research indicates that the effective use of discussion boards results in... Collison, G., Elbaum, B., Haavind, S., & Tinker, R. (2000). Facilitating online learning: Effective strategies for moderators. Atwood Publishing: Madison, WI. Picture Description Lesson Plan This is a fun lesson plan in which students work in pairs describing and drawing pictures. It will be useful for students preparing for Cambridge exam speaking activities. You will need this handout: Pics for describing Talking Across Divides: 10 Ways to Encourage Civil Classroom Conversation On Difficult Issues During the week of Oct. 3 to 7, we are posting a new Student Opinion question each day about five issues that are dividing Americans this election year. Those posts will remain open to comment until Election Day, and we invite teenagers from anywhere in the world to share their thoughts and reply to the thoughts of others. The challenge?

Tell a story or personal anecdote Examiner: OK, Kelvin, so I’d like you to tell us a short personal story. Here are the topics. Please take one. 7 Strategies To Help Students Ask Great Questions - TeachThought PD Bring TeachThought Professional Development To Your School! 7 Strategies To Help Students Ask Great Questions by Terry Heick Questions can be extraordinary learning tools. A good question can open minds, shift paradigms, and force the uncomfortable but transformational cognitive dissonance that can help create thinkers. In education, we tend to value a student’s ability to answer our questions.

Using a "Three-Two-one" Speaking Activity Using a "Three-Two-One" Speaking Activity English-language teacher trainer and author Paul Nation has developed the “4-3-2″ Fluency Activity. In it, students line up (standing or sitting) facing each other. Each one must be prepared to speak on something that they are already quite familiar with. First, they speak to their partner for four minutes about the topic.

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