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The Hobbit

The Hobbit
Set in a time "Between the Dawn of Færie and the Dominion of Men",[1] The Hobbit follows the quest of home-loving hobbit Bilbo Baggins to win a share of the treasure guarded by the dragon, Smaug. Bilbo's journey takes him from light-hearted, rural surroundings into more sinister territory.[2] The story is told in the form of an episodic quest, and most chapters introduce a specific creature, or type of creature, of Tolkien's Wilderland. By accepting the disreputable, romantic, fey and adventurous side of his nature and applying his wits and common sense, Bilbo gains a new level of maturity, competence and wisdom.[3] The story reaches its climax in the Battle of Five Armies, where many of the characters and creatures from earlier chapters re-emerge to engage in conflict. Personal growth and forms of heroism are central themes of the story. Encouraged by the book's critical and financial success, the publisher requested a sequel. Characters[edit] Plot[edit] Concept and creation[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hobbit

The Hobbit (film series) The Hobbit is a film series consisting of three epic fantasy adventure films directed by Peter Jackson. They are based on the 1937 novel The Hobbit by J. R. R Tolkien. Portions of the trilogy are also adapted from the appendices to The Return of the King. The films are subtitled An Unexpected Journey (2012), The Desolation of Smaug (2013), and There and Back Again (2014).

Lewis Carroll Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (/ˈtʃɑrlz ˈlʌtwɪdʒ ˈdɒdsən/;[1] [2] 27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by his pen name, Lewis Carroll (/ˈkærəl/), was an English writer, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon and photographer. His most famous writings are Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, its sequel Through the Looking-Glass, which includes the poem Jabberwocky, and the poem The Hunting of the Snark, all examples of the genre of literary nonsense. He is noted for his facility at word play, logic, and fantasy. There are societies in many parts of the world (including the United Kingdom, Japan, the United States, and New Zealand[3]) dedicated to the enjoyment and promotion of his works and the investigation of his life. Antecedents[edit] Dodgson was born in the little parsonage of Daresbury in Cheshire near the towns of Warrington and Runcorn,[8] the eldest boy but already the third child of the four-and-a-half-year-old marriage.

J. R. R. Tolkien John Ronald Reuel Tolkien, CBE (/ˈtɒlkiːn/ TOL-keen;[a] 3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English writer, poet, philologist, and university professor, best known as the author of the classic high fantasy works The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion. He served as the Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon and Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford, from 1925 to 1945 and Merton Professor of English Language and Literature and Fellow of Merton College, Oxford from 1945 to 1959.[1] He was at one time a close friend of C. S. Cyberspace (role-playing game) Cyberspace is a cyberpunk role-playing game published by Iron Crown Enterprises and using a somewhat modified version of their Spacemaster ruleset. The primary setting of Cyberspace is the urban sprawl around San Francisco in the year 2090. The game was out of print and unavailable for a number of years around the turn of the millennium, but is now available, with all of its supplements, from the publisher's homepage in a PDF format. Character classes for Cyberspace include: Jockey, a jack-of-all-tradesKiller, a combat specialistNet Junkie, a computer hackerSleaze, a specialist in social skillsTech Rat, technical wizard

High fantasy Genre overview[edit] High fantasy is defined as fantasy fiction set in an alternative, entirely fictional ("secondary") world, rather than the real, or "primary" world. The secondary world is usually internally consistent, but its rules differ in some way(s) from those of the primary world. By contrast, low fantasy is characterized by being set in the primary, or "real" world, or a rational and familiar fictional world, with the inclusion of magical elements.[1][2][3][4] Nikki Gamble distinguishes three subtypes of high fantasy:[3] The Silmarillion The Silmarillion /sɪlməˈrɪlɨən/ is a collection of J. R. R. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland Background[edit] Page from the original manuscript copy of Alice's Adventures Under Ground, 1864 Alice was published in 1865, three years after the Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson and the Reverend Robinson Duckworth rowed in a boat, on 4 July 1862[4] (this popular date of the "golden afternoon"[5] might be a confusion or even another Alice-tale, for that particular day was cool, cloudy and rainy[6]), up the Isis with the three young daughters of Henry Liddell (the Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University and Dean of Christ Church): Lorina Charlotte Liddell (aged 13, born 1849) ("Prima" in the book's prefatory verse); Alice Pleasance Liddell (aged 10, born 1852) ("Secunda" in the prefatory verse); Edith Mary Liddell (aged 8, born 1853) ("Tertia" in the prefatory verse).[7] The journey began at Folly Bridge near Oxford and ended five miles away in the village of Godstow.

The End of Eternity Origins[edit] The novel reflects the state of scientific knowledge of its time, some of which has been superseded. For instance, the power source for the time travellers is referred to as "Nova Sol", a link to the far future being used to tap the energy of the exploding Sun. It is now known that the Sun is too small to explode. The original End of Eternity appeared in 1986 in a collection called The Alternate Asimovs. Shadow World Shadow World is a high-fantasy campaign setting situated on the fictional planet of Kulthea. Originally produced for the Rolemaster role-playing game system, the game setting is owned by Iron Crown Enterprises (often referred to as I.C.E.). It is currently maintained by the primary author of the setting, Terry K. Amthor of Eidolon Studio (who also holds the trademark for Shadow World, and copyrights for non-gaming fiction related to the world). Themes[edit]

Fantasy Fairy tales and legends, such as Dobrynya Nikitich's rescue of Zabava Putyatichna from the dragon Gorynych, have been an important source for fantasy. In popular culture, the fantasy genre is predominantly of the medievalist form. In its broadest sense, however, fantasy comprises works by many writers, artists, filmmakers, and musicians, from ancient myths and legends to many recent works embraced by a wide audience today. Fantasy is studied in a number of disciplines (English, cultural studies, comparative literature, history, medieval studies). Work in this area ranges widely, from the structuralist theory of Tzvetan Todorov, which emphasizes the fantastic as a liminal space, to work on the connections (political, historical, literary) between medievalism and popular culture.[1] Traits of fantasy[edit]

The Hobbit The Hobbit is a novel by J.R.R. Tolkien, set in Middle-earth. The book was first published on September 21, 1937 and is set in the years 2941 to 2942 of the Third Age before the events of The Lord of the Rings.[1] The Book J.R.R. Through the Looking-Glass Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There (1871) is a novel by Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson), the sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865). The themes and settings of Through the Looking-Glass make it a kind of mirror image of Wonderland: the first book begins outdoors, in the warm month of May (4 May),[a] uses frequent changes in size as a plot device, and draws on the imagery of playing cards; the second opens indoors on a snowy, wintry night exactly six months later, on 4 November (the day before Guy Fawkes Night),[b] uses frequent changes in time and spatial directions as a plot device, and draws on the imagery of chess. In it, there are many mirror themes, including opposites, time running backwards, and so on. Plot summary[edit] Alice entering the Looking Glass. Illustration by Sir John Tenniel

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