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The Silmarillion

The Silmarillion
The Silmarillion /sɪlməˈrɪlɨən/ is a collection of J. R. R. Tolkien's mythopoeic works, edited and published posthumously by his son, Christopher Tolkien, in 1977, with assistance from Guy Gavriel Kay,[1] who later became a noted fantasy writer. The Silmarillion, along with J. R. After the success of The Hobbit, and prior to the publication of The Lord of the Rings, Tolkien's publisher requested a sequel to The Hobbit, and Tolkien sent them an early draft of The Silmarillion. The five parts were initially separate works, but it was the elder Tolkien's express wish that they be published together.[1] Because J. Overview[edit] The Silmarillion, like Tolkien's other Middle-earth writings, was meant to have taken place at some time in Earth's past.[4] In keeping with this idea, The Silmarillion is meant to have been translated from Bilbo's three-volume Translations from the Elvish, which he wrote while at Rivendell.[5] Among the notable chapters in the book are: Synopsis[edit] Akallabêth[edit]

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Durin's folk In the Third Age, after being driven out of Moria by the Balrog Durin's Bane, most of Durin's Folk fled north and established cities in Erebor and the Ered Mithrin. Both the Ered Mithrin and Erebor were later occupied by Dragons, and they then became a wandering folk in exile. Most of them settled in the Iron Hills, while others under Thráin II wandered west, till they came to the Ered Luin and settled there. Finally, the Dwarven Kingdom of Erebor was restored when Dáin II, Lord of the Iron Hills, became King of Erebor in T.A. 2941 after Smaug's death.

The Hobbit The Hobbit is a novel by J.R.R. Tolkien, set in Middle-earth. The book was first published on September 21, 1937 and is set in the years 2941 to 2942 of the Third Age before the events of The Lord of the Rings.[1] The Book J. R. R. Tolkien John Ronald Reuel Tolkien, CBE (/ˈtɒlkiːn/ TOL-keen;[a] 3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English writer, poet, philologist, and university professor, best known as the author of the classic high fantasy works The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion. He served as the Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon and Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford, from 1925 to 1945 and Merton Professor of English Language and Literature and Fellow of Merton College, Oxford from 1945 to 1959.[1] He was at one time a close friend of C. S. Lewis—they were both members of the informal literary discussion group known as the Inklings. Tolkien was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth II on 28 March 1972. In 2008, The Times ranked him sixth on a list of "The 50 greatest British writers since 1945".[7] Forbes ranked him the 5th top-earning "dead celebrity" in 2009.[8]

Cyberspace (role-playing game) Cyberspace is a cyberpunk role-playing game published by Iron Crown Enterprises and using a somewhat modified version of their Spacemaster ruleset. The primary setting of Cyberspace is the urban sprawl around San Francisco in the year 2090. The game was out of print and unavailable for a number of years around the turn of the millennium, but is now available, with all of its supplements, from the publisher's homepage in a PDF format. Character classes for Cyberspace include:

The Encyclopedia of Arda The Encyclopedia of Arda is a personal project - a tribute to and a celebration of the works of J.R.R. Tolkien. The site is evolving into an illustrated hypertext encyclopedia of Tolkien's realms and peoples. It already contains about four thousand entries, and we're constantly adding new entries and expanding existing ones.

Thorin Oakenshield Characteristics[edit] Thorin is described as haughty, stern and officious. He has a talent for singing and playing the harp, wears a gold chain, and has a very long beard. He wears a distinctive sky blue hood with a long silver tassel.

The Hobbit: Themes, Motifs & Symbols Themes Themes are the fundamental and often universal ideas explored in a literary work. Bilbo’s Heroism The Hobbit’s main theme is Bilbo’s development into a hero, which more broadly represents the development of a common person into a hero. Fantasy Fairy tales and legends, such as Dobrynya Nikitich's rescue of Zabava Putyatichna from the dragon Gorynych, have been an important source for fantasy. In popular culture, the fantasy genre is predominantly of the medievalist form. In its broadest sense, however, fantasy comprises works by many writers, artists, filmmakers, and musicians, from ancient myths and legends to many recent works embraced by a wide audience today. Fantasy is studied in a number of disciplines (English, cultural studies, comparative literature, history, medieval studies). Work in this area ranges widely, from the structuralist theory of Tzvetan Todorov, which emphasizes the fantastic as a liminal space, to work on the connections (political, historical, literary) between medievalism and popular culture.[1]

Shadow World Shadow World is a high-fantasy campaign setting situated on the fictional planet of Kulthea. Originally produced for the Rolemaster role-playing game system, the game setting is owned by Iron Crown Enterprises (often referred to as I.C.E.). It is currently maintained by the primary author of the setting, Terry K. Amthor of Eidolon Studio (who also holds the trademark for Shadow World, and copyrights for non-gaming fiction related to the world).

Related:  JRR TolkienTolkien Wikipedia Pages